Skip to Side Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Accessibility Settings

The Master of Science in Environmental Science

Course Requirements for the Master's Degree: 30-36 units

Continuous enrollment is required. A maximum of 9 semester units of transfer and/or CSU Chico Open University coursework may be applied toward the degree.

Graduate Time Limit:

All requirements for the degree are to be completed within five years of the end of the semester of enrollment in the oldest course applied toward the degree. See Master's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements.

The MS degree and PSM option in Environmental Science are available for advanced study in biological, chemical, geoscience, physical, or engineering aspects of environmental science. Prospective students should discuss their interests and goals with the appropriate program Graduate Coordinator.

Prerequisites for Admission to Conditionally Classified Status:

1. Satisfactory grade point average as specified in Graduate and Postbaccalaureate Admission Requirements in the University Catalog.

2. Approval by the department and the Office of Graduate Studies.

3. An acceptable baccalaureate in one of the natural sciences, engineering, mathematics, or allied field from a regionally accredited institution, or an equivalent approved by the Office of Graduate Studies. The prospective student must have sufficient background to undertake a graduate program in Environmental Science: one year of mathematics (either one semester of statistics and one semester of calculus or one year of calculus), two semesters of college physics, two semesters of chemistry, and a semester of ecology.

4. Two letters of recommendation are required for the PSM option.

5. A one-page "Statement of Purpose"

6. Applicants for the PSM option may be interviewed before selection. Students from varied academic backgrounds are encouraged to apply. It is strongly recommended that applicants have at least one year of professional experience in some discipline of science. Dedicated non-scientists will be required to take adequate remedial coursework before admittance into the program.

Prerequisites for Admission to Classified Status:

In addition to any requirements listed above:

1. Completion of the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test with a minimum combined score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative portions.

2. Formation of a graduate advisory committee.

3. Development of an approved program in consultation with the graduate advisory committee.

Advancement to Candidacy:

In addition to any requirements listed above:

Students must have classified graduate standing and must have completed at least 9 units of the proposed program at the University.

Requirements for the MS in Environmental Science: 30 units

Completion of all requirements as established by the graduate advisory committee, and the Office of Graduate Studies, to include:

1. Completion of an approved program consisting of 30 units of 400/500/600-level courses as follows:

(a) A core of 12-15 units in required courses to include GEOS 600, GEOS 601, GEOS 640, GEOS 660, a 400/500/600-level course in biological science or chemistry and GEOS 630 or GEOS 650. Substitutions for required courses must be taken at Chico and must be approved by the Graduate Coordinator.

(b) 9-17 units of course work selected from areas such as mathematics, plant science, chemistry, geosciences, geography, political science, engineering, or biological sciences. Selection must be approved by the graduate advisory committee and the Graduate Coordinator. Substitutions for required courses must be taken at Chico and must be approved by the Graduate Coordinator.

(c) 1-6 units of BIOL 699T or GEOS 699T. At least one unit of Master's Thesis (699) is required.

(d) At least 18 of the units required for the degree in 600-level courses.

(e) Not more than 9 semester units of transfer and/or extension or Open University credit (correspondence courses and U.C. extension course work are not acceptable).

(f) Not more than 15 units taken before admission to classified status.

(g) At least 9 units completed after advancement to candidacy.

(h) Not more than 10 units of Independent Study (697) and Master's Thesis (699T); at least 1, but not more than 6, units of Master's Thesis (699T).

2. Completion and final approval of a thesis as specified by the student's graduate advisory committee.

3. Satisfactory completion of a comprehensive final examination (written and/or oral) in the field of study.

4. Approval by the graduate advisory committee and the Graduate Council on behalf of the faculty of the University.

Course Requirements for the MS in Environmental Science:

8 units required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Presentation and discussion of reports on current literature and special studies in geosciences. 1 hour seminar. (004177)
Presentation and discussion of reports on current literature and special studies in geosciences. 1 hour seminar. (004178)
Prerequisites: CHEM 111, CHEM 112. Recommended: GEOS 565.
Origins and sources of chemical constituents of natural waters, including water-rock interactions, equilibrium aqueous speciation, reaction-path modeling, oxidation-reduction reactions, mineral solubility relations, geochemical transport, reaction kinetics, and aqueous isotopic systems. 3 hours seminar. (004186)
Prerequisites: MATH 120.
Survey and implementation of common numerical techniques in use in geoscientific data analysis, including multivariate data analysis, geostatistics, finite difference and finite element analyses, time-series analysis, and fractal geometry. 3 hours lecture. (004188)

2-4 units selected from:

One 400/500/600-level course in Biological Sciences or Chemistry.

