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The Bachelor of Science in Health Science

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Degree MAPs page in the University Catalog or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Literacy Requirement:

See Mathematics and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog. Writing proficiency in the major is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of a course in your major which has been designated as the Writing Proficiency (WP) course for the semester in which you take the course. Students who earn below a C- are required to repeat the course and earn a C- or higher to receive WP credit. See the Class Schedule for the designated WP courses for each semester. You must pass ENGL 130I or JOUR 130I (or equivalent) with a C- or higher before you may register for a WP course.

Course Requirements for the Major: 63-69 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree. Additional required courses, depending upon the selected option or advising pattern, are outlined following the major core program requirements.

Note: A maximum of 15 units of internship (courses numbered 189, 289, 389, 489) may be applied to a bachelor's degree at CSU, Chico.

Major Core Program: 18 units

6 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Analyzes fundamental principles upon which school, community, and population health are based. The contributions of federal, state, and local organizations to national goals for health promotion and disease prevention are examined. Explores fundamental social, political, organizational, and behavioral aspects of public health in school, community, and worksite settings. 3 hours lecture. (001575)
This course is also offered as MCGS 328 .
Ethnic groups in the U.S. face many health problems. This course focuses on those problems which affect the four largest ethnic groups in the U.S.: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, and Asian Americans. The effects of history, health beliefs and practices, and socioeconomic status on the health of these ethnic populations are addressed. Current and potential strategies to improve health care delivery to these groups are explored. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved US Diversity course. (004448)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, MATH 105.
The course introduces students to research methodology and program evaluation techniques in the health field. Students develop skills for critically reading professional literature and writing a research or program evaluation proposal. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (001614)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in HCSV 490, senior standing, minimum 2.0 GPA in the major at CSU, Chico, faculty permission.
Field practicum designed to integrate theory and practice in a community setting. Supervised by an agency representative and faculty member. Minimum internship requirement for Health Science majors is 5.0 units. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (004467)

Note: A minimum of 5 units of HCSV 489 is required for all options.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in HCSV 489.
Integration of previous learning with realities of professional practice in the internship placement. 1 hour seminar. Credit/no credit grading. (001620)
Prerequisites: Completion of ELM requirement.
Summary of numerical data, elementary probability, distributions, and introduction to statistical inference. A grade of C- or higher is required for GE credit. 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (005501)

Major Option Course Requirements: 45-51 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required dependent upon the option chosen. Students must select one of the following options for completion of the major course requirements.

The Option in Environmental Health: 49-51 units

Math and Science Core: 31-32 units

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Recommend CHEM 111 or concurrent enrollment.
Introduction to biological molecules, bioenergetics, cellular structure and function, elements of molecular biology and genetics, and mechanisms of macroevolution and systematics. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001122)
Prerequisites: High school physics or faculty permission. High school trigonometry and second-year high school algebra or equivalent (MATH 051 and MATH 118 at CSU, Chico).
Mechanics, properties of matter, wave motion, sound, heat. Science majors are encouraged to take PHYS 204A instead of this course. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (007394)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: BIOL 103, BIOL 104, BIOL 151, or NSCI 102; CHEM 107, CHEM 108, or CHEM 111.
Introduction to structure/function, metabolism, genetics, ecological interactions and pathogenic mechanisms of microorganisms. In addition, the roles of microorganisms in sanitation and in the food and biotechnology industries will be discussed. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001132)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; BIOL 151, BIOL 152, BIOL 153, or faculty permission.
Introduction to the biology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms, as well as viruses. Topics include cell structure, metabolism, genetics; ecological interactions; pathogenic mechanisms; and the roles of microorganisms in sanitation, food production, and biotechnology. The lab focuses on methods for growing and studying diverse microbes. 2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (020279)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Intermediate Algebra.
A survey of the principles of chemistry, primarily for students in agriculture, industry and technology, and pre-nursing. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001826)
Prerequisites: Second-year high school algebra; one year high school chemistry. (One year of high school physics and one year of high school mathematics past Algebra II are recommended.)
Principles of chemistry for students in science, medical, and related professions. Atomic structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, periodic table, gases, solids, liquids, solutions, and equilibrium. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001816)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or CHEM 111 or equivalent.
A survey of organic chemistry primarily for agriculture, industry and technology, and pre-nursing students. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001828)
Prerequisites: CHEM 112.
An introduction to the theory and mechanism of organic reactions. To be followed by CHEM 370, which completes the two-semester sequence for science majors. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001840)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Completion of ELM requirement; MATH 118, MATH 119 (or High School equivalents).
This course covers the fundamental concepts and techniques of differential and integral calculus with an introduction to differential equations. Emphasis on applications from the Life Sciences. This course is not intended for majors in mathematics, physics, chemistry, or engineering. No credit for students with credit in MATH 120. A grade of C- or higher is required for GE credit. 4 hours discussion. (005512)
Prerequisites: Completion of ELM requirement; both MATH 118 and MATH 119 (or high school equivalent); a score that meets department guidelines on a department administered calculus readiness exam.
Limits and continuity. The derivative and applications to related rates, maxma and minima, and curve sketching. Transcendental functions. An introduction to the definite integral and area. A grade of C- or higher is required for GE credit. 4 hours discussion. (005506)

