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The Bachelor of Arts in Humanities

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See "Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree" in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. Please request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Requirements: 48 units

See General Education Requirements in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Requirements and course offerings.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See "Diversity Requirement" in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education Requirements.

U.S. History, Constitution, and American Ideals: 6 units

See "U.S. History, Constitution, and American Ideals" under "Bachelor's Degree Requirements". This requirement is normally fulfilled by completing HIST 130 and POLS 155 or approved equivalents. Courses used to satisfy this requirement do not apply to General Education.

Literacy Requirement:

See Math and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog. Writing proficiency in the major is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of a course in your major which has been designated as the Writing Proficiency (WP) course for the semester in which you take the course. Students who earn below a C- are required to repeat the course and earn a C- or higher to receive WP credit. See the Class Schedule for the designated WP courses for each semester. You must pass ENGL 130 (or its equivalent) with a C- or higher before you may register for a WP course.

Course Requirements for the Major: 41 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree.

Some courses appear under more than one area heading, but each course may be used to fulfill requirements in only one area.

Major Core Program: 12 units

4 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An overview of the artistic and intellectual heritage of the cultures of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Israel, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Medieval Europe, and Islam from their origins to 1500 C.E. Comparative analysis of music, art, architecture, and primary texts (theatre, philosophy and religion, literature, history, and political science). 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (015843)
An overview of Western Culture from 1500 C.E. to the present, with selected reference to concurrent developments in India, China, Japan, Africa, and The Americas. Serves as a broad introduction to the major forms and types of artistic expression: sculpture, architecture, painting, philosophy, literature, drama, dance, film, and music, and includes comparative analysis of primary texts (theatre, philosophy and religion, literature, history, and political science). 3 hours lecture. (015845)
A comprehensive introduction to Eastern art, literature, and philosophy, as revealed in the civilizations of India, China, and Japan. The course examines the rise of civilization in India, China, and Japan with special focus on Confucius, Lao Tzu, and the Buddha, and follows the development of artistic and intellectual culture down to modern times. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (020684)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 (or its equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
A seminar devoted to interdisciplinary research in the humanities. Students will write and present a research project on an approved topic of their choice. Required for Humanities majors. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. (004824)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 (or its equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, faculty permission.
To provide an opportunity for students accepted for "Honors in the Major" to prepare and write an Honors research paper on a topic germane to those interests developed during the first three years of work in Humanities. Research and writing will be done under supervision of a faculty advisor and for a total of 6 units in two semesters. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. (004829)

HUMN 400 or HUMN 499H should be chosen in consultation with an advisor.

Language Requirement: 8 units

2 courses selected from the following:

Romance and Germanic Languages:

Courses must be selected from the third and fourth semester levels:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: FREN 102 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in FREN 101 and FREN 102. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (003795)
Prerequisites: FREN 201 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in FREN 101, FREN 102, and FREN 201. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (003794)
Prerequisites: GERM 102 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in GERM 101 and GERM 102. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (004204)
Prerequisites: GERM 201 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in GERM 101, GERM 102, and GERM 201. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (004203)
Prerequisites: ITAL 102 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in ITAL 101 and ITAL 102. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (005093)
Prerequisites: ITAL 201 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in ITAL 101, ITAL 102, and ITAL 201. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (005092)
Prerequisites: SPAN 102 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in SPAN 101 and SPAN 102. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (009121)
Prerequisites: SPAN 201 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in SPAN 101, SPAN 102, and SPAN 201. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (009120)

Classical, non-Romance, and non-Germanic Languages:

Courses may be selected from the first and second semester levels:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Introduction to Arabic language and culture. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Arabic. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (020747)
Prerequisites: ARAB 101A.
Continuation of ARAB 101A. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Arabic. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (020748)
Introduction to Chinese language and Culture. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading and writing Chinese. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (020752)
Prerequisites: CHNS 101A.
Continuation of CHNS 101A. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (020753)
Introduction to the ancient Greek language and culture. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of reading, pronunciation, and composition in ancient Greek. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (020745)
Continuation of GREK 101. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of reading, pronunciation, and composition of ancient Greek. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (020746)
Introduction to the Modern Hebrew language and culture. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Modern Hebrew. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (020724)
Continuation of HBRW 101A. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Modern Hebrew. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (020725)
Introduction to the Japanese language and culture. Emphasis on the development of fundamental skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing with clear understanding of basic sentence structures. Acquisition of Hiragana and Katakana characters (phonetic symbols). 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (005334)
Prerequisites: JAPN 101 or faculty permission.
Continuation of JAPN 101. Special attention to different verb forms and essential auxiliary expressions. Appropriate language use in a variety of social settings. Acquisition of 110 Kanji characters (ideographic symbols). 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (005335)
Introduction to the Latin language and culture. Emphasis on the fundamental skills of reading, pronunciation and composition of Latin. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (005390)
Continuation of LATN 101. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of reading, pronunciation, and composition in Latin. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (020732)
Introduction to Russian language and its associated cultures. Emphasis on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Russian. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. Formerly RUSS 101. (008916)
Prerequisites: RUSS 101A.
Continuation of RUSS 101A. Emphasis on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Russian. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. Formerly RUSS 102. (008920)

Interdisciplinary Studies: 21-22 units

Period/Area Focus Course: 3 units

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
The study of modern world literature written English. Works may vary from semester to semester and focus on one region or culture (such as India, Africa, or the Caribbean), or several regions or cultures. 3 hours seminar. (003577)
Development, decline, and transitions associated with the evolution of the Classical period of ancient Greek civilization during the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. Primary emphasis on the politics, social conditions, religion, philosophy, and culture of the "Golden Age" of the fifth century B.C. 3 hours seminar. (004583)
Political, social, and cultural history of the Roman Empire of the Caesars from the Julio-Claudian emperors (14-68 C.E.) to the end of the Severan Dynasty (435 C E.). Emphasis on the Julio-Claudian period, the achievements of Pax Romana, and the cultural transitions into Late Antiquity that emerged in the Second Century C.E. 3 hours seminar. (004587)
Consequences of the collapse of Carolingian rule, and the gradual shaping of a Christian Europe divided into autonomous regional political units. (Core course for Medieval Studies Minor.) 3 hours seminar. (004588)
New ideas about power and social structure in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Europe: Humanism, socio-political transformations, secular attitudes in art and society. 3 hours seminar. (004592)
The breakdown of religious consensus among Europeans; the people and directions of Reform; technology and the military revolution of the period; rulers, people, and the idea of revolution; the reconsolidating of a European elite. 3 hours seminar. (015755)
A survey of European history from the defeat of Napoleon to the outbreak of the First World War. The emphasis is on the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution, the growth of cities, the emergence of secular ideologies (liberalism, nationalism, and socialism), the reasons for European imperial expansion, the formation of a mass society, and the rise of the artistic and literary avant-garde. 3 hours seminar. (004601)
An examination of the history of European society, politics, and ideas in the twentieth century. The emphasis is on the causes and course of the First World War, the rise of communism in the Soviet Union and of fascism in Italy and Germany, the emergence of modern culture in the interwar period, the causes and course of the Second World War, and the reconstruction of postwar Europe. 3 hours seminar. (004602)

Courses By Discipline: 15-16 units

5 courses selected from:

Note: You must choose 1 course from 5 different disciplines of the 8 disciplines listed below.

