Skip to Side Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Accessibility Settings

The Bachelor of Arts in Child Development

Strategic Learning Priorities

Students in the child development program will become knowledgeable in six areas:

1. Foundations of Child Development

Students will understand the theoretical, empirical, and philosophical foundations of the discipline. In addition, students will apply their knowledge while working with children, families, and professionals.

2. Child and Environmental Assessment and Study

Students will understand, perform, and appreciate multiple forms of child assessment. Students will be able to use qualitative and quantitative methods of assessing children. They will be able to use the information to help identify a child's strengths and develop, implement, and evaluate plans of intervention to resolve areas of need.

3. Programs for Children and Families

Students will understand model programs for both children and families and implement developmentally appropriate curriculum activities. Students will evaluate the impact and efficacy of these programs for children, families, and communities.

4. Professionalism

Students will understand professionalism by demonstrating knowledge, attitudes, and skills of those individuals who are committed to understanding and working with children and families. They will demonstrate mastery of communication (reading, writing, listening, computer, and speaking skills), leadership, research, assessment and evaluation, and collaboration skills.

5. Critical Thinking

Students will demonstrate an understanding of and ability to apply scientific methods of thinking (including logic and empirical reasoning) about children, families, and their well being. Students will differentiate between their personal and subjective theories about children's development and scientific theories of development rooted in empirical research and based on best practices. In addition, students will demonstrate both currency in information technology appropriate to the discipline and an understanding of the ethical use of such technology.

6. Developmental Context

Students will understand the multiple environmental contexts in which children grow and develop. Students will appreciate and interpret how social class, parents, families, peers, types of children's programs, culture, societal changes, and communities influence the course of development.

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Degree MAPs page in the University Catalog or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Literacy Requirement:

See Mathematics and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog. Writing proficiency in the major is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of a course in your major which has been designated as the Writing Proficiency (WP) course for the semester in which you take the course. Students who earn below a C- are required to repeat the course and earn a C- or higher to receive WP credit. See the Class Schedule for the designated WP courses for each semester. You must pass ENGL 130I or JOUR 130I (or equivalent) with a C- or higher before you may register for a WP course.

Course Requirements for the Major: 55 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree. Additional required courses, depending upon the selected option or advising pattern, are outlined following the major core program requirements.

Major Core Program: 40 units

Foundation Core: 6 units

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Registration in CHLD 251 for Child Development majors and minors.
A study of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of children from conception through adolescence. The course examines genetic, biological, and environmental influences including cross-cultural issues. Scheduled observation in the Associated Students Children's Center/Child Development Laboratory is met through enrollment in CHLD 251. 3 hours discussion. (001440)
Prerequisites: concurrent registration or prior completion of CHLD 250 or CHLD 252.
This course includes acquisition and application of basic observation skills regarding children's physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development. (Required for students enrolled in CHLD 250.) 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (001441)

Core I: 9 units

Must be completed prior to taking CHLD 392 and CHLD 440.

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252, CHLD 251.
This course examines the role of curriculum in effective learning programs for children's development. Students gain skills in applying knowledge of children's growth and development to appropriate experiences in the creative arts, play, math, science, literacy, and language. Planning, implementing, and evaluating curriculum activities are key components of the course. Students in the class work directly with children in an approved community program approximately 3 hours a week. 3 hours discussion. (001447)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; GE Pathway Foundation Quantitative Reasoning (MATH 110, MATH 111 for Liberal Studies majors); CHLD 250 or CHLD 252, CHLD 251.
Students learn the fundamentals of scientific methodology, increase their knowledge of qualitative research methods, and acquire quantitative skills in measurement and statistical evaluation. These skills are applied through reviewing, evaluating, and communicating research. Students also identify the major dimensions of research strategies used in child development and related fields. 2 hours seminar, 2 hours activity. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (001448)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An examination of the status, needs, and trends in the health of America's children, including selected racial/ethnic groups. The course includes an overview of physical growth and development from the prenatal period to early adolescence; discussion of common health problems, causes, symptoms, treatment, and prevention; and addresses selected health issues such as diet, physical activity, stress, violence, drugs, sexuality, and environmental risks. An overview of current and potential health services and prevention programs for children is included. 3 hours discussion. (004441)
Addresses major health issues affecting the child, including, but not limited to, health promotion and disease prevention, nutrition, substance use and abuse, and sexuality. Overview of health instruction framework for California public schools. Fulfills the state health education requirement for a preliminary teaching credential. 3 hours discussion. (004393)
Physiological, social, and psychological factors affecting food intake are examined, as well as relationships of nutrients to health throughout life. Sustainable food practices are explored. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (004273)