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Study of the structure of the human body, to include muscles, bones, heart, brain, ear, eye, and other systems, as well as a short look at development of the fetus. Lab work entails dissection of the cat and study of the human skeleton. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001110)
Basic functioning of the organ systems of the human body, including the brain and nervous system; vision and hearing; heart and circulation; blood and immunity; respiration, digestion and metabolism; muscles; excretory, endocrine, and reproductive systems. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001114)
Prerequisites: BIOL 151 or faculty permission; recommend CHEM 112 or concurrent enrollment.
Introduction to evolutionary history and biological diversity, microbes and protists, invertebrates, vertebrates, and plants. Form and function of plants and animals. Ecological principles. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001123)
Prerequisites: CHEM 108.
A survey of biochemistry, principally for agriculture, child development, and nursing students. Normally not open to chemistry or biological sciences majors. 3 hours discussion. (001849)
Prerequisites: High school chemistry or physics is recommended; students with no previous science courses are advised to enroll in GEOS 101. No college credit for those who have passed GEOS 101.
Physical and chemical processes in the earth, including origin and identification of rocks and minerals; earth's interior; movements and major features of the earth's crust; erosion and sedimentation; geological structures; topographic maps; mineral resources. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (004069)
Prerequisites: PHYS 202A with a grade of C- or higher.
Light, electricity, magnetism, selected topics in modern physics. Science majors are encouraged to take PHYS 204B instead of this course. Algebra and trigonometry are used. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (007395)

Environmental Health course requirements: 19 units

7 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: CHEM 108 or CHEM 270.
A brief introduction to the principles of toxicology and presentation of facts about current issues related to toxic substances, with special expanded emphasis on environmental aspects of topics presented in CHEM 345. 2 hours discussion. (001880)
Prerequisites: BIOL 151 or NSCI 102; CHEM 107 or CHEM 111; MATH 109 or MATH 120; junior standing.
Introduction to water quality, water supply, distribution, and drinking water treatment; wastewater collection, treatment, and disposal. Disease transmission; water quality parameters; physical, chemical, and biological processes in the treatment of water, wastewater, and biosolids. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (001529)
Introduction of concepts and techniques of geographic information system analysis and the presentation of map data. The course introduces the ArcMap application. Not for geography majors. 1 hour lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (020348)
This course provides a survey of administrative functions within public health and health education programs. Major approaches to motivation, leadership, conflict management, supervision, and budgeting are presented. Concepts of marketing, public policy, administrative law and public health disaster response are addressed. 3 hours lecture. (020438)
An overview of the relationship of people and nature; the impact of environmental conditions, such as water and air pollution, solid wastes, food contamination, vectors, radiation, noise, light, which cause deleterious effects on people's physical, mental, and social well-being. Individual and collective consumer intervention in environmental health problems. 3 hours discussion. (001606)
Prerequisites: MATH 105. Recommended: HCSV 320.
Study of the patterns of the major chronic and infectious diseases. Both individual- and population-based approaches to prevention and control will be examined. 3 hours discussion. (001607)
Investigation and analysis of the political nature of the environmental crisis in the United States and the development of legal and administrative mechanisms for handling environmental problems. 3 hours lecture. (007596)