Art

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
In-depth study of the art and architecture of the Greek world during the Bronze Age, Aegean, Geometric, Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods. An emphasis will be placed upon understanding the development of the Greek artistic concepts, such as idealism and realism, within their cultural and political context. 3 hours lecture. (000858)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
In-depth study of the art and architecture of the Roman world covering the Etruscan, Republican, Early and Late Imperial periods. An emphasis will be placed upon understanding the Roman character of Roman art and architecture, as well as domestic life through the arts as found at Pompeii, Herculaneus, etc. 3 hours lecture. (000860)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
In-depth study of the art and architecture of the Middle Ages, with an emphasis on the Romanesque and Gothic periods in France and England. The course will cover great cathedrals, such as Notre Dame of Paris, Chartres, Amiens, etc., and their sculpture and stained glass decorations. The course will also provide an understanding of the nature of style change and development from the Classical to the Medieval periods. 3 hours lecture. (000843)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
An investigation of form and content in Italian Renaissance and Mannerist painting, sculpture, and architecture between 1400 and 1500. The impact on art of Neoplatonic philosophy, Humanism, Franciscan Catholicism, political intrigues, and the growth of capitalism will be considered, as well as other aspects of the historical context of art. Botticelli, Donatello, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Titian are among the artists to be studied. 3 hours lecture. (000846)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
An investigation of form and content in European painting, printmaking, sculpture, architecture, and decorative arts during the second half of the nineteenth century. Attitudes toward observation versus invention, and originality versus eclecticism, common to Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, Symbolist, and Expressionist artists will be examined. Writings by philosophers, artists, and critics, such as Ruskin and Van Gogh, will be analyzed. Issues related to gender and to Non-Western peoples will be discussed, as well as the effect on art of the Industrial Revolution, wars, and progress in the fields of education and science. Some of the artists to be covered are Cassatt, Cezanne, Gaugin, Manet, Monet, Marisot, Modersohn-Becker, Seurat, and Munch. 3 hours lecture. (000776)
Prerequisites: ARTH 102 for Art majors.
An investigation of artists and issues that have occupied the global contemporary art world since 1980. 3 hours lecture. (000838)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
In-depth study of Chinese and Japanese visual arts (architecture, painting, sculpture, and other fine arts such as ceramics and woodblock prints) from the pre-historic to the nineteenth-century period. 3 hours lecture. (000844)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
A survey of ancient Mexican art and culture of formative, classic, conquest, including the Olmec, Teotihuacan, Zapotec, Mxtec, Classic Gulf Coast, Toltec, and Aztec. Sites discussed include El Tajin, La Venta, Monte Alban, Milta, Tula, and Tenochtitlan 3 hours lecture. (000841)
An investigation of the art of the ancient Maya of Mexico and Central America prior to European contact, from the Preclassic to Postclassic periods. The relationship of art to religious beliefs and practices will be explored, as well as the development of local styles associated with royal courts. Sites discussed include Tikal, Palenque, Copan, Uxmal, and Chichen Itza 3 hours lecture. (020618)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
This course is also offered as CHST 406.
A survey of Mexican art and culture from the Cortesian Conquest, the Colonial Period of monastery- and church-building, the Revolution of 1810, the Revolution of 1910, and the painters of the great revolutionary mural movement that followed, Rivera, Orozco, and Siqueriros, to contemporary artists who have tended toward international pluralism. Attention is given to the process of acculturation that produced the modern Mexican peoples, their national character, and their contemporary art. 3 hours lecture. (000842)
An investigation of the art of Peru and adjacent regions prior to European contact. The relationship of art to religious beliefs and practices, political ideologies, and the significance of styles and technologies are examined. Cultures surveyed include Chavin, Paracas, Nasca, Moche, Tiwanaku, and Inka, as well as the Northern Andean civilizations such as San Agustin. 3 hours lecture. (020619)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
Investigation of the traditional and contemporary arts and cultures of the Amerindian and Eskimo of the continental United States, Canada, and Alaska. Six major culture areas will be examined: the Arctic, Pacific Northwest, California, the Southwest, and Eastern Woodlands, and the florescent cultures of the Plains and Intermontane. Such problems as a definition of Indian Art, transoceanic contact, acculturation, and the moral and ethical questions posed by Indian Rights will be considered. 3 hours lecture. (000852)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
An investigation of the arts and cultures of the African continent, with major emphasis upon the Negroid peoples south of the Sahara, the medieval kingdoms of the Sudan and the rain forest cultures and great civilizations of Ife, Benin, and the Congo, the sculpture, painting, body art, architecture, music, dance, belief systems, aural tradition of folklore, and reciprocal influences with other continents will be considered. 3 hours lecture. (000853)
The development of photography from roots in classical and medieval discoveries to the present, its role in historical documentation, its reciprocal influence upon the arts, its contribution to science, and its importance as an extension of human vision. Non-silver processes and fusion of photography with computer and other media will be examined. Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, Alfred Stieglitz, and Edward Weston are among the photographers to be considered. 3 hours lecture. (000773)

