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The Bachelor of Arts in Geography

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See "Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree" in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. Please request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Requirements: 48 units

See General Education Requirements in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Requirements and course offerings.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See "Diversity Requirement" in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education Requirements.

U.S. History, Constitution, and American Ideals: 6 units

See "U.S. History, Constitution, and American Ideals" under "Bachelor's Degree Requirements". This requirement is normally fulfilled by completing HIST 130 and POLS 155 or approved equivalents. Courses used to satisfy this requirement do not apply to General Education.

Literacy Requirement:

See Math and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog. Writing proficiency in the major is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of a course in your major which has been designated as the Writing Proficiency (WP) course for the semester in which you take the course. Students who earn below a C- are required to repeat the course and earn a C- or higher to receive WP credit. See the Class Schedule for the designated WP courses for each semester. You must pass ENGL 130 (or its equivalent) with a C- or higher before you may register for a WP course.

Course Requirements for the Major: 45 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree. Additional required courses, depending upon the selected option or advising pattern, are outlined following the major core program requirements.

Major Core Program: 24 units

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: High school biology, chemistry, or physics is recommended.
This course is a survey of the basic processes that determine flows of energy through the atmosphere and examines the subsequent interactions among water, landforms, soil, and vegetation that create and modify the surface of the earth. Students develop a recognition of landscape patterns, as well as an understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological principles and functions that create those patterns, in order to understand the natural environment in which we live and the role of humans affecting that environment. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (003857)
Survey of human populations and activities, with an emphasis upon how social, economic, political, and religious institutions influence interrelationships with the physical environment. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003859)
Introduction to essential geographic problem solving techniques which include: data collection, analysis, and presentation of spatial information. Techniques include map measurement and interpretation, aerial photo analysis, field observations with GPS, introductory geographic information systems, computer cartography, summary of numerical data, elementary probability, distributions, and introduction to statistical inference. This is an inductory tools course for students majoring in geography, the natural and earth sciences, and in such applied fields as planning and recreation. Several software analysis packages are introduced. 3 hours lecture. (015867)
Analysis of various field techniques and tools employed by geographers, and supervised application of field techniques in geography. Written and oral presentation of Field Survey. 6 hours activity. (003939)
Prerequisite: ENGL 130 (or its equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
The course introduces students to topics and analyses in the geographical tradition; examines and evaluates library, public and Internet resource materials pertinent to geographical research; and prepares students for independent geographical scholarly research. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (020989)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Geography in the news. Analysis of current world conflicts and problem areas, with an emphasis upon examination of social, economic, political, and environmental realities. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003872)
Geographic analysis of humanity's interaction with the environment. Examines natural and human systems, resources, population, energy, and pollution. Develops an appreciation of the beauty, balance, and complexity of natural systems and human success in attaining harmony with them. Enhances awareness and perception of each individual's role in and with the environment. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (003873)

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: GEOG 219 or equivalent.
Introduction to the compilation, design, and production of thematic maps. Emphasis is on maps as communication devices. 3 hours lecture. (003880)
Prerequisites: GEOG 219 or MATH 105 or equivalent.
Introduction to quantitative analysis of spatial data using single and two sample inference, analysis of variance, correlation, multiple regression, analysis of co-variance, experimental design, repeated measures, nonparametric procedures, categorical data analysis, clustering/classification, and principal components analysis. Examples are drawn from geographical themes in economics, demography, politics, planning, natural and earth sciences. Statistical packages are introduced. 3 hours lecture. (003881)
Prerequisites: GEOG 219 or equivalent.
This course provides an introduction to topics in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course will combine a conceptual discussion of topics with practical exercises using microcomputer software. Both the theory and practice of GIS analysis will be presented. 3 hours lecture. (003883)

Note: Techniques courses completed for the Geography Core cannot be double counted toward the techniques courses taken in the geography advising options.

Major Option Course Requirements: 21 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required dependent upon the option chosen. Students must select one of the following options for completion of the major course requirements.