The Option in Gerontology: 46 units

14 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Basic functioning of the organ systems of the human body, including the brain and nervous system; vision and hearing; heart and circulation; blood and immunity; respiration, digestion and metabolism; muscles; excretory, endocrine, and reproductive systems. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001114)
An introduction to computer software applications used in health education. Students have hands-on experience developing electronic resources for publishing health educaton CD-ROMs and Web sites. Skills learned may also be used for desktop publishing. Other topics addressed include digital photography, video, scanning, graphic design, archiving, professional presentations, academic databases, and evaluating electronic resources. 3 hours discussion. (004434)
Prerequisites: BIOL 104 is strongly recommended.
Examines the major chronic and communicable diseases, including cause, prevention, and treatment strategies. Behaviors that promote health and reduce premature death and disease are also addressed. 3 hours lecture. (001574)
This course provides a survey of administrative functions within public health and health education programs. Major approaches to motivation, leadership, conflict management, supervision, and budgeting are presented. Concepts of marketing, public policy, administrative law and public health disaster response are addressed. 3 hours lecture. (020438)
This course introduces health education theory, curricula, resources, and marketing techniques for use in school and community settings. Students plan, develop, implement, and evaluate effective health education and promotion programs. Students practice professional health education techniques while working with a local organization to implement a community health education. 3 hours lecture. (001613)
Provides an overview of the U.S. healthcare delivery system from historical, organizational, financial, and administrative perspectives. Analyzes current health issues, such as cost, access, and quality of care. 3 hours seminar. (001583)
Prerequisites: MATH 105. Recommended: HCSV 320.
Study of the patterns of the major chronic and infectious diseases. Both individual- and population-based approaches to prevention and control will be examined. 3 hours discussion. (001607)
Prerequisites: HCSV 321, HCSV 369, or faculty permission.
Examines theory and methods to facilitate individual and group behavior change to promote health and reduce risks of premature morbidity and mortality. Concepts in the behavioral sciences affecting health behavior, motivation, decision-making, and risk-taking are explored. Students will develop program planning and evaluation skills. 3 hours discussion. (001615)
Exploration of changing health status and needs in later life. Discussion of body system changes, bio-psycho-social influences on elders' health, health enhancement strategies, common health problems, treatment, and prevention. Also addresses drug use and abuse, sexuality, chronic illness, use of health delivery systems, including long-term care. 3 hours lecture. (001569)
Studies the changes people face as they age in modern society, as individual social beings and as members of a larger society; how social change (economic, political, technological) affects older people in their aging patterns; emphasis is on the social aspects of problems and prospects for America's elders. 3 hours lecture. (001571)
Knowledge and skill development in writing grant proposals for health and community services. Skills in researching government, foundation, and corporate funding opportunities. Diversifying nonprofit income through other fundraising strategies. 3 hours seminar. (001618)
An introduction to the psychological processes and phenomena associated with middle and older adulthood. 3 hours lecture. (004457)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200, or faculty permission.
Methods and skills to effectively provide recreation services for elders in a variety of settings; current issues and problems involved in providing leisure and recreation services for the elders; examination of the value of recreation activities in the lives of elders with regard to relatives and friends as well as oneself; resources for providing leisure programs and pre-retirement planning. Requires out-of-class activity with senior programs. Helpful to all disciplines working with senior citizens. 3 hours lecture. (004440)
Examines major social policies, legislation, programs, models of service delivery, and funding related to the needs and concerns of older adults living in the US. Barriers to service availability and delivery to older populations-at-risk, and types of advocacy efforts to promote policy change are addressed. 3 hours lecture. (001570)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Students participate in and monitor the results of a training program in swimming, running, weight training, cycling, or aerobics. Lectures explore the body's response to exercise and how to best exercise. Information and guidelines on how to begin or maintain a program of healthy and enjoyable exercise are presented. Topics discussed include the values of exercise, the body's responses to exercise and training, fitness assessment, exercise prescription, exercise and the environment, exercise for special populations, and sports nutrition. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (006967)
Prerequisites: BIOL 104; NFSC 100 or NFSC 340.
A survey of nutritional needs from conception to death, including the relationship of nutrients to health and well-being and factors which affect food selection of different population groups. 3 hours discussion. (004298)
Prerequisite: NFSC 360 or faculty permission.
Designed to provide an overview of the physiological, socioeconomic, psychological, and environmental factors affecting the nutritional status and requirements of older adults. Policies and programs related to health care and nutrition services for older Americans is also addressed. 3 hours lecture. (020612)
A study of the religious, ethical, spiritual, psychological, and socio-cultural dimensions of dying, death, and afterlife. Reading and discussion of issues surrounding dying (dying as one's last career, patient-centered approaches, spirit/body relationships); death (definitions, religious meanings, ritual practices); and afterlife (religious conceptions, relation to the human quest for meaning). 3 hours seminar.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. Formerly RELS 264. (004443)