English

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as AFAM 251.
Introduction to African American literature, using a range of materials from past and present that may include slave and neo-slave narratives, oratory and sermons, poems, plays, and novels, songs and spirituals. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000135)
This course is also offered as AIST 252.
Study of the oral and written literature of the American Indian and of related historical and critical materials. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000377)
This course is also offered as AAST 253.
An introduction to various traditions and issues of the Asian American experience in literature. The course explores both early and contemporary novels, poems, and plays by writers of different genders, ethnicities, and cultures. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000002)
Survey of Chicano/Latino literature and of related historical and critical materials. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (003417)
A survey of British literature from Beowulf to mid-1700s. 3 hours lecture. (003472)
An intensive survey of major issues and themes in non-Western literature. Students examine the interconnections between works of Western cultures and works from the literatures of Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (003470)
An introduction to the literature of ancient Greece and Rome. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (003411)
Study of the literary types and qualities of the English Bible and their impact upon British and American literature and language. 3 hours seminar. (003471)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 (or its equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
Study of the Canterbury Tales and other works by the major poet of the English Middle Ages. The study of Middle English and of medieval society, its values and beliefs as mirrored in Chaucer's works. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. (003503)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 (or its equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
An introduction to Shakespeare's principal plays, his art, his age, and his critics; designed especially for English majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. (003507)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 (or its equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
A study of Paradise Lost and other works of Milton in the context of the English Revolution. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. (003509)
Prerequisites: ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
Study of British art and culture as revealed in its literature, such as battle poems, morality plays, and Arthurian romances. 3 hours seminar. (003506)
Prerequisites: ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
A study of the literature and culture of seventeenth-century England, emphasizing the drama, poetry, and prose of such authors as Webster, Jonson, Herrick, Donne, Herbert, Taylor, Bunyan, and Milton. 3 hours lecture. (003513)
Study of twentieth-century British, American, Continental, and Latin American poetry. 3 hours seminar. (003543)
British, Continental, and American drama from Ibsen to the present. Topics vary from semester to semester. 3 hours seminar. (003549)
Comparative study of major genres, themes, and literary figures in literature. Topics vary from semester to semester. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (003552)
Prerequisites: ENGL 278, ENGL 340.
An in-depth study of major themes, authors, and works from the beginnings of American literature through Romanticism. Topics vary from semester to semester. 3 hours seminar. (003558)
Prerequisites: ENGL 279, ENGL 340.
An in-depth study of major themes, authors, and works from Realism through Modernism. Topics vary from semester to semester. 3 hours seminar. (003559)
British, American, Continental, and Latin American novels in the twentieth century. 3 hours seminar. (003562)
The study of modern world literature written English. Works may vary from semester to semester and focus on one region or culture (such as India, Africa, or the Caribbean), or several regions or cultures. 3 hours seminar. (003577)

Foreign Languages and Literatures

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: FREN 301, FREN 302, or FREN 303.
A survey of French literature with special emphasis on genres, literary techniques, and methods of analysis, early French literature to the French Revolution. 3 hours discussion. (003815)
Prerequisites: FREN 301, FREN 302, or FREN 303.
A survey of French literature with special emphasis on genres, literary techniques, and methods of analysis, Romantic to Contemporary Period. 3 hours discussion. (003816)
Prerequisites: FREN 301, FREN 302, or FREN 303.
This course involves study of literature and society in Francophone Africa from the Maghreb (Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria) through Senegal and West Africa to Madagascar and the Reunion Island, New France (Quebec), the French Caribbean, the South Pacific (Tahiti), and Southeast Asia (Vietnam, Cambodia). 3 hours seminar. (003828)
An introduction to French cinema as a narrative form, with emphasis on key films and directors from various periods of French film history. The class is taught in English. All films have English subtitles. 3 hours discussion. (003813)
Prerequisites: GERM 202 or equivalent.
Primary emphasis on the classical works of Schiller and Goethe, with attention given as well to Lessing and the Sturm und Drang movement as precursors of the period. 3 hours discussion. (004225)
Prerequisites: GERM 202 or equivalent.
Study of prose and lyric works of Novalis, Tieck, Arnim, Brentano, Hoffman, Eichendorff, and other figures of the Romantic Period. Analysis of literary and intellectual trends within the period. 3 hours discussion. (004226)
Prerequisites: GERM 202 or equivalent.
Readings in prose, drama, and lyric of the Expressionists, Rilke, Mann, Hesse, Kafka, Brecht, and others. 3 hours discussion. (004229)
Class taught in English. All films have English subtitles. Historical survey of film classics from the Expressionist cinema, the Weimar Republic, and the Third Reich, with an introduction to the main currents in film aesthetics and theory from Kracauer to contemporary feminist film theories. Readings of major authors on films, including Brecht, Eisner, and Kracauer. Screening of films by Murnau, Lang, and von Sternberg. 3 hours discussion. (004223)
Class taught in English. All films have English subtitles. Historical survey of representative films from the post-war era, the New German, and feminist cinema, including study of their cultural and social significance, with a component of significant film aesthetics and theories from Kluge to contemporary feminist film theories. 3 hours discussion. (004224)
Prerequisites: ITAL 202 or equivalent.
Study of the most important writers of Italian literature from Dante to modern times. Emphasis on genre, textual analysis, and interpretation. Readings, discussions, and reports. 3 hours discussion. (005104)
A study of the major events in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Italy and their influence upon other European countries. Taught in English. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (005108)
The Italian Cinema as a creative art form has had a profound and lasting impact on world cinematography. The course will include Italian film history and the study of major trends and techniques. The relationship of the cinema to socio-political, economic, and literary events in Italy and the world will be studied: Neorealism, The Felliniesque, Spaghetti Western, Commedia all'Italiana, and more recent trends. The class is taught in English and all films have English subtitles. 3 hours discussion. (005111)
An introduction to Japanese history and geography, as well as Japanese art forms, literature, philosophy, education, economy, customs, language, and politics. Course also includes a comparison of Japanese and American organizational theories. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (000993)
This course is taught in English. It examines a variety of Japanese films involving the following cultural themes: roles of men and women, society, history, politics, education, theater, sports, music, industry, comedy, etc. In the process, the students examine and analyze the myths and realities of Japanese people as portrayed in the films. Discussions are designed to increase students' awareness of intercultural communication, to foster their preparedness for functioning in the complex order of Japanese society. All films have English subtitles. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (020182)
Prerequisites: SPAN 301.
Introduces students to the study of Hispanic literature and culture, and develops their skills in language comprehension and analysis of prose, poetry, and drama. The works studied will be short stories, full-length plays, and Hispanic-American narrative and lyric poetry. SPAN 341 and SPAN 342 are required of all majors and count as electives for the minor. Either fulfills the prerequisite for all other upper-division literature courses. 3 hours discussion. (009140)
Prerequisites: SPAN 301.
Introduces students to the study of Hispanic literature and culture, and develops their skills in language comprehension and analysis of prose, poetry, and drama. Works studied will be the novel, one-act plays, and Peninsular Spanish narrative and lyric poetry. SPAN 342 is required of all majors and fulfills the prerequisite for all other upper-division literature courses. 3 hours discussion. (009141)
This course is also offered as CHST 354.
A study of the Chicano people as reflected in selected films and literature. Reading, discussions, and reports will be in English. This is a service course for non-majors and not elective for a BA degree or minor in Spanish. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (001977)
Prerequisites: SPAN 301; SPAN 341 or SPAN 342; or faculty permission.
Readings and reports on literature of Mexico from pre-Columbian to contemporary literature. 3 hours discussion. (009168)
Prerequisites: SPAN 301; SPAN 341 or SPAN 342; or faculty permission.
Cervantes' novel and his amiable madman in the larger context of literature and culture. Commentary on contemporary history, society, and politics. 3 hours discussion. (009165)