2-3 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
Geological and geophysical characteristics of the geomorphic provinces of California. Formation of surficial features, such as mountain ranges, drainage networks, and valleys as a response to active tectonic processes. Detailed geologic and physiographic framework of Northern California as a setting for field-based studies in the geosciences. 3 hours lecture. (004185)
Survey of environmental monitoring for air quality, water quality, pollution, waste disposal, environmental resources, etc., including field and laboratory observations and exercises. An individual term project in environmental monitoring is required and may involve collection of field data, interpretation of field data, development of analytical capabilities, or other subjects pertinent to the student's research interests. 1 hour discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (004187)

1-6 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is a master's study offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (001320)
This course is a master's thesis offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (004194)

At least 1 unit of 699T is required.

Select 9-17 units from courses approved by the graduate advisory committee.

Requirements for the MS in Environmental Science: Professional Science Master's Option: 36 units

Completion of all requirements as established by the graduate advisory committee and the Office of Graduate Studies to include the following.

1. Completion of an approved program consisting of 36 units of 400/500/600-level course work as follows:

(a) The following core of 24 units. Substitutions for required courses must be approved by the PSM Graduate Coordinator.

7 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Presentation and discussion of reports on current literature and special studies in geosciences. 1 hour seminar. (004177)
Presentation and discussion of reports on current literature and special studies in geosciences. 1 hour seminar. (004178)
Survey of environmental monitoring for air quality, water quality, pollution, waste disposal, environmental resources, etc., including field and laboratory observations and exercises. An individual term project in environmental monitoring is required and may involve collection of field data, interpretation of field data, development of analytical capabilities, or other subjects pertinent to the student's research interests. 1 hour discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (004187)
Prerequisites: CHEM 270 or CHEM 320, MATH 120, PHYS 202B. Recommended: BIOL 350 or BIOL 360.
The scientific basis of risk assessment in various sectors of human activity, with particular emphasis on business, industrial, governmental agency, and planning concerns. 3 hours lecture. (020467)
Prerequisites: Completion of three semesters of coursework in either the Environmental Sciences MS program or the proposed PSM option of the Environmental Sciences MS program.
Overview of environmental science issues, including biological, chemical, and engineering examples. Particular focus is on future issues and approaches. Social and ethical issues are also examined. 3 hours lecture. (020465)
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
This course is a master's project offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (020469)

Note: GEOS 699P must be taken for at least 2 units.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: MGMT 303 or faculty permission.
Creating team effectiveness and developing project management skills. Includes coverage of the nine project management body of knowledge areas required for professional certification by PMI, the professional code of ethics, and the benefits of diversity on team performance. The course requires use of information technology including spreadsheets, Web-based file storage and sharing, electronic presentations and use of project management software. 3 hours lecture. (005731)

