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The Minor in Classical Civilization

Course Requirements for the Minor: 21-23 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required of all candidates for this minor.

Core: 3 units

1 course required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Origins and development of ancient Greece and Rome; politics, society, religion and mythology, archaeology, art and architecture, literature and philosophy of the Graeco-Roman world. (Core course for Classical Civilization Minor.) 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (004497)

Language: 0-8 units

If less than 8 units are taken or credit by prior experience is awarded, take additional units in Interdisciplinary Studies below to meet a minimum of 21 units for the minor.

0-8 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Introduction to the ancient Greek language and culture. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of reading, pronunciation, and composition in ancient Greek. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (020745)
Continuation of GREK 101. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of reading, pronunciation, and composition of ancient Greek. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (020746)
Introduction to the Latin language and culture. Emphasis on the fundamental skills of reading, pronunciation and composition of Latin. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (005390)
Continuation of LATN 101. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of reading, pronunciation, and composition in Latin. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (020732)

Interdisciplinary Studies: 9-15 units

3-5 courses selected from:

Choose 1 course from at least 3 different disciplines.

Art

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
In-depth study of the art and architecture of the Greek world during the Bronze Age, Aegean, Geometric, Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods. An emphasis will be placed upon understanding the development of the Greek artistic concepts, such as idealism and realism, within their cultural and political context. 3 hours lecture. (000858)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
In-depth study of the art and architecture of the Roman world covering the Etruscan, Republican, Early and Late Imperial periods. An emphasis will be placed upon understanding the Roman character of Roman art and architecture, as well as domestic life through the arts as found at Pompeii, Herculaneus, etc. 3 hours lecture. (000860)

English

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An introduction to the literature of ancient Greece and Rome. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (003411)

History

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Origins, development, decline, and transitions in Bronze Age, Dark Age, and Archaic Age Greek civilization. Emphasis on the politics, social conditions, religion, philosophy, and culture of Archaic Greece and the early Persian Wars period (ca. 499-479 B.C.). 3 hours seminar. (004582)
Development, decline, and transitions associated with the evolution of the Classical period of ancient Greek civilization during the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. Primary emphasis on the politics, social conditions, religion, philosophy, and culture of the "Golden Age" of the fifth century B.C. 3 hours seminar. (004583)
Examination of the Greek world and the Persian Empire at the time of the rise of Macedon as a significant power under Philip II (r.359-336 B.C.E.) and during the life of Alexander the Great (r.336-323 B.C.E.). 3 hours seminar. (004584)
Political, social, and cultural history of the Eastern Mediterranean world and the Middle East from the death of Alexander the Great through the Roman conquest of Ptolemaic Egypt, i.e., Hellenistic civilization (323 to 30 B.C.E.). 3 hours seminar. (015754)
Political, social, and cultural history of Rome from its origins (within the world of pre-Roman Italy) down to Rome's emergence as the dominant power of the Mediterranean world. Emphasis is on the development of the Roman Republic's government, the nature of Roman imperialism, and social and cultural changes of the Second Century B.C.E. Time from of the courses is ca. 800-146 B.C.E. 3 hours seminar. (015803)
Political, social, and cultural history of Rome and the Roman Empire from the crises of the Later Roman Republic down to the emergence of the Augustan Principate and the rule of the Caesars. Emphasis is on the conflicts that culminated in the collapse of the Roman Republic, the restoration of order under Augustus, and the cultural achievements of the Age of Cicero and the Augustan Golden Age. Time frame for the course is 146 B.C.E. to 14 C.E. 3 hours seminar. (004586)
Political, social, and cultural history of the Roman Empire of the Caesars from the Julio-Claudian emperors (14-68 C.E.) to the end of the Severan Dynasty (435 C E.). Emphasis on the Julio-Claudian period, the achievements of Pax Romana, and the cultural transitions into Late Antiquity that emerged in the Second Century C.E. 3 hours seminar. (004587)
Examination of the Byzantine or East Roman Empire (630-1453) with emphasis on the sixth through ninth centuries and the Byzantine influence on Western Europe, Slavic Eastern Europe, and the Middle East. 3 hours seminar. (004591)

Philosophy

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Western philosophical thought from the pre-Socratics through Stoicism, including movements and figures such as Pythagoreanism, Plato, Aristotle, and Epicureanism. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007181)