History

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An exploration of the main currents in European intellectual history from the French Revolution to the present, emphasizing the rise of modernism in art, literature, philosophy, and the social sciences in the twentieth century. The focus will be on the analysis of primary texts by Marx, Freud, Nietzche, and other writers and thinkers. 3 hours seminar. (004528)
This course is also offered as WMST 326.
This course explores major themes and developments in the social and cultural history of European women from the 1700s to the present, including changing gender roles, attitudes toward sexuality, reproduction, and the family. In particular, the course examines women's struggle to define themselves and their roles in society and their impact on the social identities of men. 3 hours lecture. (004531)
This course is also offered as MEST 362.
Introduction to some major aspects of society and culture in the Middle East, including the family, styles of living, roles of men and women, and Islamic religion. Examination of the nationalistic movements and politics in Turkey, Egypt, Iran, and Israel. Analyses of cultural and political issues, such as the Palestinian question, Arab-Israeli conflict, Islamic resurgence, and modernization. This course is designed to be a component of the Upper-Division Theme on Cross-Cultural Exploration. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004550)
Peoples, cultures, and economic systems of Africa before 1800, with emphasis on agricultural history, long-distance trade, state formation, and African religions. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004532)
Africa since 1800. Establishment and demise of European colonial regimes, African resistance to foreign domination, African political systems, dilemmas of socio-economic development, and gender differences in modern African life. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004533)
Cultural, economic, and political evolution of eastern Asia from antiquity to 1800. Emphasis on common traditional heritage of China and Japan. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004560)
Cultural, economic, and political evolution of eastern Asia from 1800 to the present. Emphasis on the transformation of the traditional heritage of China and Japan through revolution and modernization. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004561)
A survey of South America since independence from Iberia, highlighting the chaotic years of post-independence state building, the region's integration into the global capitalist economy in the late nineteenth century, and the age of mass politics and revolutionary ferment after 1930. The final weeks focus on South America's experience with military dictatorship and current transitions to democracy. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004495)
Origins, development, decline, and transitions in Bronze Age, Dark Age, and Archaic Age Greek civilization. Emphasis on the politics, social conditions, religion, philosophy, and culture of Archaic Greece and the early Persian Wars period (ca. 499-479 B.C.). 3 hours seminar. (004582)
Development, decline, and transitions associated with the evolution of the Classical period of ancient Greek civilization during the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. Primary emphasis on the politics, social conditions, religion, philosophy, and culture of the "Golden Age" of the fifth century B.C. 3 hours seminar. (004583)
Examination of the Greek world and the Persian Empire at the time of the rise of Macedon as a significant power under Philip II (r.359-336 B.C.E.) and during the life of Alexander the Great (r.336-323 B.C.E.). 3 hours seminar. (004584)
Political, social, and cultural history of the Eastern Mediterranean world and the Middle East from the death of Alexander the Great through the Roman conquest of Ptolemaic Egypt, i.e., Hellenistic civilization (323 to 30 B.C.E.). 3 hours seminar. (015754)
Political, social, and cultural history of Rome from its origins (within the world of pre-Roman Italy) down to Rome's emergence as the dominant power of the Mediterranean world. Emphasis is on the development of the Roman Republic's government, the nature of Roman imperialism, and social and cultural changes of the Second Century B.C.E. Time from of the courses is ca. 800-146 B.C.E. 3 hours seminar. (015803)
Political, social, and cultural history of Rome and the Roman Empire from the crises of the Later Roman Republic down to the emergence of the Augustan Principate and the rule of the Caesars. Emphasis is on the conflicts that culminated in the collapse of the Roman Republic, the restoration of order under Augustus, and the cultural achievements of the Age of Cicero and the Augustan Golden Age. Time frame for the course is 146 B.C.E. to 14 C.E. 3 hours seminar. (004586)
Political, social, and cultural history of the Roman Empire of the Caesars from the Julio-Claudian emperors (14-68 C.E.) to the end of the Severan Dynasty (435 C E.). Emphasis on the Julio-Claudian period, the achievements of Pax Romana, and the cultural transitions into Late Antiquity that emerged in the Second Century C.E. 3 hours seminar. (004587)
Examination of the Byzantine or East Roman Empire (630-1453) with emphasis on the sixth through ninth centuries and the Byzantine influence on Western Europe, Slavic Eastern Europe, and the Middle East. 3 hours seminar. (004591)
Consequences of the collapse of Carolingian rule, and the gradual shaping of a Christian Europe divided into autonomous regional political units. (Core course for Medieval Studies Minor.) 3 hours seminar. (004588)
New ideas about power and social structure in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Europe: Humanism, socio-political transformations, secular attitudes in art and society. 3 hours seminar. (004592)
The breakdown of religious consensus among Europeans; the people and directions of Reform; technology and the military revolution of the period; rulers, people, and the idea of revolution; the reconsolidating of a European elite. 3 hours seminar. (015755)
A survey of European history from the defeat of Napoleon to the outbreak of the First World War. The emphasis is on the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution, the growth of cities, the emergence of secular ideologies (liberalism, nationalism, and socialism), the reasons for European imperial expansion, the formation of a mass society, and the rise of the artistic and literary avant-garde. 3 hours seminar. (004601)
An examination of the history of European society, politics, and ideas in the twentieth century. The emphasis is on the causes and course of the First World War, the rise of communism in the Soviet Union and of fascism in Italy and Germany, the emergence of modern culture in the interwar period, the causes and course of the Second World War, and the reconstruction of postwar Europe. 3 hours seminar. (004602)
Political, social, and cultural history of the British Isles from the advent of the Tudors through the demise of the Stuarts. This course examines the transition from a medieval society to modern Britain, by focusing upon change and continuity in matters of government, religion, gender and the economy. 3 hours seminar. (004523)
Emphasis on cultural, institutional, and intellectual origins and developments. Carolingian Empire to France in the contemporary European community. 3 hours seminar. (015756)
Genesis and character of the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia (Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, Kassites, Assyrians, Chaldeans), Asia Minor (Hittites), Syro-Palestine (Ebla, Phoenicia, Israel), and Iran (Elamites, Medes, Persians). 3 hours seminar. (004585)
Problems associated with studying early Egyptian history; prehistory and the origins of Egyptian civilization; primary focus on Archaic and Old Kingdom Egypt, especially on the Age of the Pyramids. 3 hours lecture. (004654)
Political, social, religious, and cultural history of Egypt from the First Intermediate Period through the Late Period with principal emphasis on the Middle and New Kingdom Periods. The time frame of the course is ca. 2200 to 525 B.C.E. 3 hours lecture. (015847)
This course explores tradition and new trends in 18th and 19th century China, the Western impact and the Chinese response, the nationalist and the communist movements, changes in values and the society after 1949, and the ongoing economic reforms. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004661)
History of Japan from the end of exclusion (about 1853) to the present, with emphasis on the modernization of Japan and the road to Pearl Harbor. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004660)