Core II: 13 units

Must be completed prior to taking CHLD 492 or CHLD 495; CHLD 440 may be taken concurrently with the Professional Core.

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.
The inheritance, expression, and evolution of the genetic material in humans. Topics include genetic engineering, gene therapy, prenatal diagnosis, cancer, the human genome project, genetic influences on human behavior, such as homosexuality and mental illness, and the social and ethical consequences of the new technologies. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (001140)
Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.
Basic biological principles, including the scientific method, reproduction, development, physiology, and anatomy. The biological basis of childhood diseases, immunity, nutrition, issues of health and well-being, and the relevance of biological information in social, political, and ethical decision making regarding children. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (001151)

3 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252, CHLD 251, CHLD 282, CHLD 353, junior standing.
This course examines and appraises current and professional issues affecting the field of child development. Cultural and political influences on the practices of professionals in the field are explored and analyzed. 3 hours lecture. (020216)
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252, CHLD 251, CHLD 282, CHLD 353; NFSC 100 or HCSV 450; junior standing; faculty permission.
This course emphasizes early childhood curriculum design and practice in a supervised student teaching experience in the Associated Students Child Development Laboratory (ASCDL). Students plan and implement a developmentally effective program for young children, practice the role of teachers, assess children's developmental progress, and evaluate their own teaching/learning effectiveness and professional development. Enrollment is limited. 2 hours activity, 9 hours laboratory. (001455)
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252, CHLD 251, CHLD 282, CHLD 353, and GE math with a grade of C- or higher.
This course provides an overview of child and family assessment. The course offers the student both research-based theory and practical applications in these areas. Students apply the knowledge gained during class sessions and readings to relevant assigned projects and papers. 3 hours lecture. (001459)

Core III: 12 units

The Child: 6 units

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
This topical course is designed for students who wish to develop a broader and deeper understanding of children's gender and sexuality development. Students study multiple theoretical explanations of gender and sexuality development, and learn how biological, social, cultural, and cognitive influences impact concepts of gender and sexuality. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education Capstone course. (021162)
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252 or PSYC 355.
This course studies characteristic developmental changes in and environmental influences on human infants from conception to approximately two years of age. Special emphasis is on sensory-perceptual abilities, social-emotional interactions, and cognitive developmental processes. Guided observations of infants required. 3 hours discussion. (001446)
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252 or PSYC 355.
This class examines the physical, cognitive, emotional, and psychosocial aspects of growth during the school-aged years (ages 5 through 12), as well as contextual influences (e.g., family, school, peer group) on children's development. Particular attention is paid to the implications of developmental patterns for those who work with school-aged children. 3 hours lecture. (001449)
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252 or PSYC 355.
This course provides a broad research and theory-based overview of physical, cognitive, emotional, social, moral, and identity development during adolescence. An ecological framework is used to examine the influence of sociocultural contexts, ethnicity, gender, family, peers, and school settings on adolescent experience and development. 3 hours discussion. (001461)
Examination of psychological factors involved in the learning processes of children. 3 hours lecture. (007884)
Physical, mental, social, and emotional factors of human growth and development from infancy through adolescence. Supervised experience working with children is strongly encouraged. 3 hours lecture. (007925)
Prerequisites: PSYC 355 or equivalent.
Consideration of theory and research associated with developmental processes. Emphasis upon cognitive and social development, with attention to perceptual, language, and intellectual development and to the socialization processes. 3 hours seminar. (007926)