2 courses selected with advising approval from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ACCT 202.
The study of organizational uses of accounting information to implement strategies and control operations. Readings and cases emphasize the role and uses of accounting information in the new manufacturing environment, in total quality management, and in international operations. 3 hours seminar. (000120)
Prerequisites: Classified MBA student.
An examination of software products available to assist managers during decision-making. Application of several programs in the areas of statistical analysis, management science, database management systems, spreadsheets, and expert systems to business situations. Case studies requiring computer solution, professional report-writing, and conference-style presentations. 3 hours seminar. (001081)
Examination of a variety of issues in corporate communication, including ethical, organizational, and cross-cultural consequences of message choices. Focus on those decisions made by managers that are conveyed and implemented using written documents, oral presentations, dyadic conversations, and group meetings. 3 hours seminar. (005748)
Prerequisite: Classified MBA student.
Study of current theory and research in organizational behavior and organizational design, emphasizing managerial applications. Includes ethical, environmental, technological, and international considerations. 3 hours seminar. (005743)
Prerequisites: Classified MBA student.
A study of marketing concepts and strategies, such as demand analysis, product/market positioning, distribution, promotion, and pricing strategies. Emphasis on integrating such concepts and strategies into strategic marketing programs. 3 hours seminar. (015959)
Prerequisites: POLS 602; POLS 662 is recommended.
This course will review, analyze, and test strategies of public management. Emphasis will be on areas of decision-making, planning, development, budgeting, and collective bargaining. Purpose is to familiarize students with the various approaches to public sector problem-solving and decision-making, primarily by using the case study format. 3 hours seminar. (007698)
Prerequisites: POLS 602.
A survey of the processes of recruiting and managing personnel in the public service. The philosophy of public personnel administration, organization for personnel administration, history, and evolution of the career system, comparative modern structures, and general processes of personnel. Both traditional and behavioral literature. 3 hours seminar. (007699)
Prerequisites: POLS 602; POLS 631 is recommended.
Survey of budgeting problems, issues, and applications of theories, research, and approaches toward use of cost-benefit analysis in the public sector. Activities are focused on surveying the literature and researching public programs using Program Planning and Budgeting Systems and cost-benefit analysis. 3 hours seminar. (007700)
Prerequisites: POLS 600 and POLS 631 or equivalents are highly recommended.
This course applies specific techniques for evaluating both program operations and the outcome of program activities. It applies the research methodologies and techniques employed for policy and program assessment including use of social indicators, quantitative and qualitative methods, and quasi-experimental designs used in applied policy and program research. Finally, students learn about writing grant proposals and managing contracts. 3 hours seminar. (007709)
This course provides overview of the operations management process. The operations management field includes the primary functions of business. These central functions of an organization are responsible for the creation and delivery of goods and services. This course will assist the student in developing both quantitative and qualitative skills to utilize current methodologies, systems, and technology to plan, execute, implement, and analyze performance of the organization and its resources. The topic area of quality management will be a significant segment of this course. 3 hours seminar. (007747)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: MATH 120.
Survey and implementation of common numerical techniques in use in geoscientific data analysis, including multivariate data analysis, geostatistics, finite difference and finite element analyses, time-series analysis, and fractal geometry. 3 hours lecture. (004188)
Prerequisites: MATH 105, MATH 350, MATH 315, or MATH 305 (only one is required).
Introduction to common procedures used to analyze data. Single and two-sample inference, analysis of variance, multiple regression, analysis of co-variance, experimental design, repeated measures, nonparametric procedures, and categorical data analysis. Examples will be drawn from Biology and related disciplines. Statistical computer packages will be introduced. Appropriate for biology, agriculture, nutrition, psychology, social science, and other majors. 3 hours discussion. (005597)

(b) 12 units selected from one of the following advising patterns:

