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The Bachelor of Arts in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Degree MAPs page in the University Catalog or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Literacy Requirement:

See Mathematics and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog. Writing proficiency in the major is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of a course in your major which has been designated as the Writing Proficiency (WP) course for the semester in which you take the course. Students who earn below a C- are required to repeat the course and earn a C- or higher to receive WP credit. See the Class Schedule for the designated WP courses for each semester. You must pass ENGL 130I or JOUR 130I (or equivalent) with a C- or higher before you may register for a WP course.

Course Requirements for the Major: 51 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree.

See a major advisor for required course sequence.

16 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A survey of the normal processes of communication and of the disorders associated with parameters of communication (i.e., articulation, language, voice, fluency, and audition). The course will also include an overview of the professional aspects of speech-language pathology and audiology. 3 hours discussion. (002144)
The beginning course is taught using a conversational approach. Students acquire knowledge about cultural and linguistic aspects of deafness and ASL, as well as attain receptive and expressive skills that will enable them to communicate with individuals using ASL. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. This is an approved General Education course. (002149)
The study of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), with emphasis on training students to transcribe speech accurately using the IPA. Students also develop an understanding of phonetic theory and principles. 3 hours lecture. (002155)
Prerequisite: CMSD 220, CMSD 290, CMSD 362.
This course provides students with the opportunity for introductory study of the etiology, symptomatology, evaluation, and treatment of articulation and phonology disorders. 3 hours lecture. (020627)
Prerequisites: CMSD 220, CMSD 290, CMSD 362.
This course provides students with the opportunity for introductory study of the etiology, symptomatology, evaluation, and rehabilitation of voice and fluency disorders. A thorough exploration of laryngeal and velar anatomy and biomechanics will be covered, and measurement of objective and subjective vocal parameters are discussed in detail. Lectures and readings include a comprehensive examination of methodologies for intervention across the lifespan. 3 hours lecture. (020626)
Prerequisites: CMSD 220, CMSD 290, CMSD 362.
Lecture and discussion of normal developmental processes associated with language acquisition. It includes genetic, cultural, and social aspects. Theories of acquisition are discussed. 3 hours lecture. (002151)
This course provides undergraduate students with a basic understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the speech production and perception mechanisms. Empasis is on systems involved with respiration, phonation, articulation, audition, and neurology. The information presented in this class is essential and will lay the foundation for continued learning in communication sciences and disorders. 3 hours lecture. (002152)
Prerequisites: CMSD 220, CMSD 290, CMSD 362.
The student will be provided with an understanding of the acoustic attributes of speech and the basic principles of psychoacoustics, physics, and speech perception. 3 hours lecture. (002153)
Prerequisites: CMSD 321, CMSD 341, CMSD 351, CMSD 363.
Description and remedial techniques for the following organic disorders: cleft palate, laryngeal, articulation (apraxia, dysarthria), cerebral palsy, and aphasia. The relationships among the various disorders, with attention to multi-handicapped individuals will be studied. In addition, the available services from related fields will be examined. 3 hours lecture. (002145)
Prerequisites: CMSD 431, CMSD 440, CMSD 451, CMSD 488.
This course provides students the opportunity for introductory study of basic diagnostic procedures for formal and informal evaluation of communication disorders. A thorough exploration of standardized test construction and administration is covered, as well as less formal assessment tools such as language samples. The information presented includes a comprehensive examination of methodologies children and adults. Important issues regarding the assessment of non-native speakers of English and speakers of other languages are also discussed. 3 hours lecture. (002158)
Prerequisites: CMSD 321, CMSD 341, CMSD 351, CMSD 363.
This course provides a basic understanding of audiologic tests and procedures and of causes and effects of various hearing disorders. 3 hours lecture. (002159)
Prerequisites: CMSD 431, CMSD 440, CMSD 451, CMSD 488.
This course deals with the implications of hearing loss on communication, education, and vocation, as well as psycho-social ramifications. Evaluation and remediation, including amplification and assistive devices, are discussed. 3 hours discussion. (002160)
Prerequisites: CMSD 321, CMSD 341, CMSD 351, CMSD 363.
Lecture and discussion of types of language disabilities seen in children. The focus of this course is remediation. 3 hours lecture. (002164)
Prerequisites: CMSD 431, CMSD 440, CMSD 451, CMSD 488.
This course emphasizes development of knowledge and skills prerequisite to clinical practice in speech-language pathology. Lecture and discussion on general treatment principles (learning and teaching), disorder-specific treatment techniques, report writing techniques, clinical problem-solving, cultural issues in treatment, professional requirements and ethics, etc. Direct observation of therapy is required. 3 hours lecture. (002167)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; CMSD 321, CMSD 341, CMSD 351, CMSD 363.
This course enables students to write clearly and effectively, using APA style; demonstrate knowledge of the basic processes involved in research in communicative disorders; integrate research principles into evidence-based clinical practice; and demonstrate entry-level skills in reading, understanding, and evaluating research in communication sciences and disorders. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (002169)
Physical, mental, social, and emotional factors of human growth and development from infancy through adolescence. Supervised experience working with children is strongly encouraged. 3 hours lecture. (007925)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing.
This course provides students with knowledge of a variety of aspects of aging that impact the communication process: changes in social, economic status, cognitive, linguistic, sensory, and motor abilities. The class is conducted in seminar style, with research-based student presentations and guest lectures. 3 hours discussion. (002165)
An introduction to the psychological processes and phenomena associated with middle and older adulthood. 3 hours lecture. (004457)

Other courses may be substituted upon approval of your advisor.

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  1. You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  2. You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  3. Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  4. Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  5. Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  6. Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

Catalog Cycle:12