Skip to Side Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Accessibility Settings

The Master of Arts in Teaching International Languages

The MA in Teaching International Languages promotes the study of languages and cultures as an integral part of a world class education in a global society. Course work focuses on linguistic, cultural, and pedagogical knowledge and its applications in teaching foreign languages and TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages). The program prepares professionals for a broad spectrum of cultural contexts and instructional settings in the United States and abroad.

This degree is offered by the School of Education as a 36-unit interdisciplinary program for graduate students interested in the effective teaching and learning of international languages. By integrating course work from Education, English, and Foreign Languages and Literatures with offerings from international studies and other related areas, this interdisciplinary degree encompasses studies in linguistics, composition, literature, language, culture, and foreign/second language education. The program promotes the development of knowledgeable, reflective, inquiry-oriented professionals prepared to teach foreign languages (including English as a foreign language), and English as a second language to adolescent and adult learners so that students from all nations can fully participate in the multilingual, interdependent communities of the twenty-first century. Required courses and electives provide the theoretical and practical foundations essential for foreign language teachers, foreign/second language college and university instructors, and other professionals teaching world languages. It is also ideal for educators interested in National Board Certification specific to English as a New Language and World Languages.

Foundation Courses

ENGL 371, Principles of Language, is a prerequisite for all students. ENGL 375, Introduction to English Grammar, is a prerequisite for some of the courses listed in Language Studies Pattern A, and is strongly recommended for all students within that pattern.

Course Requirements for the Master's Degree: 36 units

Continuous enrollment is required. A maximum of 9 semester units of transfer and/or CSU Chico Open University course work may be applied toward the degree.

Graduate Time Limit:

All requirements for the degree are to be completed within seven years of the end of the semester of enrollment in the oldest course applied toward the degree. See Master's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements.

Prerequisites for Admission to Conditionally Classified Status:

1. An acceptable baccalaureate from an accredited institution, or an equivalent approved by the Office of Graduate Studies. Candidates with a foreign language emphasis are expected to hold an appropriate degree or credential, or to demonstrate comparable proficiency in the target language as assessed by the Foreign Languages and Literatures Department.

2. Satisfactory grade point average as specified in "Admission to Master's Degree Programs."

3. An undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 in the last 30 units, and 2.75 in the last 60 units.

4. Approval by the Teaching International Languages Program and the Office of Graduate Studies. Students admitted to conditionally classified status must also file an approved, preliminary program plan with the Graduate Coordinator and request advancement to classified status upon completion of 6 units of the proposed program.

5. A minimum TOEFL score of at least 550 on the paper-based exam; 213 on the computer-based TOEFL; 80 on the internet-based test; or a band score of 6.5 on the IELTS.

6. Course prerequisites.

Prerequisites for Admission to Classified Status:

1. In place of the third requirement above: an undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 in the last 60 units. Students admitted to classified status must also file an approved, preliminary program plan with the Graduate Coordinator.

2. All other conditions listed under Admission to Conditionally Classified Status.

Advancement to Candidacy:

In addition to any requirements listed above:

1. Classified graduate standing.

2. Completion of 9 units of the proposed program at the University.

3. An approved master's degree program plan developed in consultation with the graduate advisory committee and the Graduate Coordinator.

4. Request for advancement to candidacy.

Requirements for the MA in Teaching International Languages:

Completion of all requirements established by the program's Advisory Board, the student's graduate advisory committee, and the Office of Graduate Studies, to include:

1. Completion of an approved program consisting of 36 units of 400/500/600-level courses.

(a) The common core of course work (12 units), language studies (12 units), cultural studies (6 units), research (3 units), and master's study (3 units).

(b) At least 60 percent of the units required for the degree in 600-level courses.

(c) Not more than 9 semester units of transfer and/or extension credit (correspondence courses and UC extension course work are not acceptable).

(d) Not more than 15 units taken before admission to classified status.

(e) Not more than a total of 10 units of Independent Study (697) and Master's Thesis (699T) or Master's Project (699P; not more than 6 units of Master's Thesis (699T) or Master's Project (699P).