The Family: 3 units

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This is an introductory course to marriage and family, including psychological, physiological, and social aspects of close personal relationships. The topics include dating, courtship, marriage, family life, dual career marriages, single parenting, and other contemporary issues. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (001443)
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252 or CHLD 255 or PSYC 355.
The course examines the connections among child development, families, and public policies. Discussions focus on the role of policy in addressing social problems that pertain to children and families and the consequences policies may have for families and for children's social, physical, cognitive, and emotional development. Particular attention is given to such issues as poverty, education, childcare, and welfare reform. 3 hours lecture. (001450)
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252 or CHLD 255 or PSYC 355, faculty permission.
This course is an advanced study of the interpersonal relationships among family members. Topics of reading and discussion include theories and research on family structure and function, family crises, child raising patterns, family finances, and other related topics as per instructor choice. 3 hours discussion. (001462)
A philosophical investigation of the moral and legal dimensions of parenting. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (007212)
This course examines the family as an institution and as a personal and intimate arena of meaning and interaction. With an emphasis on the U.S. and their own experiences, students examine issues of race/ethnicity, sex/gender, and social class; historical changes in family structure and function; and power relations within the family and society at large. 3 hours lecture. (008961)

The Society and Culture: 3 units

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
To address the challenge of understanding development in its many contexts and manifestations, this course provides a global investigation of critical issues influencing the lives of children. This course focuses on familial and societal influences on children's development and explores how the concept of childhood is shaped by cultural and social practices and policies. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (021161)
Examination of social and cultural influences on emotional, social, and intellectual development. Specific emphasis on children raised in lower socio-economic environments as well as children of American Indian, Mexican-American, and black cultures. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007889)
This course is also offered as MCGS 341 .
This course focuses on the importance and various influences of culture on human behavior. Beginning with an examination of theoretical definitions of culture, the course covers a broad range of research that highlights the contributions of cross-cultural psychology to the understanding of human behavior within and between cultures. In addition, conceptual, methodological, and practical issues in cross-cultural research and applications are covered. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (005638)
This course explores the relationship between the individual and society by focusing on how people create and sustain their daily lives. The emphasis is on interacations with others, and the effect of individual behavior upon group dynamics. Socialization, identities and the self, emotions, conformity, and communication are explored. 3 hours lecture. (008994)

Professional Core: 6 units

Before you enroll in the professional core, you must complete Core I and Core II as described above; CHLD 440 may be taken concurrently.

1 course required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: BIOL 303 or BIOL 318; CHLD 392, senior standing, faculty permission.
This class is a guided internship for majors in Child Development. Based on individually determined internship learning objectives, students select a community-based agency placement that matches their career interest in children from birth through 18 years of age and/or their families. Students spend a minimum of 6 hours a week in their internship placement for 12 weeks. Enhanced Internet course; WebCT access is required for this course. 1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity. (001467)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: BIOL 303 or BIOL 318; CHLD 392, senior standing, faculty permission.
This capstone seminar integrates the perspectives of various disciplines concerned with the developing child. Its emphasis is on physical, cognitive, personality, and social development of the child in relationship to the family, community, and society. From a research framework, the topics include program practices, professional ethics, collaboration, case management, effective communication, leadership styles, self evaluation, and professional responsibilities. Students also complete comprehensive portfolios as part of the course requirements. 3 hours seminar. (001468)
Prerequisites: BIOL 303 or BIOL 318; CHLD 392, senior standing, acceptance in undergraduate honor program, faculty permission.
This capstone seminar integrates the perspectives of various disciplines concerned with the developing child. Its emphasis is on physical, cognitive, personality, and social development of the child in relationship to the family, community, and society. From a research framework, the topics include program practices, professional ethics, collaboration, case management, effective communication, leadership styles, self evaluation, and professional responsibilities. Students also complete comprehensive portfolios as part of the course requirements. 3 hours seminar. (001469)

Depth Core: 9 units

See academic advisor for recommended courses focused on student interests and professional preparation.