Environmental Biotechnology Advising Pattern

12 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: BIOL 409 or CHEM 451.
Theory and strategies used in procaryotic and eucaryotic molecular biology. DNA manipulations, cloning systems, immunological assays, and protein purification and analytical techniques. 3 hours seminar, 3 hours laboratory. (001279)
Prerequisites: BIOL 609.
This course is a special topic offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Detailed discussion of selected topics in molecular and cellular biology. Extensive survey of current literature and analysis of research strategies. Topics are selected and advertised by instructor. Past topics have included molecular actions between plants and microbes; pathogenesis of disease; oncogenes and signal transduction. 1 hour discussion. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (001281)
Prerequisites: BIOL 411 or BIOL 414 or BIOL 416.
Examination of the underlying molecular and bio-chemical mechanisms which allow physiological adaptations, establishment of pattern formation and differentiation of eucaryotic organisms. 3 hours seminar, 3 hours laboratory. (001280)
Prerequisites: BIOL 611.
This course is a special topic offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Detailed discussion of selected contemporary topics in physiological and developmental biology. Topic will be selected and advertised by the instructor. 1 hour discussion. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (001285)
Prerequisites: BIOL 409.
A consideration of the processes involved in plant growth and the development of form, with emphasis on higher plants and recent experimental approaches. 2 hours seminar, 6 hours laboratory. (001278)
Prerequisites: CHEM 112.
A general study of the chemistry of the geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere; special focus on the sources and fates of inorganic environmental pollutants. 3 hours discussion. (001881)
Prerequisites: CHEM 108 or CHEM 270.
A brief introduction to the principles of toxicology and presentation of facts about current issues related to toxic substances, with special expanded emphasis on environmental aspects of topics presented in CHEM 345. 2 hours discussion. (001880)
You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Discussions and library research into selected topics; may include some lab work. Different topics presented each semester. May be repeated for credit, with permission of instructor. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (004184)

Natural Resource Management Advising Pattern

12 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: BIOL 350.
Study and lecture/discussion of population ecology, with an emphasis on field methods used on local populations. 2 hours seminar, 6 hours laboratory. (001303)
Prerequisites: BIOL 350 or GEOG 444; MATH 314 or MATH 350 or GEOG 315.
This course is also offered as GEOG 660 .
This course emphasizes spatial patterning in the landscapeits causes, development, and importance for ecological and environmental processes. The course includes the study of ecological and anthropologic aspects of landscape pattern and change. The laboratory includes hands-on experience with tools used in landscape ecology. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (020295)
Prerequisites: BIOL 350 and a statistics course.
The analysis, modeling, and computer simulation of the structure and function of communities and ecosystems, with emphasis on patterns of competition, predation, energy and nutrient flow and succession. 2 hours seminar, 3 hours laboratory. (001305)
Prerequisites: CHEM 112.
A general study of the chemistry of the geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere; special focus on the sources and fates of inorganic environmental pollutants. 3 hours discussion. (001881)
Prerequisites: CHEM 108 or CHEM 270.
A brief introduction to the principles of toxicology and presentation of facts about current issues related to toxic substances, with special expanded emphasis on environmental aspects of topics presented in CHEM 345. 2 hours discussion. (001880)
Prerequisites: At least one of the following: AGRI 331, BIOL 414, BIOL 450, GEOG 343, GEOG 405, GEOG 444, GEOG 450, PSSC 330, PSSC 334, PSSC 433, PSSC 438, or faculty permission.
Pyrogeography is a comprehensive study of the physical and cultural parameters of fire. Topics covered include the spacial and temporal relationships of fire as an integral landscape process with an emphasis on the maintenance of North American ecosystems; the interpretation of the cultural uses of fire by indigenous communities as well as the historic and contemporary implications of fire management and policies; and the ecological implications of fire on biotic and abiotic systems. 3 hours discussion. (020415)
Prerequisites: BIOL 334, GEOG 427, and faculty permission.
Survey of environmental planning processes using concepts and principles of conservation ecology. Coverage includes legal mandates, administrative procedures, implementation techniques, and monitoring outcomes. Emphasis is on case studies and hands-on experience. 3 hours seminar. (004016)
Prerequisites: BIOL 350 or GEOG 444; MATH 314 or MATH 350 or GEOG 315.
This course is also offered as BIOL 660 .
This course emphasizes spatial patterning in the landscapeits causes, development, and importance for ecological and environmental processes. The course includes the study of ecological and anthropologic aspects of landscape pattern and change. The laboratory includes hands-on experience with tools used in landscape ecology. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (020295)
Prerequisites: CHEM 111, GEOS 315.
Fundamentals of processes in environmental aquatic systems emphasizing acid-base and pE-pH relationships, solubility of carbon species in natural waters, and interactions at the solid-liquid interface. 3 hours lecture. (020287)
Prerequisites: CHEM 112, GEOS 315.
Principles of transport of atmospheric constituents. Kinetics, mechanisms and photochemistry in the troposphere and stratosphere. A survey of atmospheric aerosols. 3 hours lecture. (020285)
Prerequisites: CHEM 112; GEOS 330 or faculty permission; MATH 120; either PHYS 202B or PHYS 204C.
Physical principles, theory and analysis techniques for computer modeling in the geosciences. Methods of estimation and error analysis, boundary values and initial conditions, steady-state and time-dependent models. Emphasis on problems relating to air and water pollution and hydrologic cycle. 3 hours discussion. (004163)
Prerequisites: Chem 112, GEOS 315.
The application of biological, ecological, chemical, and physical sciences to understanding the fate and transport of pollutants through ecosystems. 3 hours discussion. (004165)
Prerequisites: BIOL 350.
Examination of the mechanisms, directions, and magnitude of an organism's or ecosystem's response to human perturbation. 3 hours discussion. (004166)
Prerequisites: BIOL 350, GEOS 270 or GEOS 380, or instructor consent.
The study of linkages between hydrologic processes and ecosystem functions; field methods for data gathering; hydrologic transport of nutrients and pollutants through ecosystems; case studies of problems in ecohydrology. 3 hours lecture. (020330)
You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Discussions and library research into selected topics; may include some lab work. Different topics presented each semester. May be repeated for credit, with permission of instructor. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (004184)