Religious Studies

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An introduction to Greek mythology and its ancient Near Eastern parallels. The course focuses on the analysis of ancient Greek art and literature (including epic, hymns, lyric poetry, tragedy, and historiography). Topics explored include dying and rising gods, athletics and warfare, hospitality and gift exchange, initiation rituals and the afterlife, and the sex and gender roles of men and women. In addition, students consider Roman, Jewish, and Christian approaches to Greek myth and explore the impact of myth on modern art and film. 3 hours discussion. (008135)
This course covers the books of the Christian New Testament in the context of ancient Judaism and the world of the ancient Mediterranean. Who wrote the gospels and the epistles? Is there anti-Jewish prejudice in the New Testament? This class explores how Jesus was depicted, inquires whether the new Testament promotes or opposes Gnosticism, explains why the Christian apocrypha are not accepted as scripture, and also considers the relationship between the early Christian movement and ancient Greek mystery religions, the Dead Sea Scroll sect, Hellenistic Judaism, and/or Enoch traditions. 3 hours seminar. (008141)

Ancient Cultures of Asia, Africa, and the Americas: 3 units

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Students examine the early civilizations of the Levant with foundations in the Early Bronze Age. The class focuses on Middle and Late Bronze Age period Canaan, the development of villages, towns, and societies during the periods of Canaanite and early Hebrew settlement. The focus of the course is with the cultural, demographic, political, and economic emergence of the nation of Israel with comparisons in the Old Testament and extra-biblical accounts of the period. Tools used in the examination include interpretation of evidence from archaeological excavations, historical materials, biblical and other textual sources, and area studies. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (020211)
An examination of the data and major theories concerning the rise of civilizations, using as case studies early Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Mexico, and Peru. The significance of food production, ecology, writing, and the centralized state in the evolution of complex societies. 3 hours lecture. (000561)
A comparative study of the prehistoric cultural traditions of the Mesoamerican and Andean regions. The Aztec, Inca, Maya, and their predecessors viewed as case studies in cultural evolution in the New World. 3 hours lecture. (000568)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
A survey of ancient Mexican art and culture of formative, classic, conquest, including the Olmec, Teotihuacan, Zapotec, Mxtec, Classic Gulf Coast, Toltec, and Aztec. Sites discussed include El Tajin, La Venta, Monte Alban, Milta, Tula, and Tenochtitlan 3 hours lecture. (000841)
An investigation of the art of the ancient Maya of Mexico and Central America prior to European contact, from the Preclassic to Postclassic periods. The relationship of art to religious beliefs and practices will be explored, as well as the development of local styles associated with royal courts. Sites discussed include Tikal, Palenque, Copan, Uxmal, and Chichen Itza 3 hours lecture. (020618)
An investigation of the art of Peru and adjacent regions prior to European contact. The relationship of art to religious beliefs and practices, political ideologies, and the significance of styles and technologies are examined. Cultures surveyed include Chavin, Paracas, Nasca, Moche, Tiwanaku, and Inka, as well as the Northern Andean civilizations such as San Agustin. 3 hours lecture. (020619)
Genesis and character of the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia (Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, Kassites, Assyrians, Chaldeans), Asia Minor (Hittites), Syro-Palestine (Ebla, Phoenicia, Israel), and Iran (Elamites, Medes, Persians). 3 hours seminar. (004585)
Problems associated with studying early Egyptian history; prehistory and the origins of Egyptian civilization; primary focus on Archaic and Old Kingdom Egypt, especially on the Age of the Pyramids. 3 hours lecture. (004654)
Political, social, religious, and cultural history of Egypt from the First Intermediate Period through the Late Period with principal emphasis on the Middle and New Kingdom Periods. The time frame of the course is ca. 2200 to 525 B.C.E. 3 hours lecture. (015847)
This course is also offered as MJIS 303 .
An introduction to the Hebrew Bible (also known as the Old Testament of Christianity and the Tanakh of Judaism) in English translation. Readings from the Pentateuch, the prophetic books, and the hagiographa. The course emphasizes the analysis of the biblical books in their ancient Near Eastern contexts, the documentary hypotheses, Israelite history and religion, the formation of the biblical canon, and early Jewish and Christian scriptural interpretation. 3 hours lecture. (005858)

For further information on the Minor in Classical Civilization, consult the coordinator for the minor.

Catalog Cycle:11