The Option in Health Education: 46-48 units

13 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Basic functioning of the organ systems of the human body, including the brain and nervous system; vision and hearing; heart and circulation; blood and immunity; respiration, digestion and metabolism; muscles; excretory, endocrine, and reproductive systems. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001114)
An introduction to computer software applications used in health education. Students have hands-on experience developing electronic resources for publishing health educaton CD-ROMs and Web sites. Skills learned may also be used for desktop publishing. Other topics addressed include digital photography, video, scanning, graphic design, archiving, professional presentations, academic databases, and evaluating electronic resources. 3 hours discussion. (004434)
Overview of human sexuality, including psychosexual development, gender roles, reproductive system, pregnancy and childbirth, contraception, abortion, sexually transmitted diseases inlcuding HIV/AIDS, relationships, sexual orientation, sex and the law, sexually explicit materials, and sexual dysfunction. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (004384)
Prerequisites: BIOL 104 is strongly recommended.
Examines the major chronic and communicable diseases, including cause, prevention, and treatment strategies. Behaviors that promote health and reduce premature death and disease are also addressed. 3 hours lecture. (001574)
This course provides a survey of administrative functions within public health and health education programs. Major approaches to motivation, leadership, conflict management, supervision, and budgeting are presented. Concepts of marketing, public policy, administrative law and public health disaster response are addressed. 3 hours lecture. (020438)
An overview of the relationship of people and nature; the impact of environmental conditions, such as water and air pollution, solid wastes, food contamination, vectors, radiation, noise, light, which cause deleterious effects on people's physical, mental, and social well-being. Individual and collective consumer intervention in environmental health problems. 3 hours discussion. (001606)
This course introduces health education theory, curricula, resources, and marketing techniques for use in school and community settings. Students plan, develop, implement, and evaluate effective health education and promotion programs. Students practice professional health education techniques while working with a local organization to implement a community health education. 3 hours lecture. (001613)
An overview of the use and abuse of alcohol, prescription and street drugs, and their personal and societal consequences on the young adult, the family, and society. Historical perspectives, legal issues, and decision-making skills regarding drug use will also be addressed. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (004435)
Prerequisites: MATH 105. Recommended: HCSV 320.
Study of the patterns of the major chronic and infectious diseases. Both individual- and population-based approaches to prevention and control will be examined. 3 hours discussion. (001607)
Examination of nature and factors affecting mental health and positive and negative responses to problems in daily living. Discussion of types of mental disorders and public health strategies to deal with these problems. 3 hours discussion. (001611)
Prerequisites: HCSV 321, HCSV 369, or faculty permission.
Examines theory and methods to facilitate individual and group behavior change to promote health and reduce risks of premature morbidity and mortality. Concepts in the behavioral sciences affecting health behavior, motivation, decision-making, and risk-taking are explored. Students will develop program planning and evaluation skills. 3 hours discussion. (001615)
Knowledge and skill development in writing grant proposals for health and community services. Skills in researching government, foundation, and corporate funding opportunities. Diversifying nonprofit income through other fundraising strategies. 3 hours seminar. (001618)
Prerequisites: One lower-division course in biological sciences.
Analyzes and evaluates current practices and theories regarding nutrition and its relationship to athletics, weight control, and physical exercise. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (004288)