9 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing or faculty permission.
An exploration of art-making skills; developing creative, standards-based art lessons and units; and enhancing understanding of theory, history and practice in art education Pre-Kindegarten (P) through Eighth (8) grade levels. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (000803)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ARTS 493 or faculty permission.
An exploration of standards-based art lessons and units; and understanding of theory, history and practice in art education at the high school (9-12) level. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (000808)
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252, CHLD 251.
This course focuses on the role of the program administrator in various types of licensed child development facilities. Topics include programming, fiscal oversight, licensing regulations, personnel decisions, legal issues, and management aspects of children's programs. 3 hours seminar. (001463)
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252, CHLD 251.
This course offers opportunities to gain skills and knowledge about supervising adults in the workplace. Topics include interpersonal communication techniques, adult learning theory, leadership skills, professional collaboration, and personnel assessment in the early childhood education field. 3 hours lecture. (001465)
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252, CHLD 251, CHLD 282, CHLD 353; NFSC 100 or HCSV 450; faculty permission.
Independent study resulting in a piece of scholarly or creative work involving substantial research to be completed and publicly presented. This will be the first course taken in the year-long honors program in the major and is open only to undergraduate honors students. 9 hours supervision. (001472)
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252, CHLD 251, senior standing.
This course is the study of inter-relationships among staff, parents, and children in child development programs. It includes knowledge of parent education, communication techniques, staff management and relationships, observation of parent meetings, and other aspects of program functioning. 3 hours seminar. (001460)
Prospective teachers examine socio-political issues of education relative to current demographics of California schools, integration of multicultural education, and promotion of social justice. Candidates identify, analyze, and minimize personal and institutional bias and explore the complexities of living and teaching in a pluralistic, multicultural society. Candidates identify barriers English Learners experience in becoming full participants in the school program and strategies for assisting students in overcoming these barriers. 3 hours lecture. (002977)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130.
A study of technical writing and presentation skills in business and scientific environments, including audience analyses, writing processes, genres of technical and business discourse, visual communication, collaboration, professional responsibility, clear and correct expression. Students write and revise several documents and give oral reports. 3 hours discussion. (003453)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Knowledge and skill development in writing grant proposals for health and community services. Skills in researching government, foundation, and corporate funding opportunities. Diversifying nonprofit income through other fundraising strategies. 3 hours seminar. (001618)
Analyzes fundamental principles upon which school, community, and population health are based. The contributions of federal, state, and local organizations to national goals for health promotion and disease prevention are examined. Explores fundamental social, political, organizational, and behavioral aspects of public health in school, community, and worksite settings. 3 hours lecture. (001575)
This course is also offered as WMST 368 .
This course represents an overview of health care issues faced by women throughout the life cycle. The course begins an examination of scientific inquiry and the study of disease in women. Then, using sociological, political, and behavioral sciences, the roles, rights, and responsibilities of women in the health care system are assessed. The course concludes with a biological review of the female body and specific health care problems common to women. This course encompasses a woman-centered philosophy which encourages women's active participation in their health care decisions. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (004381)
Using a combination of theory and application, this course focuses on the human side of organizations, including issues of 1) making good decisions, 2) enhancing performance, 3) steering through a turbulent global environment, 4) combining and unifying multiple business functions and 5) enabling change. Students gain an understanding of management and how and why organizations are structured. The themes of quality, technology, ethics, and adaptation are emphasized. 3 hours lecture. (005704)
This course surveys human resource management practices needed for effective performance by every manager and employee. The focus of the course is on processes used to effectively recruit, select, develop, evaluate, reward, and ensure the safety of employees in order to attract and retain the best possible workforce in any organization. This course provides students with an understanding of workforce diversity, investigates ethical issues, and explores the international context of HRM. 3 hours lecture. (005690)
Analysis of sequential concepts necessary for understanding the structural elements of music. Development of skills needed to promote musicality in children. 3 hours discussion. (006136)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: MUSC 326, faculty permission.
Recommended for Child Development majors and Liberal Studies majors concentrating in Early Childhood Education. Nurturing musicality in the young child, with emphasis on the role of music in the development of the whole child. 3 hours discussion. (006166)
This course is designed to present a knowledge base of physical education that includes the analysis of movement skills and movement patterns, physical fitness, and how physical education is inherently linked to health and wellness. Also studied in this course will be children's motor development and how emotional, cognitive, and social growth characteristics influence motor development. 3 hours lecture. (006877)
A study of common disabilities found across the lifespan. Discussions are held about the historical and philosophical basis for adapted physical activity, and the impact of state and federal legislation. Analysis of the roles and responsibilities of the adapted physical education specialist and the inclusive educational environment also are examined. This course is applicable to all disciplines dealing with the disabled. 3 hours seminar. (015911)
Learn techniques of legal research and writing. Write briefs, memoranda, and other legal documents based on library research with cases, treatises, law reviews, statutes, regulations, etc. 3 hours lecture. (007581)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
See description below. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (007621)
Prerequisites: PSYC 381 or PSYC 382, senior or graduate standing, faculty permission.