Music

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A survey of the elements of music and diverse cultures and values in relation to music. Representative examples are drawn from the traditions of Europe, Africa, the Americas, and Asia, including classical, folk, and popular idioms. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (006053)
Prerequisites: MUSC 101.
The chronological development of western music from Greek origins to 1750 through a study of the literature, scores, recordings, films, and live performances. 3 hours lecture. (006151)
The historical and philosophical study of jazz from its African origins to the various forms in which it exists today. 3 hours lecture. (006184)
An in-depth study of Rock and Roll music and culture as it relates to the development and changes in American and world social orders. A study of the impact of Rock and Roll on social, economic, cultural and political structures. 3 hours lecture. (006186)
This course is also offered as AFAM 296.
A historical survey from the African heritage and Colonial times to the present. The types, forms, and styles of African American music are studied in relation to the African American experience. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000141)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 (or its equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
The chronological development of western music from 1750 to 1900 through a study of literature, musical scores, recordings, films and live performances. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. (006152)
Prerequisites: MUSC 202, MUSC 302, and faculty permission.
The chronological development of western music from 1900 to the present through the study of literature, musical scores, recordings, films, and live performances. 3 hours lecture. (006153)
Prerequisites: MUSC 102.
A survey of world traditions concentrating on Africa, Asia, and the Americas. For students with a background in music. 3 hours discussion. (006170)

Philosophy

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Western philosophical thought from the pre-Socratics through Stoicism, including movements and figures such as Pythagoreanism, Plato, Aristotle, and Epicureanism. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007181)
A philosophical analysis of major ideas in Chinese, Japanese, and Indian thought and their relationship to basic philosophical developments in the west. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (007185)
Origins and development of medieval philosophy, centering on its central themes as presented by Plotinus, St. Augustine, Proclus, John Scotus Erigena, Alfarabi, Avicenna, Averroes, Roger Bacon, St. Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. 3 hours discussion. (007184)
Western philosophical thought from the Renaissance through Kant, including Bacon, Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. 3 hours lecture. (007182)
Western philosophical thought from Kant through the twentieth century, including the phenomenological and analytic traditions in western philosophy. 3 hours lecture. (007183)
The phenomenological movement and its impact on philosophy, literature, and psychology, with attention to Husserl's views on mind, body, and intersubjectivity and Heidegger's ideas of being-in-the-world, authenticity, and death. 3 hours seminar. (007204)
An examination of existentialism from Kierkegaard and Nietzsche to Sartre, and de Beauvoir. An analysis of the basic forces, concepts, and figures which have shaped existentialism. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007205)
A philosophical study of the nature and significance of art, with references to relevant works. The course considers such themes as the beautiful, the sublime, comedy, tragedy and the social psychological dimensions of art as well as the periods of Romanticism, Modernism, Postmodernism. 3 hours lecture. (020624)

Religious Studies

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as HIST 261, MEST 261.
An introduction to Islam as a religious and cultural system. Topics include pre-Islamic Arabia, the Prophet Muhammad and the first Muslims, the Qur'an and shari'a, basic ritual practices, mysticism, theology and philosophy, Shi'ism, the visual and musical arts, women, modernism, "fundamentalism," and Islam in the USA. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004515)
This course is also offered as MJIS 204.
History of Judaism from biblical to modern times. A study of the literature, faith, and events that shaped Jewish life. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (005860)
This course is also offered as MJIS 205.
Traces of the historical development of a variety of Jewish sects, denominations, and cultures found in the Middle East, northern Africa, Europe, and North America from antiquity to modernity, with special emhasis on contemporary Jewish communities in the United States. Rituals, beliefs, and textual traditions that relate to the history of Judaism are surveyed, and the phenomenon of secular Judiasm are explored. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (020675)
An introduction to the basic features of the Christian worldview through an anlysis of its historical, ritual, doctrinal, ethical, and social-institutional dimensions. Special attention will be given to the diverse expressions of Christianity in different times and places and to its impact on human history, society, and culture. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (008145)
An exploration of the religious dimension of Chinese culture, with special attention to such figures as Lao Tzu, Confucius, and Mencius. 3 hours seminar. (008175)
A survey of Hinduism from its origins to the modern day, including philosophy, literature, popular temple worship, the role of feminine power, and modern fundamentalist and communal movement. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (008181)
A discussion of the roots and transformation of the Buddhist teachings in India, China, Japan, and Tibet. Special emphasis will be given to major trends and problems in contemporary Buddhism. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (008180)
An introduction to Greek mythology and its ancient Near Eastern parallels. The course focuses on the analysis of ancient Greek art and literature (including epic, hymns, lyric poetry, tragedy, and historiography). Topics explored include dying and rising gods, athletics and warfare, hospitality and gift exchange, initiation rituals and the afterlife, and the sex and gender roles of men and women. In addition, students consider Roman, Jewish, and Christian approaches to Greek myth and explore the impact of myth on modern art and film. 3 hours discussion. (008135)
This course is also offered as MEST 302.
This course introduces students to the sacred scripture and prophet of Islam. Students study the biography of Muhammad (570-632) and the text of the Qur'an by situating it within the context of Muhammad's life and career. By the end of the course, students are able to appreicate how devout Muslims view Muhammad and the Qur'an, as well as ask critical questions raised by modern scholars of religion. 3 hours lecture. (020263)
This course is also offered as MJIS 303.
An introduction to the Hebrew Bible (also known as the Old Testament of Christianity and the Tanakh of Judaism) in English translation. Readings from the Pentateuch, the prophetic books, and the hagiographa. The course emphasizes the analysis of the biblical books in their ancient Near Eastern contexts, the documentary hypotheses, Israelite history and religion, the formation of the biblical canon, and early Jewish and Christian scriptural interpretation. 3 hours lecture. (005858)
This course is also offered as MJIS 305.
An introduction to the thought, texts, and culture of Rabbinic Judaism in the first through sixth centuries. Students become familiar with the historical and cultural background of classical Rabbinic society, from its origins in the Pharisaic movement in Palestine (Eretz Israel) to its pinnacle in the academies of Sassanid Babylonia. This course explores the oral-literary tradition that produced the Talmud and Midrash while allowing students to experience the dialectical style of study associated with Rabbinic culture. 3 hours lecture. (020503)
This course covers the books of the Christian New Testament in the context of ancient Judaism and the world of the ancient Mediterranean. Who wrote the gospels and the epistles? Is there anti-Jewish prejudice in the New Testament? This class explores how Jesus was depicted, inquires whether the new Testament promotes or opposes Gnosticism, explains why the Christian apocrypha are not accepted as scripture, and also considers the relationship between the early Christian movement and ancient Greek mystery religions, the Dead Sea Scroll sect, Hellenistic Judaism, and/or Enoch traditions. 3 hours seminar. (008141)
This course is also offered as AIST 325.
A description and analysis of selected American Indian religions and philosophies of American Indian peoples of North America. The course will emphasize the Indians' spiritual relationship with nature as depicted in ceremonies, music, literature, and oral traditions. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000384)
This course explores how Christians, Buddhists, and Marxists have sought to answer questions about the nature and goals of human life and about the methods of individual and social transformation. Attention will be given to the diversity of ethical perspectives in the traditions on such topics as the human good, the ideal society, political and economic life, war and peace, the family, the meaning of freedom, and the nature of salvation. 3 hours discussion. (008165)