The Option in Human Geography and Planning: 21 units

3 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A systematic survey of human economic activities. Analysis of resource exploitation and use, including agriculture, extractive activities, industry, commerce, and service functions. Recommended for business and liberal arts majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003871)
Study of the theory and practice of planning. Analysis of planning processes, elements of the comprehensive plan, zoning, environmental impact of development, regional policies, and growth. Includes investigation of a practical planning problem. 3 hours lecture. (003884)
Analysis of the special character of North American landscapes. Examination of the historical evolution of contemporary landscapes through maps, reading, literature, field observations, and class discussion. Emphasis on comparison of regional patterns and the shaping of American landscapes by cultural and economic factors. 3 hours discussion. (003890)

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: GEOG 101 and GEOG 102 or equivalents.
An analysis of the complex interactions between humans, plants, and animals in the restoration process. Includes the use of maps and other graphic material as well as reading, lecture, and discussion. Emphasis on how human activities can affect the distribution and abundance of various plant and animal species in both negative and positive ways. Restoration work on the Butte Creek Ecological Reserves and other similar sites provide a focus for class projects and discussion. 3 hours lecture. (003930)
Examination of economic, social, demographic, and political bases for sustainable community and regional development and planning. Introduces the theory, evolution and practice of planning for sustainable communities and regions through examination of environmental, economic, and equity issues. 3 hours discussion. (003947)
Prerequisites: GEOG 304 or equivalent.
Analysis of local, regional, national, and international water resource projects, distributions, and characteristics. 3 hours seminar. (003948)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
This course is also offered as AMST 435 .
A regional and topical description of North America at selected time periods, including cultural groups, land tenure systems, settlement patterns, agriculture, exploration and mapping, resource use, urbanization, population and migrations, and present-day results. 3 hours discussion. (000412)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
This seminar is required of students minoring in Environmental Studies and is to be taken as the culminating course in the minor. The course integrates the cross-disciplinary elements of the minor, emphasizing the interplay among the scientific, social, legal, historical, and humanistic elements of the study of the environment. 3 hours seminar. (009080)

1-2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A regional study of our nation in terms of the physical earth and its human use. The course includes emphasis on issues and problems related to resources, environmental concerns, and settlement patterns. Cultural and regional differences in human-environmental relationships are compared and contrasted. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (003902)
This course is also offered as LAST 354 .
An interdisciplinary approach to the study of social institutions and culture in terms of family, neighborhood, community, region, and nation, with specific emphasis on Mexico. This course is designed to be a component of the Upper-Division Theme on Mexico and Central America. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003903)
This course is also offered as LAST 355 .
Study of the physical environment, human settlement, development, and modern problems of the nations of Central America and the Caribbean. This course is designed to be a component of the Upper-Division Theme on Mexico and Central America. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003905)
A survey of the physical and cultural environments of South America. Emphasis will be given to the interrelationships between the people and the land, the cultural similarities and differences of Spanish and Portuguese South America, and the resulting contemporary environment. 3 hours discussion. (003907)