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Study of the structure of the human body, to include muscles, bones, heart, brain, ear, eye, and other systems, as well as a short look at development of the fetus. Lab work entails dissection of the cat and study of the human skeleton. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001110)
Prerequisites: BIOL 103, BIOL 104, BIOL 151, or NSCI 102; CHEM 107, CHEM 108, or CHEM 111.
Introduction to structure/function, metabolism, genetics, ecological interactions and pathogenic mechanisms of microorganisms. In addition, the roles of microorganisms in sanitation and in the food and biotechnology industries will be discussed. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001132)
Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.
An examination of ecological principles and the impact of increasing population and technology upon the environment. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (001156)
Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or CHEM 111 or equivalent.
A survey of organic chemistry primarily for agriculture, industry and technology, and pre-nursing students. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001828)
Analysis of historical and current health problems in the world: population dynamics, vital statistics, global disease patterns, and variations among nations and cultures. Examination of contributing social, psychological, physical, governmental, and cultural factors affecting disease. Efforts toward health promotion and disease prevention, including international programs. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (004412)
Examination of major health care consumer issues from historical and contemporary perspectives. Discussion of cost, availability, and quality of health care and their relationship to political and economic activities. Identification of national, regional, and local health trends affecting consumers. Analysis of individual and collective consumer strategies. 3 hours lecture. (004445)
An examination of the status, needs, and trends in the health of America's children, including selected racial/ethnic groups. The course includes an overview of physical growth and development from the prenatal period to early adolescence; discussion of common health problems, causes, symptoms, treatment, and prevention; and addresses selected health issues such as diet, physical activity, stress, violence, drugs, sexuality, and environmental risks. An overview of current and potential health services and prevention programs for children is included. 3 hours discussion. (004441)
This course is also offered as WMST 368 .
This course represents an overview of health care issues faced by women throughout the life cycle. The course begins an examination of scientific inquiry and the study of disease in women. Then, using sociological, political, and behavioral sciences, the roles, rights, and responsibilities of women in the health care system are assessed. The course concludes with a biological review of the female body and specific health care problems common to women. This course encompasses a woman-centered philosophy which encourages women's active participation in their health care decisions. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (004381)
Provides an overview of the U.S. healthcare delivery system from historical, organizational, financial, and administrative perspectives. Analyzes current health issues, such as cost, access, and quality of care. 3 hours seminar. (001583)
Addresses major health issues affecting the child, including, but not limited to, health promotion and disease prevention, nutrition, substance use and abuse, and sexuality. Overview of health instruction framework for California public schools. Fulfills the state health education requirement for a preliminary teaching credential. 3 hours discussion. (004393)
Addresses major health issues affecting the adolescent, including, but not limited to, health promotion and disease prevention, nutrition, substance use and abuse, and sexuality. Fulfills the state health education requirement for a preliminary teaching credential. 3 hours discussion. (004394)
Prerequisite: HCSV 369 recommended.
Philosophical framework, organization, administration, and legal aspects of the school health program. Development of prevention and intervention strategies for major health problems affecting K-12 students, with emphasis on cultural sensitivity, at-risk youth, and community/school partnerships. 3 hours seminar. (004466)
Exploration of changing health status and needs in later life. Discussion of body system changes, bio-psycho-social influences on elders' health, health enhancement strategies, common health problems, treatment, and prevention. Also addresses drug use and abuse, sexuality, chronic illness, use of health delivery systems, including long-term care. 3 hours lecture. (001569)

Note: Students seeking the Single Subject Waiver in Health Science are required to take HCSV 325 and HCSV 462.