(f) Completion of required course work and approved electives.

2. Core requirements:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ENGL 371.
Introduction to major issues in second language acquisition and teaching. 3 hours seminar. (003540)
Survey of innovative approaches to foreign/second language teaching. An overview of theory and practice in the field, highlighting methods for the development of comprehension and communication skills. Humanistic techniques, teaching the cultural context of language use, and language testing are also included. 3 hours seminar. (002891)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Possess a single or multiple subjects credential, or faculty permission.
A study of strategies and methodologies used for teaching in a classroom setting structured to meet the needs of English language learners, including specifically designed academic instruction delivered in English. Bilingual/Crosscultural models will be analyzed. The models provided will allow for implementation in varied teaching situations. 3 hours seminar. (001412)
Assessment, diagnosis, and evaluation of foreign/second language skills and proficiency. Emphasis on formal and informal assessment techniques. Course is intended primarily for Language Development and Bilingual Specialists, foreign language and ESL teachers. 3 hours seminar. (002889)
Articulation of curriculum theory and practice in foreign languages and English as a second language. Focus on examination of instructional programs, techniques, and materials as well as classroom organization. 3 hours seminar. (002890)

In addition to the practicum experiences required in ENGL 470 and EDSL 610, students entering the program without teaching experience must demonstrate experience prior to graduation through one or more of several options: a professional field experience (EDCI 689); internship courses offered by different departments (e.g., SPAN 689); teaching experience as an instructor with the American Language and Culture Institute on campus; as an instructor in other University programs (e.g., English or Foreign Languages and Literatures) or at the community college level (e.g., Butte College, Shasta College, Yuba College); teaching experience overseas; or by other appropriate means.

3. The language studies component consists of 12 units of electives within one of two patterns. Pattern A is a TESOL: English as a Second Language to adult learners/English as a Foreign Language emphasis and Pattern B is a Foreign Language emphasis. In consultation with a graduate advisor, students will choose an area of emphasis consistent with the target language they teach.

Pattern A

For the TESOL: English as a Second Language for adolescent and adult learners/English as a Foreign Language Emphasis, students choose from the following courses:

12 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ENGL 333 and ENGL 335 are strongly recommended.
Training and experience in the tutoring of students in composition. With permission of instructor, course may be repeated once for credit, but credit will not count toward major. 3 hours seminar, 3 hours laboratory. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units. (003539)
Prerequisites: ENGL 371, ENGL 375.
Study of syntax and morphology, focusing on similarities and differences among languages from the viewpoint of both form and function. 3 hours seminar. (003531)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, ENGL 371.
Study of world's sound systems as well as the relevant phonetics and morphology with an emphasis on English and second language acquisition. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (003533)
A comprehensive exploration of semantics, including theories of meaning, relationship between semantics and conceptual structure, semantics and cognition in language acquisition, and the relationship between meaning and use. 3 hours lecture. (003534)
Prerequisites: ENGL 371 or ENGL 471.
An examination of recent psycholinguistic theory and research in the field of reading as a language process, with practical experience in reading instruction. 3 hours seminar. (003535)
Theories of distributed and situated cognition and learning as applied to literacy development and education. The course materials come from a variety of disciplines, including psycholinguistics, anthropology, cognitive science, sociology, education, and literacy theory. 3 hours lecture. (020258)
Intensive study of contemporary literacy theory and practice; the cultural and individual bases of the development of literacy. 3 hours seminar. (003657)
Weekly seminar in the theory and practice of teaching composition. Required of all prospective teaching associates. 3 hours seminar. (003660)
Prerequisites: ENGL 431 or ENGL 470 for ESL; faculty permission.
Supervised classroom experience in teaching ESL, literature, and creative writing. Students must be in MA program in English and have permission of program coordinator and instructor of record. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (015976)
Current issues in the study of literature, critical theory, composition, and linguistics. Specific topics vary from semester to semester. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (003663)

Note: ENGL 375, a foundation course, is strongly recommended for all students in Pattern A.