0-3 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: GEOG 219 or equivalent.
Introduction to the compilation, design, and production of thematic maps. Emphasis is on maps as communication devices. 3 hours lecture. (003880)
Prerequisites: GEOG 219 or MATH 105 or equivalent.
Introduction to quantitative analysis of spatial data using single and two sample inference, analysis of variance, correlation, multiple regression, analysis of co-variance, experimental design, repeated measures, nonparametric procedures, categorical data analysis, clustering/classification, and principal components analysis. Examples are drawn from geographical themes in economics, demography, politics, planning, natural and earth sciences. Statistical packages are introduced. 3 hours lecture. (003881)
Analysis of various field techniques and tools employed by geographers, and supervised application of field techniques in geography. Written and oral presentation of Field Survey. 6 hours activity. (003939)
Prerequisites: GEOG 219.
An introduction to the theory, techniques, data acquisition, processing, and presentation of imagery acquired through aerial photographic and satellite means of remote sensing. Application of basic skills of aerial photographic interpretation and satellite digital image processing and analysis to physical and cultural geographic phenomena. 3 hours lecture. (003941)
Prerequisites: GEOG 219 or equivalent.
This course provides an introduction to topics in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course will combine a conceptual discussion of topics with practical exercises using microcomputer software. Both the theory and practice of GIS analysis will be presented. 3 hours lecture. (003883)
Prerequisites: GEOG 101 or GEOS 102 or equivalents, or faculty permission.
Systematic analysis of the origin and development of landforms. Emphasis is on the study of geomorphic processes using maps, air photos, and field data. 3 hours discussion. (003926)
Prerequisites: GEOG 101 or GEOS 120 or equivalent.
Systematic analysis of the processes and controls of the earth's climatic systems. Use of climatic classification systems; examination of climatic regions, microclimatology, and climatic applications. 3 hours lecture. (003928)
Prerequisites: GEOG 313.
Cartographic data entry, manipulation, and analysis in a computer mapping environment. Emphasis is on geographic information processing. 3 hours lecture. (003932)
Prerequisites: GEOG 315 and GEOG 319.
This course examines technical issues and emerging developments in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Topics include design considerations, data structures, algorithms, and problems. Both raster and vector GIS systems will be examined. Demonstration projects will require both cartographic and tabular output. 3 hours discussion. (003942)
Prerequisites: GEOG 320 or equivalent.
Study of the legal antecedents to California environmental impact legislation; analysis of environmental review procedures, environmental research, preparation and evaluation of EIRs, and conditional negative declarations. 3 hours discussion. (003949)
Prerequisites: GEOG 219, GEOG 320, or equivalent.
Relationship of physical, biotic, cultural, and aesthetic factors to land planning. Techniques of solving site problems dealing with topography, grading, slope stability, seismicity, hydrology, vegetation, wildlife, soils, micro-climate energy use, view-shed, and functional design. Land development projects are analyzed, and plans for new development projects are prepared. 3 hours discussion. (003950)
Prerequisites: GEOG 219, GEOG 320. Recommended: GEOG 101, GEOS 130, or NSCI 101.
This course introduces the theory and application of environmental and conservation planning. It critically examines the activities of environmental planning and the analytical approaches that can be used to direct resources toward conservation that yields the greatest return on biodiversity protection and ecosystem services sustainability. Students gain knowledge of the theories, techniques through practical experiences in planning activities, and institutional legalities of environmental and conservation planning. Using sustainability as a framework, this course presents the underlying concepts of sustainable land-use planning to best manage for abiotic and biotic resources. Focus is on the regional, local, and landscape scales. 3 hours lecture. (020744)
Prerequisites: BIOL 152, BIOL 334, or GEOG 101. Recommended: GEOG 219, GEOG 315.
This course examines biogeographic theory and practice as key for developing and evaluating strategies to prevent species extinction in the face of habitat loss, climate change, biotic homogneization, and invasive species, while assessing the effectiveness of existing and proposed protected area networks. The course focuses primarily on gaining an understanding of ecological interactions, evolution, extinction, and earth system science as processes, with an emphasis on quantitative and geographic methods used to determine the distribution and diversity of plant and animal populations. Focuse is also on understanding the fundamental issues in conservation biogeography including biodiversity, ecosystem function, sustainability, humans as part of ecosystems, invasive and endangered species, and reserve design to improve the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (003929)
Prerequisites: At least one of the following: AGRI 331, BIOL 414, BIOL 450, GEOG 343, GEOG 405, GEOG 444, GEOG 450, PSSC 330, PSSC 334, PSSC 433, PSSC 438, or faculty permission.
Pyrogeography is a comprehensive study of the physical and cultural parameters of fire. Topics covered include the spacial and temporal relationships of fire as an integral landscape process with an emphasis on the maintenance of North American ecosystems; the interpretation of the cultural uses of fire by indigenous communities as well as the historic and contemporary implications of fire management and policies; and the ecological implications of fire on biotic and abiotic systems. 3 hours discussion. (020415)

Note: A course from outside the department may be selected with advisor approval.