Sustainable Development and Technology Advising Pattern

12 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: BIOL 609.
This course is a special topic offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Detailed discussion of selected topics in molecular and cellular biology. Extensive survey of current literature and analysis of research strategies. Topics are selected and advertised by instructor. Past topics have included molecular actions between plants and microbes; pathogenesis of disease; oncogenes and signal transduction. 1 hour discussion. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (001281)
Prerequisites: CHEM 112.
A general study of the chemistry of the geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere; special focus on the sources and fates of inorganic environmental pollutants. 3 hours discussion. (001881)
Prerequisites: CHEM 108 or CHEM 270.
A brief introduction to the principles of toxicology and presentation of facts about current issues related to toxic substances, with special expanded emphasis on environmental aspects of topics presented in CHEM 345. 2 hours discussion. (001880)
Prerequisites: BIOL 151 or NSCI 102; CHEM 107 or CHEM 111; MATH 109 or MATH 120; junior standing.
Introduction to water quality, water supply, distribution, and drinking water treatment; wastewater collection, treatment, and disposal. Disease transmission; water quality parameters; physical, chemical, and biological processes in the treatment of water, wastewater, and biosolids. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (001529)
Prerequisites: CIVL 431 or faculty permission.
Natural systems for the treatment of wastewater; transmission of excreta-related infections; treatment systems for removal of pathogens; wastewater and biosolids reuse in agriculture and aquaculture. Special emphasis on the problems of developing countries. 3 hours discussion. (001533)
Prerequisites: CIVL 431 or faculty permission.
An introduction to the handling and management of solid and hazardous wastes. Emphasis on state-of-the-art engineering techniques and contemporary management issues based on social, economic, and legal considerations; risk assessment; case studies. Special emphasis on problems of developing countries. 3 hours discussion. (001536)
Prerequisites: CHEM 112; GEOS 330 or faculty permission; MATH 120; either PHYS 202B or PHYS 204C.
Physical principles, theory and analysis techniques for computer modeling in the geosciences. Methods of estimation and error analysis, boundary values and initial conditions, steady-state and time-dependent models. Emphasis on problems relating to air and water pollution and hydrologic cycle. 3 hours discussion. (004163)
Prerequisites: Chem 112, GEOS 315.
The application of biological, ecological, chemical, and physical sciences to understanding the fate and transport of pollutants through ecosystems. 3 hours discussion. (004165)
Prerequisites: GEOS 102, GEOS 203, GEOS 306. For majors in related sciences and technical fields, GEOS 102 only.
Practical application of techniques to solve geological engineering and environmental problems. Techniques of surface investigations and remote sensing; borehole and surface geophysics; soil descriptions and properties; landslide mapping, mechanics and remediation, subsurface investigation of rock masses; mapping of discontinuities, establishing rock quality, tunneling techniques. Seismic studies; surface and trench mapping of faults, seismic risk analysis. Ground water monitoring, site assessment, techniques of hazardous waste cleanup, state and federal regulations on hazardous waste, siting of landfills. 3 hours lecture. (004116)
You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Discussions and library research into selected topics; may include some lab work. Different topics presented each semester. May be repeated for credit, with permission of instructor. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (004184)
Prerequisites: CHEM 111, CHEM 112. Recommended: GEOS 565.
Origins and sources of chemical constituents of natural waters, including water-rock interactions, equilibrium aqueous speciation, reaction-path modeling, oxidation-reduction reactions, mineral solubility relations, geochemical transport, reaction kinetics, and aqueous isotopic systems. 3 hours seminar. (004186)
Prerequisites: EECE 211, MATH 260. Recommended: MECA 380, MECH 320; either CSCI 111 or MECH 208.
Modeling and simulation of dynamic system performance. Control system design for continuous systems using both analog and digital control techniques. 3 hours lecture. (005407)
Prerequisites: EECE 211L, MECH 340; EECE 482 or MECA 482 (may be taken concurrently).
Machine automation concepts in electrical circuits, precision mechanics, control systems, and programming. Motor sizing, gearing, couplings, ground loops, effective use of step motors, servo control loops, regeneration, networking, I/O, power supplies, vibration and resonance, mechanical tolerancing, linear bearings and drive mechanisms, and troubleshooting. Labs simulate application concepts such as point-to-point coordinated moves, registration, following, camming, and CAD-to-Motion by combining various motor technologies with various mechanical drive types. 2 hours lecture, 4 hours activity. (005655)
Prerequisites: MECH 338.
Thermodynamics of power cycles, refrigeration, air-conditioning, and combustion processes; analysis, design, and testing of systems involving both conventional and renewable energy sources for power generation, heating, and cooling applications. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (005442)
Prerequisites: CIVL 321 (or faculty permission), CHEM 111; either CHEM 331 or MECH 332. Recommended: CIVL 302, MECH 306.
Analysis and design of components and systems for gaseous and particulate pollution control; gas separation by absorption, adsorption, condensation, and incineration; particulate separation by gravity settlers, cyclones, electrostatic precipitators, fabric filters, and scrubbers; air pollution legislation and regulation. 3 hours discussion. (005443)