Theatre

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as MCGS 315.
A study of gender issues as they have been dealt with in plays and productions throughout the history of the theatre. The course will focus on the portrayal of women and men on stage as well as key figures who broke barriers in the areas of playwriting, acting, designing, and production. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (009520)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 (or its equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
Corequisites: Concurrent enrollment in THEA 350X is required.
The development of physical theatres, scenery, costuming, acting, directing, playwriting, and business procedures from the nineteeth century through today. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. (009232)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 (or its equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
Corequisites: Concurrent enrollment in THEA 350 is required.
Reading and discussion of selected plays compliment the study topics of Theatre History. 1 hour lecture. (009233)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 (or its equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
Corequisites: Concurrent enrollment in THEA 351X is required.
An introduction to all aspects of musical theatre, including history and development, major works, and production elements. Assignments will include reading, listening to, viewing, and critiquing musicals. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. (009521)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 (or its equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
Corequisites: Concurrent enrollment in THEA 351 is required.
Reading, listening and discussing selected plays and musical scores compliment the study topics of Musical Theatre History. 1 hour lecture. (009522)

Cultures of Asia, Africa, and the Americas: 3 units

Cultures of Asia

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Students examine the early civilizations of the Levant with foundations in the Early Bronze Age. The class focuses on Middle and Late Bronze Age period Canaan, the development of villages, towns, and societies during the periods of Canaanite and early Hebrew settlement. The focus of the course is with the cultural, demographic, political, and economic emergence of the nation of Israel with comparisons in the Old Testament and extra-biblical accounts of the period. Tools used in the examination include interpretation of evidence from archaeological excavations, historical materials, biblical and other textual sources, and area studies. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (020211)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
In-depth study of Chinese and Japanese visual arts (architecture, painting, sculpture, and other fine arts such as ceramics and woodblock prints) from the pre-historic to the nineteenth-century period. 3 hours lecture. (000844)
Cultural, economic, and political evolution of eastern Asia from antiquity to 1800. Emphasis on common traditional heritage of China and Japan. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004560)
Cultural, economic, and political evolution of eastern Asia from 1800 to the present. Emphasis on the transformation of the traditional heritage of China and Japan through revolution and modernization. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004561)
Genesis and character of the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia (Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, Kassites, Assyrians, Chaldeans), Asia Minor (Hittites), Syro-Palestine (Ebla, Phoenicia, Israel), and Iran (Elamites, Medes, Persians). 3 hours seminar. (004585)
This course explores tradition and new trends in 18th and 19th century China, the Western impact and the Chinese response, the nationalist and the communist movements, changes in values and the society after 1949, and the ongoing economic reforms. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004661)
An introduction to Japanese history and geography, as well as Japanese art forms, literature, philosophy, education, economy, customs, language, and politics. Course also includes a comparison of Japanese and American organizational theories. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (000993)
This course is taught in English. It examines a variety of Japanese films involving the following cultural themes: roles of men and women, society, history, politics, education, theater, sports, music, industry, comedy, etc. In the process, the students examine and analyze the myths and realities of Japanese people as portrayed in the films. Discussions are designed to increase students' awareness of intercultural communication, to foster their preparedness for functioning in the complex order of Japanese society. All films have English subtitles. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (020182)
An exploration of the religious dimension of Chinese culture, with special attention to such figures as Lao Tzu, Confucius, and Mencius. 3 hours seminar. (008175)
A survey of Hinduism from its origins to the modern day, including philosophy, literature, popular temple worship, the role of feminine power, and modern fundamentalist and communal movement. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (008181)
A discussion of the roots and transformation of the Buddhist teachings in India, China, Japan, and Tibet. Special emphasis will be given to major trends and problems in contemporary Buddhism. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (008180)

Cultures of Africa

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Case studies of traditional and contemporary cultures south of the Sahara Desert, focusing on the use of ethnographic data for the functional and ecological analysis of changing African societies. 3 hours lecture. (000525)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
An investigation of the arts and cultures of the African continent, with major emphasis upon the Negroid peoples south of the Sahara, the medieval kingdoms of the Sudan and the rain forest cultures and great civilizations of Ife, Benin, and the Congo, the sculpture, painting, body art, architecture, music, dance, belief systems, aural tradition of folklore, and reciprocal influences with other continents will be considered. 3 hours lecture. (000853)
Peoples, cultures, and economic systems of Africa before 1800, with emphasis on agricultural history, long-distance trade, state formation, and African religions. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004532)
Africa since 1800. Establishment and demise of European colonial regimes, African resistance to foreign domination, African political systems, dilemmas of socio-economic development, and gender differences in modern African life. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004533)
Problems associated with studying early Egyptian history; prehistory and the origins of Egyptian civilization; primary focus on Archaic and Old Kingdom Egypt, especially on the Age of the Pyramids. 3 hours lecture. (004654)
Political, social, religious, and cultural history of Egypt from the First Intermediate Period through the Late Period with principal emphasis on the Middle and New Kingdom Periods. The time frame of the course is ca. 2200 to 525 B.C.E. 3 hours lecture. (015847)