Option in Physical and Environmental Geography: 21 units

3 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: GEOG 101 or GEOS 102 or equivalents, or faculty permission.
Systematic analysis of the origin and development of landforms. Emphasis is on the study of geomorphic processes using maps, air photos, and field data. 3 hours discussion. (003926)
Prerequisites: GEOG 101 or GEOS 120 or equivalent.
Systematic analysis of the processes and controls of the earth's climatic systems. Use of climatic classification systems; examination of climatic regions, microclimatology, and climatic applications. 3 hours lecture. (003928)
Prerequisites: GEOG 342, GEOG 343; GEOG 444 or GEOG 445.
This course brings together the fields of climatology, biogeography, and geomorphology to study earth systems science as an integrative discipline of spatially dependent earth processes with implications for human systems. Major mechanisms and processes which produce climate change are covered with an examination of the impacts of past climate change on human societies. Observations and modeling of selected earth system components at various spatial scales of analysis facilitate an understanding of spatial modeling from simple to complex systems. 3 hours lecture. (015873)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: BIOL 152, BIOL 334, or GEOG 101. Recommended: GEOG 219, GEOG 315.
This course examines biogeographic theory and practice as key for developing and evaluating strategies to prevent species extinction in the face of habitat loss, climate change, biotic homogneization, and invasive species, while assessing the effectiveness of existing and proposed protected area networks. The course focuses primarily on gaining an understanding of ecological interactions, evolution, extinction, and earth system science as processes, with an emphasis on quantitative and geographic methods used to determine the distribution and diversity of plant and animal populations. Focuse is also on understanding the fundamental issues in conservation biogeography including biodiversity, ecosystem function, sustainability, humans as part of ecosystems, invasive and endangered species, and reserve design to improve the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (003929)
Prerequisites: At least one of the following: AGRI 331, BIOL 414, BIOL 450, GEOG 343, GEOG 405, GEOG 444, GEOG 450, PSSC 330, PSSC 334, PSSC 433, PSSC 438, or faculty permission.
Pyrogeography is a comprehensive study of the physical and cultural parameters of fire. Topics covered include the spacial and temporal relationships of fire as an integral landscape process with an emphasis on the maintenance of North American ecosystems; the interpretation of the cultural uses of fire by indigenous communities as well as the historic and contemporary implications of fire management and policies; and the ecological implications of fire on biotic and abiotic systems. 3 hours discussion. (020415)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: GEOG 101 and GEOG 102 or equivalents.
An analysis of the complex interactions between humans, plants, and animals in the restoration process. Includes the use of maps and other graphic material as well as reading, lecture, and discussion. Emphasis on how human activities can affect the distribution and abundance of various plant and animal species in both negative and positive ways. Restoration work on the Butte Creek Ecological Reserves and other similar sites provide a focus for class projects and discussion. 3 hours lecture. (003930)
Prerequisites: GEOG 304 or equivalent.
Analysis of local, regional, national, and international water resource projects, distributions, and characteristics. 3 hours seminar. (003948)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: GEOG 219 or equivalent.
Introduction to the compilation, design, and production of thematic maps. Emphasis is on maps as communication devices. 3 hours lecture. (003880)
Prerequisites: GEOG 219 or MATH 105 or equivalent.
Introduction to quantitative analysis of spatial data using single and two sample inference, analysis of variance, correlation, multiple regression, analysis of co-variance, experimental design, repeated measures, nonparametric procedures, categorical data analysis, clustering/classification, and principal components analysis. Examples are drawn from geographical themes in economics, demography, politics, planning, natural and earth sciences. Statistical packages are introduced. 3 hours lecture. (003881)
Analysis of various field techniques and tools employed by geographers, and supervised application of field techniques in geography. Written and oral presentation of Field Survey. 6 hours activity. (003939)
Prerequisites: GEOG 219.
An introduction to the theory, techniques, data acquisition, processing, and presentation of imagery acquired through aerial photographic and satellite means of remote sensing. Application of basic skills of aerial photographic interpretation and satellite digital image processing and analysis to physical and cultural geographic phenomena. 3 hours lecture. (003941)
Prerequisites: GEOG 219 or equivalent.
This course provides an introduction to topics in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course will combine a conceptual discussion of topics with practical exercises using microcomputer software. Both the theory and practice of GIS analysis will be presented. 3 hours lecture. (003883)
Prerequisites: GEOG 313.
Cartographic data entry, manipulation, and analysis in a computer mapping environment. Emphasis is on geographic information processing. 3 hours lecture. (003932)
Prerequisites: GEOG 315 and GEOG 319.
This course examines technical issues and emerging developments in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Topics include design considerations, data structures, algorithms, and problems. Both raster and vector GIS systems will be examined. Demonstration projects will require both cartographic and tabular output. 3 hours discussion. (003942)
Prerequisites: GEOG 320 or equivalent.
Study of the legal antecedents to California environmental impact legislation; analysis of environmental review procedures, environmental research, preparation and evaluation of EIRs, and conditional negative declarations. 3 hours discussion. (003949)
Prerequisites: GEOG 219, GEOG 320, or equivalent.
Relationship of physical, biotic, cultural, and aesthetic factors to land planning. Techniques of solving site problems dealing with topography, grading, slope stability, seismicity, hydrology, vegetation, wildlife, soils, micro-climate energy use, view-shed, and functional design. Land development projects are analyzed, and plans for new development projects are prepared. 3 hours discussion. (003950)
Prerequisites: GEOG 219, GEOG 320. Recommended: GEOG 101, GEOS 130, or NSCI 101.
This course introduces the theory and application of environmental and conservation planning. It critically examines the activities of environmental planning and the analytical approaches that can be used to direct resources toward conservation that yields the greatest return on biodiversity protection and ecosystem services sustainability. Students gain knowledge of the theories, techniques through practical experiences in planning activities, and institutional legalities of environmental and conservation planning. Using sustainability as a framework, this course presents the underlying concepts of sustainable land-use planning to best manage for abiotic and biotic resources. Focus is on the regional, local, and landscape scales. 3 hours lecture. (020744)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A systematic survey of human economic activities. Analysis of resource exploitation and use, including agriculture, extractive activities, industry, commerce, and service functions. Recommended for business and liberal arts majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003871)
Study of the theory and practice of planning. Analysis of planning processes, elements of the comprehensive plan, zoning, environmental impact of development, regional policies, and growth. Includes investigation of a practical planning problem. 3 hours lecture. (003884)
Analysis of the special character of North American landscapes. Examination of the historical evolution of contemporary landscapes through maps, reading, literature, field observations, and class discussion. Emphasis on comparison of regional patterns and the shaping of American landscapes by cultural and economic factors. 3 hours discussion. (003890)