(d) At least 60 percent of the units required for the degree must be in 600-level courses.

(e) Not more than a total of 10 units of Independent Study (597/697) and Master's Project (699P); at least 2, but no more than 6, units of Master's Project (699P).

2. Completion and final approval of a professional internship and project as specified by the student's graduate advisory committee.

3. Approval by the graduate advisory committee and the Graduate Council on behalf of the faculty of the University.

Graduate Requirement in Writing Proficiency:

Writing proficiency is a graduation requirement.

Environmental Science students will normally demonstrate their writing proficiency through successful completion of GEOS 600 and GEOS 601, Geosciences Seminar, or an approved substitute.

Graduate Grading Requirements:

All courses in the major (with the exceptions of Independent Study - 697, Comprehensive Examination - 696, Master's Project - 699P, and Master's Thesis - 699T) must be taken for a letter grade, except those courses specified by the department as ABC/No Credit (400/500-level courses), AB/No Credit (600-level courses), or Credit/No Credit grading only. A maximum of 10 units combined of ABC/No Credit, AB/No Credit, and Credit/No Credit grades may be used on the approved program (including 697, 696, 699P, 699T and courses outside the major). While grading standards are determined by individual programs and instructors, it is also the policy of the University that unsatisfactory grades may be given when work fails to reflect achievement of the high standards, including high writing standards, expected of students pursuing graduate study.

Students must maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average in each of the following three categories: all course work taken at any accredited institution subsequent to admission to the master's program; all course work taken at CSU, Chico subsequent to admission to the program; and all courses on the approved master's degree program.

Graduate Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for new and readmitted students in the master's program in Environmental Science. Consult the Graduate Coordinator for specifics.

Catalog Cycle:12