Cultures of the Americas

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as AIST 261.
Survey of Native North America with emphasis on U.S. tribes, their cultures, rituals, and institutions. Brief examination of pre-history. The focus is on historical and contemporary people. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000383)
Study of the Native peoples of South America, Mexico, and Central America from European contact to the present. The course emphasizes contemporary ethnography and interaction of indigenous people with colonialism and the modern nation-state. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (000522)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
A survey of ancient Mexican art and culture of formative, classic, conquest, including the Olmec, Teotihuacan, Zapotec, Mxtec, Classic Gulf Coast, Toltec, and Aztec. Sites discussed include El Tajin, La Venta, Monte Alban, Milta, Tula, and Tenochtitlan 3 hours lecture. (000841)
An investigation of the art of the ancient Maya of Mexico and Central America prior to European contact, from the Preclassic to Postclassic periods. The relationship of art to religious beliefs and practices will be explored, as well as the development of local styles associated with royal courts. Sites discussed include Tikal, Palenque, Copan, Uxmal, and Chichen Itza 3 hours lecture. (020618)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
This course is also offered as CHST 406.
A survey of Mexican art and culture from the Cortesian Conquest, the Colonial Period of monastery- and church-building, the Revolution of 1810, the Revolution of 1910, and the painters of the great revolutionary mural movement that followed, Rivera, Orozco, and Siqueriros, to contemporary artists who have tended toward international pluralism. Attention is given to the process of acculturation that produced the modern Mexican peoples, their national character, and their contemporary art. 3 hours lecture. (000842)
An investigation of the art of Peru and adjacent regions prior to European contact. The relationship of art to religious beliefs and practices, political ideologies, and the significance of styles and technologies are examined. Cultures surveyed include Chavin, Paracas, Nasca, Moche, Tiwanaku, and Inka, as well as the Northern Andean civilizations such as San Agustin. 3 hours lecture. (020619)
A survey of South America since independence from Iberia, highlighting the chaotic years of post-independence state building, the region's integration into the global capitalist economy in the late nineteenth century, and the age of mass politics and revolutionary ferment after 1930. The final weeks focus on South America's experience with military dictatorship and current transitions to democracy. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004495)
Prerequisites: SPAN 301.
Introduces students to the study of Hispanic literature and culture, and develops their skills in language comprehension and analysis of prose, poetry, and drama. The works studied will be short stories, full-length plays, and Hispanic-American narrative and lyric poetry. SPAN 341 and SPAN 342 are required of all majors and count as electives for the minor. Either fulfills the prerequisite for all other upper-division literature courses. 3 hours discussion. (009140)
Prerequisites: SPAN 301; SPAN 341 or SPAN 342; or faculty permission.
Readings and reports on literature of Mexico from pre-Columbian to contemporary literature. 3 hours discussion. (009168)

Global Cultures

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course examines Muslim cultures in the daily, national and global contexts in which Islam is practiced. Students read ethnography, fiction, history, and poetry in order to appreciate, respect and understand contemporary Islamic cultures. 3 hours lecture. (020635)
An examination of the data and major theories concerning the rise of civilizations, using as case studies early Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Mexico, and Peru. The significance of food production, ecology, writing, and the centralized state in the evolution of complex societies. 3 hours lecture. (000561)
An intensive survey of major issues and themes in non-Western literature. Students examine the interconnections between works of Western cultures and works from the literatures of Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (003470)
The study of modern world literature written English. Works may vary from semester to semester and focus on one region or culture (such as India, Africa, or the Caribbean), or several regions or cultures. 3 hours seminar. (003577)
Prerequisites: FREN 301, FREN 302, or FREN 303.
This course involves study of literature and society in Francophone Africa from the Maghreb (Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria) through Senegal and West Africa to Madagascar and the Reunion Island, New France (Quebec), the French Caribbean, the South Pacific (Tahiti), and Southeast Asia (Vietnam, Cambodia). 3 hours seminar. (003828)
This course is also offered as HIST 261, RELS 202.
An introduction to Islam as a religious and cultural system. Topics include pre-Islamic Arabia, the Prophet Muhammad and the first Muslims, the Qur'an and shari'a, basic ritual practices, mysticism, theology and philosophy, Shi'ism, the visual and musical arts, women, modernism, "fundamentalism," and Islam in the USA. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004515)
This course is also offered as HIST 362.
Introduction to some major aspects of society and culture in the Middle East, including the family, styles of living, roles of men and women, and Islamic religion. Examination of the nationalistic movements and politics in Turkey, Egypt, Iran, and Israel. Analyses of cultural and political issues, such as the Palestinian question, Arab-Israeli conflict, Islamic resurgence, and modernization. This course is designed to be a component of the Upper-Division Theme on Cross-Cultural Exploration. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004550)
A survey of the elements of music and diverse cultures and values in relation to music. Representative examples are drawn from the traditions of Europe, Africa, the Americas, and Asia, including classical, folk, and popular idioms. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (006053)
Prerequisites: MUSC 102.
A survey of world traditions concentrating on Africa, Asia, and the Americas. For students with a background in music. 3 hours discussion. (006170)
A philosophical analysis of major ideas in Chinese, Japanese, and Indian thought and their relationship to basic philosophical developments in the west. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (007185)

Non-European Cultures of the United States

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
Investigation of the traditional and contemporary arts and cultures of the Amerindian and Eskimo of the continental United States, Canada, and Alaska. Six major culture areas will be examined: the Arctic, Pacific Northwest, California, the Southwest, and Eastern Woodlands, and the florescent cultures of the Plains and Intermontane. Such problems as a definition of Indian Art, transoceanic contact, acculturation, and the moral and ethical questions posed by Indian Rights will be considered. 3 hours lecture. (000852)
This course is also offered as AFAM 251.
Introduction to African American literature, using a range of materials from past and present that may include slave and neo-slave narratives, oratory and sermons, poems, plays, and novels, songs and spirituals. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000135)
This course is also offered as AIST 252.
Study of the oral and written literature of the American Indian and of related historical and critical materials. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000377)
This course is also offered as AAST 253.
An introduction to various traditions and issues of the Asian American experience in literature. The course explores both early and contemporary novels, poems, and plays by writers of different genders, ethnicities, and cultures. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000002)
Survey of Chicano/Latino literature and of related historical and critical materials. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (003417)
This course is also offered as AFAM 296.
A historical survey from the African heritage and Colonial times to the present. The types, forms, and styles of African American music are studied in relation to the African American experience. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000141)
This course is also offered as AIST 325.
A description and analysis of selected American Indian religions and philosophies of American Indian peoples of North America. The course will emphasize the Indians' spiritual relationship with nature as depicted in ceremonies, music, literature, and oral traditions. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000384)
This course is also offered as CHST 354.
A study of the Chicano people as reflected in selected films and literature. Reading, discussions, and reports will be in English. This is a service course for non-majors and not elective for a BA degree or minor in Spanish. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (001977)