Note: Any 3-unit upper-division course from outside the department may be selected with advisor approval.

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  1. You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  2. You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  3. Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  4. Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  5. Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  6. Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

Geography and Economics Double Major

Students may take two geography and two economics courses from the following list. All 12 units will count toward both majors (geography courses will count toward 100-level electives in the economics major).

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ECON 103.
An application of principles of economics to problems occurring in urban areas. Topics may include pollution, land use policy, education, poverty, transportation/congestion, location theory, migration, and the structure of local government. Emphasis will be on the usefulness of economics for understanding urban problems and for creating policy to deal with these contemporary issues. 3 hours lecture. (002669)
An analysis of the costs and benefits of environmental preservation. Systems for creating economic incentives for pollution abatement. Criteria for establishing optimum pollution abatement, including efficiency, safety, and sustainability standards. Impacts of population growth on global environmental problems. Alternative energy use patterns and their impact on energy markets and global environmental health. 3 hours lecture. (002671)
Prerequisites: ECON 103.
This course surveys theoretical approaches and policy options to the problems of development and underdevelopment in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Agricultural transformations, industrial development, balance of payments problems, the role of foreign aid, direct foreign investment, the economic role of international institutions such as the World Bank, and other related topics are included in this course. 3 hours lecture. (002673)
Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 102 or faculty permission.
A survey and analysis of economic development in the Pacific Rim and its linkages with politics, history, society, and foreign policy. Topics covered include trade, tariffs, subsidies, balance of payments, savings, investment, government deficits, environment, agricultural economics, and economic growth. 3 hours discussion. (002674)
Prerequisites: ECON 301.
Theory of location of economic activities. Land use. Systems of cities and regions. Regional structure and growth. Spatial aspects of urban areas and urban problems. 3 hours seminar. (002694)
Prerequisites: ECON 301.
An analysis of petroleum markets and the likely trend in prices. Alternatives to petroleum and increasing dependence on OPEC, including conservation technologies, efficiency improvements in conventional energy production, and the potential for expanded use of renewable energy resources. Public utility deregulation and the impact on the efficient use of energy. 3 hours seminar. (002695)
A systematic survey of human economic activities. Analysis of resource exploitation and use, including agriculture, extractive activities, industry, commerce, and service functions. Recommended for business and liberal arts majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003871)
Geographic analysis of humanity's interaction with the environment. Examines natural and human systems, resources, population, energy, and pollution. Develops an appreciation of the beauty, balance, and complexity of natural systems and human success in attaining harmony with them. Enhances awareness and perception of each individual's role in and with the environment. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (003873)
Study of the theory and practice of planning. Analysis of planning processes, elements of the comprehensive plan, zoning, environmental impact of development, regional policies, and growth. Includes investigation of a practical planning problem. 3 hours lecture. (003884)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of GEOG 315 or equivalent.
Examination of retail, service, and industrial location decision processes. Use of geographic information systems, quantitative methods, and field techniques to analyze and optimize business locations. 3 hours lecture. (003938)
Examination of economic, social, demographic, and political bases for sustainable community and regional development and planning. Introduces the theory, evolution and practice of planning for sustainable communities and regions through examination of environmental, economic, and equity issues. 3 hours discussion. (003947)

Geography and History Double Major

Students may elect a geography and history double major. Up to 6 units of appropriate upper-division history courses (HIST) may be applied to the geography major. Prior approval by a department advisor and the chair is required.

Catalog Cycle:11