Pattern B

For the Foreign Language Emphasis, students select 12 units of 400/500/600-level course work in linguistics, language, literature and/or culture taught in the target language. Selections should consist primarily of courses taught in the target language (e.g., French, German, Italian, Japanese, Spanish). Candidates are expected to hold an appropriate degree or credential, or to possess comparable proficiency in the target language as assessed by the Foreign Languages and Literatures Department. Candidates may also select from English Department offerings in linguistics, as appropriate.

4. The cultural studies component consists of 6 units of 400/500/600-level courses selected from the humanities and social sciences, from education and marketing, and from offerings in international studies. In consultation with a graduate advisor, students will choose course work consistent with the target language and culture they teach. Examples of possible choices for students in both patterns include:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course provides language professionals with an opportunity to examine the cultural dimensions of language teaching and learning. Students investigate context and culture in language teaching, explore ways of addressing culture-related standards, and engage in an in-depth review of research in this area. They also apply their knowledge and skills to enhance interaction and instruction in language classrooms for all learners. 3 hours lecture. (020007)

Note: EDSL 633 is required for Pattern A and the Graduate TESOL Certificate.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A critical examination of selected theories and methods in cultural anthropology, and/or the generation of new theories and methods pertinent to selected problems in cultural anthropology. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (000657)
Examination of ways in which socio-cultural factors influence teaching/learning process for students in all classrooms. Emphasis on approaches and strategies for integrating cross-cultural concepts into content areas, evaluating instructional materials, and developing curriculum. 3 hours seminar. (001411)
This seminar is intended to introduce students to some central topics of intercultural communication from diverse theoretical perspectives. Various intellectual, historical and political contexts in which intercultural communication occurs are examined. The seminar also addresses discussions about the relationship between self and other, identities and differences, nationalism (or nation-state), immigration, citizenship, and globalization with an explicit focus on communication in intercultural communication contexts. 3 hours seminar. (002260)
Specially designed and supervised field experience activities through coaching or mentoring, appropriate to the level of expertise and profession. Participants enhance competencies related to instruction, curriculum, assessment, and management. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (002815)

Note: EDCI 689 is required for the Graduate TESOL Certificate.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An introduction to French cinema as a narrative form, with emphasis on key films and directors from various periods of French film history. The class is taught in English. All films have English subtitles. 3 hours discussion. (003813)
Class taught in English. All films have English subtitles. Historical survey of representative films from the post-war era, the New German, and feminist cinema, including study of their cultural and social significance, with a component of significant film aesthetics and theories from Kluge to contemporary feminist film theories. 3 hours discussion. (004224)
Significant ideas in American history, 1607 to the present; the influence of Puritanism, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, and modern science upon American character and society. 3 hours seminar. (000413)
This course is also offered as MEST 463 .
Islamic civilization 600-1800; religion, philosophy, law, education, literature, and political thought and activity. 3 hours seminar. (004649)
Intensive reading in selected periods of European history. Written and oral presentations of reading and research required. 3 hours seminar. (004739)
May be taken for 1 to 9 units. 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (004892)
The Italian Cinema as a creative art form has had a profound and lasting impact on world cinematography. The course will include Italian film history and the study of major trends and techniques. The relationship of the cinema to socio-political, economic, and literary events in Italy and the world will be studied: Neorealism, The Felliniesque, Spaghetti Western, Commedia all'Italiana, and more recent trends. The class is taught in English and all films have English subtitles. 3 hours discussion. (005111)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, LAST 110.
An in-depth, interdisciplinary seminar that examines selected topics in Latin American culture and society, past and present, through critical reading of, and commentary on, recent scholarship devoted to the region. Readings may include Spanish language sources. Topics vary by semester. Required for majors and minors. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (005384)
This course is also offered as HIST 463 .
Islamic civilization 600-1800; religion, philosophy, law, education, literature, and political thought and activity. 3 hours seminar. (004649)
Prerequisites: MKTG 371.
A study of all aspects of marketing unique to international business. Examines the impact of cultures, ethics, history, politics, and social customs on marketing thinking and practices worldwide. 3 hours discussion. (005879)
Intensive reading and research on a topic related to this sub-field of political science. Written and oral presentation of research usually required. 3 hours seminar. (015551)
Prerequisites: SPAN 301; SPAN 341 or SPAN 342; or faculty permission.
Students will consider the elements that constitute literary and cinematic masterpieces by examining films based on a variety of texts: epic poetry, drama, short story, legend, novel, zarzuela, and filmscript. The films will represent the cultural and linguistic diversity in areas of Spain and Latin America. 3 hours discussion. (009183)