Note: Those who intend to focus on Classical Civilization should consider the following courses:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Students examine the early civilizations of the Levant with foundations in the Early Bronze Age. The class focuses on Middle and Late Bronze Age period Canaan, the development of villages, towns, and societies during the periods of Canaanite and early Hebrew settlement. The focus of the course is with the cultural, demographic, political, and economic emergence of the nation of Israel with comparisons in the Old Testament and extra-biblical accounts of the period. Tools used in the examination include interpretation of evidence from archaeological excavations, historical materials, biblical and other textual sources, and area studies. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (020211)
A comparative study of the prehistoric cultural traditions of the Mesoamerican and Andean regions. The Aztec, Inca, Maya, and their predecessors viewed as case studies in cultural evolution in the New World. 3 hours lecture. (000568)
An examination of the data and major theories concerning the rise of civilizations, using as case studies early Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Mexico, and Peru. The significance of food production, ecology, writing, and the centralized state in the evolution of complex societies. 3 hours lecture. (000561)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
A survey of ancient Mexican art and culture of formative, classic, conquest, including the Olmec, Teotihuacan, Zapotec, Mxtec, Classic Gulf Coast, Toltec, and Aztec. Sites discussed include El Tajin, La Venta, Monte Alban, Milta, Tula, and Tenochtitlan 3 hours lecture. (000841)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
In-depth study of the art and architecture of the Greek world during the Bronze Age, Aegean, Geometric, Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods. An emphasis will be placed upon understanding the development of the Greek artistic concepts, such as idealism and realism, within their cultural and political context. 3 hours lecture. (000858)
Prerequisites: ARTH 101 and ARTH 102 for art majors.
In-depth study of the art and architecture of the Roman world covering the Etruscan, Republican, Early and Late Imperial periods. An emphasis will be placed upon understanding the Roman character of Roman art and architecture, as well as domestic life through the arts as found at Pompeii, Herculaneus, etc. 3 hours lecture. (000860)
An investigation of the art of the ancient Maya of Mexico and Central America prior to European contact, from the Preclassic to Postclassic periods. The relationship of art to religious beliefs and practices will be explored, as well as the development of local styles associated with royal courts. Sites discussed include Tikal, Palenque, Copan, Uxmal, and Chichen Itza 3 hours lecture. (020618)
An investigation of the art of Peru and adjacent regions prior to European contact. The relationship of art to religious beliefs and practices, political ideologies, and the significance of styles and technologies are examined. Cultures surveyed include Chavin, Paracas, Nasca, Moche, Tiwanaku, and Inka, as well as the Northern Andean civilizations such as San Agustin. 3 hours lecture. (020619)
An introduction to the literature of ancient Greece and Rome. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (003411)
Introduction to the ancient Greek language and culture. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of reading, pronunciation, and composition in ancient Greek. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (020745)
Continuation of GREK 101. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of reading, pronunciation, and composition of ancient Greek. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (020746)
Origins, development, decline, and transitions in Bronze Age, Dark Age, and Archaic Age Greek civilization. Emphasis on the politics, social conditions, religion, philosophy, and culture of Archaic Greece and the early Persian Wars period (ca. 499-479 B.C.). 3 hours seminar. (004582)
Development, decline, and transitions associated with the evolution of the Classical period of ancient Greek civilization during the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. Primary emphasis on the politics, social conditions, religion, philosophy, and culture of the "Golden Age" of the fifth century B.C. 3 hours seminar. (004583)
Examination of the Greek world and the Persian Empire at the time of the rise of Macedon as a significant power under Philip II (r.359-336 B.C.E.) and during the life of Alexander the Great (r.336-323 B.C.E.). 3 hours seminar. (004584)
Political, social, and cultural history of the Eastern Mediterranean world and the Middle East from the death of Alexander the Great through the Roman conquest of Ptolemaic Egypt, i.e., Hellenistic civilization (323 to 30 B.C.E.). 3 hours seminar. (015754)
Political, social, and cultural history of Rome from its origins (within the world of pre-Roman Italy) down to Rome's emergence as the dominant power of the Mediterranean world. Emphasis is on the development of the Roman Republic's government, the nature of Roman imperialism, and social and cultural changes of the Second Century B.C.E. Time from of the courses is ca. 800-146 B.C.E. 3 hours seminar. (015803)
Political, social, and cultural history of Rome and the Roman Empire from the crises of the Later Roman Republic down to the emergence of the Augustan Principate and the rule of the Caesars. Emphasis is on the conflicts that culminated in the collapse of the Roman Republic, the restoration of order under Augustus, and the cultural achievements of the Age of Cicero and the Augustan Golden Age. Time frame for the course is 146 B.C.E. to 14 C.E. 3 hours seminar. (004586)
Political, social, and cultural history of the Roman Empire of the Caesars from the Julio-Claudian emperors (14-68 C.E.) to the end of the Severan Dynasty (435 C E.). Emphasis on the Julio-Claudian period, the achievements of Pax Romana, and the cultural transitions into Late Antiquity that emerged in the Second Century C.E. 3 hours seminar. (004587)
Examination of the Byzantine or East Roman Empire (630-1453) with emphasis on the sixth through ninth centuries and the Byzantine influence on Western Europe, Slavic Eastern Europe, and the Middle East. 3 hours seminar. (004591)
Genesis and character of the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia (Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, Kassites, Assyrians, Chaldeans), Asia Minor (Hittites), Syro-Palestine (Ebla, Phoenicia, Israel), and Iran (Elamites, Medes, Persians). 3 hours seminar. (004585)
Problems associated with studying early Egyptian history; prehistory and the origins of Egyptian civilization; primary focus on Archaic and Old Kingdom Egypt, especially on the Age of the Pyramids. 3 hours lecture. (004654)
Political, social, religious, and cultural history of Egypt from the First Intermediate Period through the Late Period with principal emphasis on the Middle and New Kingdom Periods. The time frame of the course is ca. 2200 to 525 B.C.E. 3 hours lecture. (015847)
Introduction to the Latin language and culture. Emphasis on the fundamental skills of reading, pronunciation and composition of Latin. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (005390)
Continuation of LATN 101. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of reading, pronunciation, and composition in Latin. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (020732)
Western philosophical thought from the pre-Socratics through Stoicism, including movements and figures such as Pythagoreanism, Plato, Aristotle, and Epicureanism. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007181)
An introduction to Greek mythology and its ancient Near Eastern parallels. The course focuses on the analysis of ancient Greek art and literature (including epic, hymns, lyric poetry, tragedy, and historiography). Topics explored include dying and rising gods, athletics and warfare, hospitality and gift exchange, initiation rituals and the afterlife, and the sex and gender roles of men and women. In addition, students consider Roman, Jewish, and Christian approaches to Greek myth and explore the impact of myth on modern art and film. 3 hours discussion. (008135)
This course covers the books of the Christian New Testament in the context of ancient Judaism and the world of the ancient Mediterranean. Who wrote the gospels and the epistles? Is there anti-Jewish prejudice in the New Testament? This class explores how Jesus was depicted, inquires whether the new Testament promotes or opposes Gnosticism, explains why the Christian apocrypha are not accepted as scripture, and also considers the relationship between the early Christian movement and ancient Greek mystery religions, the Dead Sea Scroll sect, Hellenistic Judaism, and/or Enoch traditions. 3 hours seminar. (008141)

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult the program coordinator for specific information.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  1. You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  2. You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  3. Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  4. Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  5. Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  6. Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

To be eligible for Honors in the Humanities Program, students must have completed at least 30 units of course work in the major with grades that place them in the top 5% of Humanities majors. Students will enroll for 6 units of credit in HUMN 499H.

Catalog Cycle:11