Theory of individual and family counseling and laboratory practice in individual counseling. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007976)
A study and critical examination of traditional and modern literature appropriate for the elementary school; criteria for curriculum development; teaching literature to children. Recommended for Multiple Subject credential candidates. 3 hours seminar. (003115)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Development of the skills for effective dramatization of literature in the elementary classroom or children's theatre, including creative dramatics, storytelling, oral interpretation and group readings. 3 hours discussion. (009224)
This course is also offered as WMST 230 .
Taking an in-depth look, this course explores women's lives in today's world across categories of class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, disability, and age. Students also discuss such topics as gender, body politics, violence against women, poverty, religion, and power as they relate to women. Special attention is given to social activism and emerging policies here in the U.S. and elsewhere. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (008968)
This course explores the history and experiences of women in the workplace and how family roles intersect with both paid and unpaid work, in and out of the home in the United States. Considered are the impacts of race, class, gender, and globalization on poverty, child and elder care, and workplace equity. International comparisons are drawn. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (008960)
Prerequisites: SOCI 384 recommended.
This course examines marginalized, deviant, and criminally active youth. Students consider how teen experiences and behaviors are labeled and treated differently throughout society. Social, historical, and legal perspectives are used to understand the impact of the juvenile justice system, policies, and trends on the lives of American youth. 3 hours lecture. (009018)
This is a survey course recommended for students interested in all types of exceptional learners and a prerequisite to professional preparation programs in the Department of Professional Studies in Education. Content includes (1) an overview of the characteristics, identification, and educational needs of special populations, (2) social, familial, biological, historical, cultural, economic, political, and legal contexts in which special education occurs, and (3) characteristics of effective programs. Includes a service learning experience. 3 hours lecture. (003010)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Recommended: PSYC 355 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently).
Study of current concepts, principles, and issues related to exceptional development. The focus is on children with various exeptionalities, e.g., behavior disorders, learning disabilities, communication disorders, physical impairments, motor and neurological impairments, and gifts or talents, to gain a better understanding of human diversity. Exceptional children are studied within the context of their families, as well as emphasizing the support services necessary to facilitate optimum development. 3 hours lecture. (007947)
Prerequisites: SPED 343. Recommended: senior standing.
This course focuses on the principles and practices of elementary school instruction in language arts, fine arts, mathematics, science, and social studies and national and state curriculum and subject matter standards. It includes selecting appropriate instructional strategies, lesson planning, assessment, service learning, writing goals and objectives, and methods for enhancing critical thinking and content area reading skills to meet the educational needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students. 3 hours lecture. (009295)
Prerequisites: SPED 343, SPED 569. Senior standing is recommended.
Roles and relationships of families and professionals involved in the special education service delivery process. Emphasis on developing professional communication with administrators, regular education personnel, specialists, paraprofessionals, district personnel. Pre-referral services and interactions, student study/student success teams, IEP/ITP teams and co-teaching models. For child development majors, an additional unit of intership credit is recommended. 2 hours seminar. (009297)
Prerequisites: SPED 343, SPED 569. Recommended: senior standing.
This course focuses on the management of safe and effective learning environments and facilitates positive self-esteem and self-advocacy for all learners. It includes knowledge of behavior management models, varying communication styles that impact learning and strategies for promoting behavior that is positive and self-regulatory. 2 hours seminar. (009298)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of SPED 343.
Students enrolled in this course will participate in introductory field experiences in general and special education classroom settings. The course will include guided observations and exposure to varied educational environments and practices in teaching to diversity, and participating in special education and integrated regular education settings, preschool to adult levels. Settings include programs in schools and agencies that provide services to students of six categories of exceptionalities, including those from culturally and linguistically diverse populations. 3 hours discussion. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. (015978)
This course identifies groups within American society which have a high risk of disenfranchisement. Societal responses established to reduce the impact of inequitable distribution of goods, services, and opportunities based on economic, medical, educational, generational, gender, and legal scarcity are studied. Issues are examined from historical and contemporary perspectives. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (009411)
Corequisite: SWRK 302 for SWRK majors only.
This course presents a framework for understanding and openly interacting with people from diverse backgrounds that compose the rich mosaic of the United States. The class is designed to promote ethnic-sensitive interpersonal relationships. Diverse people studied are distinguished by issues of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, disability, religion/spirituality, generation, and national origin. Historical and cultural experiences shaping their lives and current reality are examined. The overall goal is for students to develop high regard for the worth and dignity of all people. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. (009415)
Corequisites: SWRK 200 for majors only.
Using a systems framework and selected human behavior theories across the lifespan, the biological, social, psychological, and cultural influences on individuals, families, and groups are investigated. Particular emphasis is given to ethnic and cultural diversity and promoting student self-reflection across generations and cultural competence. 3 hours lecture. (009416)
Acquaints students with the relevant history and concepts of child welfare. Examines abuse, neglect, molestation, prostitution, pornography, day care, teen pregnancies, foster care, intergenerational issues, and adoptions. Focuses on the application of generalist social work knowledge, values, and skills, and the problem-solving process to child welfare practices. Required for Title IV-E students. 3 hours lecture. (009425)