The Option in Health Services Administration: 45 units

13 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A study of financial reports, their construction and use. Procedures are introduced to the extent necessary to illustrate basic concepts. Designed to meet the needs of prospective accounting majors, students of business administration, and students seeking a general education. 3 hours discussion. (000077)
Prerequisites: ACCT 201 (or ABUS 261 for ABUS majors only).
The application of appropriate techniques and concepts in processing historical and projected economic data to assist managerial planning, controlling, and decision-making. Selected topics include cost concepts, product costing, cost behavior, budgeting, standard cost analysis, relevant cost analysis, and contribution margin. 3 hours discussion. (000078)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
Emphasis is on solving business problems through the strategic design of verbal, print, and electronic messages. Models for effective business documents, presentations, meetings, and interpersonal as well as electronic project interaction are applied to business communication problems. Related technology use, etiquette, cultural differences, and ethical considerations are highlighted. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (005687)
An examination of the health care industry and its role in fulfilling national health needs. Topics include national health insurance, health financing, and resource allocation. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002667)
Provides knowledge and skills to administer health organizations and programs. Concepts of planning, organizational behavior, and management applicable to the administration of health organizations and programs are addressed. Major approaches to management, motivation, leadership, decision making, supervision, and budgeting are presented. 3 hours seminar. (001582)
Study of specific areas of law, ethics, and regulations in health care. Examination of legal and ethical issues of licensing, health insurance, managed care, funding mechanisms, medical negligence and malpractice, informed consent, health care records, and patient and family rights. 3 hours seminar. (004452)
Prerequisites: ACCT 201 and HCSV 330 or permission of instructor.
Examines the internal operations of health services organizations (e.g. ambulatory care, long-term care, managed care), and applies management principles including marketing, financing, legal issues, personnel issues, and quality management. 3 hours seminar. (004455)
Provides an overview of the U.S. healthcare delivery system from historical, organizational, financial, and administrative perspectives. Analyzes current health issues, such as cost, access, and quality of care. 3 hours seminar. (001583)
Prerequisites: ACCT 201, ACCT 202, MATH 105.
This course provides an understanding of the process of making asset choices for the provision of health care, stewarding the assets particular to healthcare organizations (both for-profit and not-for-profit), and obtaining funds to pay for healthcare- specific assets. Includes traditional techniques of finance, but focuses on the state of the art in the theory and practice of healthcare financial management, including agency theory, valuation, capitated contract analysis, and endowment management. 3 hours discussion. (004438)
Prerequisites: HCSV 431.
This course is also offered as POLS 405 .
An analysis of the political forces, both private and public, which have an impact upon the health industry in the United States. Focusing on problems related to the delivery of health care, the course will cover such issues as availability, accessibility, appropriateness, acceptance, accounting, and alternatives. 3 hours seminar. (001587)
Prerequisites: HCSV 330 and HCSV 431, or faculty permission.
Integration of theory and practice by examining issues and solutions to problems in the management and planning of health care services. Emphasis upon case studies and practitioner responses. 3 hours seminar. (001596)
This course surveys human resource management practices needed for effective performance by every manager and employee. The focus of the course is on processes used to effectively recruit, select, develop, evaluate, reward, and ensure the safety of employees in order to attract and retain the best possible workforce in any organization. This course provides students with an understanding of workforce diversity, investigates ethical issues, and explores the international context of HRM. 3 hours lecture. (005690)
This course introduces students to the concept of information systems as the application of technical resources to support organizational processes. Given this foundation, students build an integrative, process-oriented understanding of information systems and their deployment, management, and use within distributed and global organizations. Projects focus on introductory enterprise systems, fundamentals of database systems, and basic Web programming. For this course, students are expected to have demonstrated proficiency in the use of microcomputers and office automation software including word processing, spreadsheets, and desktop databases. A proficiency exam is given during the first week of each semester and students are encouraged to take this exam in advance of the semester they intend to enroll in the class. Students who lack such knowledge may wish to enroll in appropriate undergraduate courses prior to attempting this course. This course is designed for BADM majors. 3 hours lecture. (005770)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: BIOL 104 is strongly recommended.
Examines the major chronic and communicable diseases, including cause, prevention, and treatment strategies. Behaviors that promote health and reduce premature death and disease are also addressed. 3 hours lecture. (001574)
Prerequisites: MATH 105. Recommended: HCSV 320.
Study of the patterns of the major chronic and infectious diseases. Both individual- and population-based approaches to prevention and control will be examined. 3 hours discussion. (001607)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: BIOL 104 is strongly recommended.
Examines the major chronic and communicable diseases, including cause, prevention, and treatment strategies. Behaviors that promote health and reduce premature death and disease are also addressed. 3 hours lecture. (001574)

Note: May be used to satisfy this requirement if not used above.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: HCSV 431 or equivalent or faculty permission.
This course will examine the emergency medical services (EMS) system as a vital component of the health care delivery system. Course work will focus on administration and planning of EMS systems. 3 hours seminar. (004458)
Prerequisites: HCSV 330 or equivalent or faculty permission.
This course will apply management principles including marketing, financing, personnel issues, and quality management to organizations within the emergency medical services system (e.g., ambulance services, trauma centers). 3 hours seminar. (004459)
Prerequisites: MATH 105. Recommended: HCSV 320.
Study of the patterns of the major chronic and infectious diseases. Both individual- and population-based approaches to prevention and control will be examined. 3 hours discussion. (001607)

Note: May be used to satisfy this requirement if not used above.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Exploration of changing health status and needs in later life. Discussion of body system changes, bio-psycho-social influences on elders' health, health enhancement strategies, common health problems, treatment, and prevention. Also addresses drug use and abuse, sexuality, chronic illness, use of health delivery systems, including long-term care. 3 hours lecture. (001569)
Knowledge and skill development in writing grant proposals for health and community services. Skills in researching government, foundation, and corporate funding opportunities. Diversifying nonprofit income through other fundraising strategies. 3 hours seminar. (001618)
Nature and functions of marketing systems and marketing in the individual firm. Study of the marketing mix, marketing institutions, and the environments in which marketing decisions are made. 3 hours lecture. (005872)

Or any 300 or 400 level course from the College of Business with permission of the Health Services Administration advisor.

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

The BS in Health Science signifies readiness for an entry-level career in specific health-related fields. Most courses in each option have been designated as competency courses and are vital to what a professional in this field should know and be able to do. Students who earn below a C- in those courses are required to repeat the course and earn a C- or better for the course to count in the major. For the Options in Environmental Health, Gerontology, and Health Education, the courses include all upper-division HCSV courses required for the major. For the Health Services Administration Option, the courses include all required upper-division courses for the major.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  1. You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  2. You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  3. Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  4. Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  5. Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  6. Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

Catalog Cycle:12