5. The research and master's study component consists of a foreign/second language research course and 3 units of master's study or comprehensive examination. Other graduate research courses consistent with special student interests may be substituted with approval. The culminating activity will consist of a thesis, project, or comprehensive examination.

Research Course

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Theories of language acquisition and applications of research. This course focuses on linguistic, psychological, sociocultural, historical, and legal bases of foreign language and English as a second language. 3 hours seminar. (002888)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

Other approved research methods course.

Culminating Activity

Students enroll in Master's Project or Master's Thesis units from the home department of their graduate advisory committee chair (e.g., EDMA 699P or EDMA 699T, ENGL 699P or ENGL 699T, SPAN 699P or SPAN 699T). Any 699 course normally must be taken for 3 units.

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Preparation for comprehensive examination in Teaching International Languages. 9 hours supervision. Credit/no credit grading. (015874)

Select EDSL 696 if the culminating activity is a comprehensive examination. EDSL 696 normally must be taken for 3 units.

(a) Thesis or Project Plan. Requires completion and final approval of a thesis or project for 3 units (699T or 699P), plus at least 33 units of approved course work.

A proposal for the thesis or project must be submitted to and approved by the graduate advisory committee before the student may enroll in the thesis or project units. When human subjects approval is required, clearance must be secured before the proposal is filed.

An oral defense shall be conducted by the candidate's graduate advisory committee.

Approval by the graduate advisory committee, the Graduate Coordinator, and the Office of Graduate Studies is required.

(b) Comprehensive Examination Plan. Requires completion of 3 units of Comprehensive Examination (EDSL 696) in preparation for a nine-hour written comprehensive examination, with oral review, covering each of the program areas, plus at least 33 units of approved course work.

The graduate advisory committee will prepare, administer, and evaluate the comprehensive examination.

Each examination shall be graded as honors, pass, or fail.

All parts of the comprehensive examination must receive a grade of pass. The candidate may repeat each part of the examination once.

Graduate Requirement in Writing Proficiency:

Writing proficiency is a graduation requirement.

Students in the program will demonstrate their writing proficiency by submitting an acceptable Justification Statement with the application to the program. Consult the Graduate Coordinator for further information.

Graduate Grading Requirements:

All courses in the major (with the exceptions of Independent Study - 697, Comprehensive Examination - 696, Master's Project - 699P, and Master's Thesis - 699T) must be taken for a letter grade, except those courses specified by the department as ABC/No Credit (400/500-level courses), AB/No Credit (600-level courses), or Credit/No Credit grading only. A maximum of 10 units combined of ABC/No Credit, AB/No Credit, and Credit/No Credit grades may be used on the approved program (including 697, 696, 699P, 699T and courses outside the major). While grading standards are determined by individual programs and instructors, it is also the policy of the University that unsatisfactory grades may be given when work fails to reflect achievement of the high standards, including high writing standards, expected of students pursuing graduate study.

Students must maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average in each of the following three categories: all course work taken at any accredited institution subsequent to admission to the master's program; all course work taken at CSU, Chico subsequent to admission to the program; and all courses on the approved master's degree program.

Graduate Advising Requirement:

Once the master's degree program plan has been developed and approved, advising is recommended but not mandatory each semester. For further information, consult the Graduate Coordinator.

Catalog Cycle:12