Professional Standards and Disqualification:

The child development degree signifies a readiness to begin professional work in areas requiring trust and high ethical standards. You are expected to meet ethical and professional standards set by the profession and the agencies with which you may serve as an intern. Should it be determined that you do not meet such standards, you may be disqualified from fulfilling the advanced internship of the major and thus be prevented from completing the child development major.

The professional standards include the following:

1. Honoring the National Association for Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Code of Ethics and the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) Code of Ethics.

2. Meeting the expectations of field agencies and programs which provide internships.

3. Avoiding behavior that suggests potential harm to clients, colleagues, or themselves.

Please consult with the program office for more complete information regarding these standards.

Obtaining a Child Development Permit

If you are interested in teaching or directing in a child development center with young children (0-8 years of age), you may want to obtain a Child Development (CD) Permit. Having a CD Permit may be required or highly recommended for certain types of centers (e.g., Title 5 Programs, child development programs funded by the State Department of Education, Head Start). For more information about obtaining a CD Permit, contact your academic advisor or the Child Development Program office.

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Visit the Child Development Program Office for assignment to an undergraduate advisor.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  1. You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  2. You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  3. Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  4. Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  5. Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  6. Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

Honors in Child Development

In addition to the requirements for all Honors in the Major programs listed above, specific requirements for Honors in Child Development include:

1. Successful completion of CHLD 353.

2. Faculty recommendation.

3. Students admitted to the Honors in the Major program in child development will enroll in CHLD 499H the first semester of their senior year and CHLD 495H the second semester. It is recommended that CHLD 499H be taken concurrently with CHLD 392. A public presentation of the completed project will take place during the second semester. Students must earn at least a B grade in both CHLD 499H and CHLD 495H.

Catalog Cycle:12