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The Bachelor of Science in Mathematics

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120-123 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Degree MAPs page in the University Catalog or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Literacy Requirement:

See Mathematics and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog. Writing proficiency in the major is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of a course in your major which has been designated as the Writing Proficiency (WP) course for the semester in which you take the course. Students who earn below a C- are required to repeat the course and earn a C- or higher to receive WP credit. See the Class Schedule for the designated WP courses for each semester. You must pass ENGL 130I or JOUR 130I (or equivalent) with a C- or higher before you may register for a WP course.

Course Requirements for the Major: 49-50 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree. Additional required courses, depending upon the selected option or advising pattern, are outlined following the major core program requirements.

Enrollment in any mathematics course requires a grade of C- or higher in all prerequisite courses or their transfer equivalents.

Major Core Program: 24-25 units

6 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Completion of ELM requirement; both MATH 118 and MATH 119 (or high school equivalent); a score that meets department guidelines on a department administered calculus readiness exam.
Limits and continuity. The derivative and applications to related rates, maxma and minima, and curve sketching. Transcendental functions. An introduction to the definite integral and area. A grade of C- or higher is required for GE credit. 4 hours discussion. (005506)
Prerequisites: MATH 120.
The definite integral and applications to area, volume, work, differential equations, etc. Sequences and series, vectors and analytic geometry in 2 and 3-space, polar coordinates, and parametric equations. 4 hours discussion. (005507)
Prerequisites: MATH 121.
Vector functions and space curves. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Vector calculus line integrals, surface integrals, divergence/curl, Green's Theorem, Divergence Theorem, and Stokes' Theorem. 4 hours discussion. (005508)
Prerequisites: MATH 121.
Matrices, determinants, cartesian n-space (basis and dimension of a subspace, rank, change of basis), linear transformations, eigenvalues. Numerical problems will be emphasized. 3 hours discussion. (005553)
Prerequisites: MATH 121.
A survey of elementary principles of logic, emphasizing the nature of proof. Standard methods of proof will be illustrated with examples from various branches of mathematics, including set theory and the theory of functions and relations. Other possible sources of examples include the calculus, number theory, theory of equations, topology of the real line. 3 hours seminar. (005530)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, MATH 220, MATH 330, upper-division standing.
Limits, continuity, uniform continuity, the definite integral, series, convergence, uniform convergence, and metric spaces. Differentiation and integration of functions of several variables. Transformation of multiple integrals. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (005575)

The MATH 120, MATH 121, MATH 220 sequence should be started as early as possible, provided the student has the necessary background. MATH 118 and MATH 119 (or their equivalents) are required pre-calculus courses for MATH 120.

Some upper-division courses require only MATH 120 or MATH 121 as a prerequisite. Refer to catalog course listings when choosing courses.

Computer Literacy Requirement: A passing grade in one of the following classes or its transfer equivalent.

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Programming for students not majoring in Computer Science or Engineering. This course introduces students to programming using an integrated graphical development environment. Event-driven, visual, and object-oriented programming concepts are presented. Projects include common business problems that require data entry, display of calculated results, report requests, conditional testing, arithmetic operations, array processing, data validation, searching, sorting, reading and writing to files, and database applications. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (002298)
Prerequisites: At least one year of high school algebra and strong computer skills or CSCI 101.
A first-semester programming course, providing an overview of computer systems and an introduction to problem solving and software design using procedural object-oriented programming languages. Coverage includes the software life cycle, as well as algorithms and their role in software design. Students are expected to design, implement, and test a number of programs. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002281)
Prerequisites: MATH 121, no previous computer experience required.
An introduction to the use of mathematical computer software. This course provides an introduction to a programming environment, preparing math majors to use computers to explore and solve varied math problems. The software used in this class depends on the instructor and may be chosen from Mathematica, GP/PARI, GAP, SAS, R, etc. This course satisfies the computer literacy requirement for mathematics majors. 3 hours discussion. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (005526)

Major Option Course Requirements: 25-26 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required dependent upon the option chosen. Students must select one of the following options for completion of the major course requirements.

The General Option in Mathematics: 25 units

4 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: MATH 121.
First order separable, linear, and exact equations; second order linear equations, Laplace transforms, series solutions at an ordinary point, systems of first order linear equations, and applications. 4 hours discussion. (005509)
Prerequisites: MATH 121.
Basic concepts of probability theory, random variables and their distributions, limit theorems, sampling theory, topics in statistical inference, regression, and correlation. 3 hours discussion. (005534)
Prerequisites: MATH 420.
Continuation of MATH 420. 3 hours discussion. (005576)
Prerequisites: MATH 220.
Algebra of Complex Numbers, Cauchy-Riemann Equations, the exponential, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions, complex integration and Cauchy integral formula, Taylor and Laurent series, the residue theorem, conformal mapping, and applications. 3 hours discussion. (005577)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: MATH 220, MATH 330.
An exploration of axioms and models for Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries focusing on the independence of the Parallel Postulate. Additional topics will be chosen from Euclidean plane geometry, transformation geometry, and the geometry of polyhedra. 3 hours discussion. (005561)
Prerequisites: MATH 220, MATH 330.
Axiomatic geometry of the projective plane. Duality, collineations, correlations, polarities, and conics. 3 hours discussion. (005564)
Prerequisites: MATH 220, MATH 330.
The geometry of curves and surfaces in Euclidean 3-space. 3 hours discussion. (005566)
Prerequisites: MATH 220, MATH 330.
Metric spaces, continuous functions, homeomorphisms, separation, and covering axioms, connectedness. 3 hours discussion. (005563)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: MATH 220, MATH 330, MATH 335.
Vector spaces, linear operators, bilinear forms and scalar products, unitary spaces; matrix polynomials, eigenvalues, and Jordan normal form. 3 hours discussion. (005581)
Prerequisites: MATH 220, MATH 235, MATH 330.
Introduction to basic algebraic structures such as groups, ring, and fields. The fundamental concepts of homomorphism, subgroup, normal subgroup and factor group of a group as well as subring, ideal and factor ring of a ring; permutation groups and matrix groups. 3 hours discussion. (005582)

6 units selected from:

Any upper-division Mathematics (MATH) courses except MATH 302, MATH 304, MATH 305, MATH 310, MATH 311, MATH 314, MATH 341, MATH 342, and MATH 441.

The Option in Applied Mathematics: 25 units

7 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: MATH 121.
First order separable, linear, and exact equations; second order linear equations, Laplace transforms, series solutions at an ordinary point, systems of first order linear equations, and applications. 4 hours discussion. (005509)
Prerequisites: MATH 121.
Basic concepts of probability theory, random variables and their distributions, limit theorems, sampling theory, topics in statistical inference, regression, and correlation. 3 hours discussion. (005534)
Prerequisites: MATH 260.
Systems of first order linear equations, existence and uniqueness theorems, stability, Sturm separation theorems, power series methods. 3 hours discussion. (005538)
Prerequisites: MATH 260.
Partial differential equations, separation of variables, orthogonal sets of functions, Sturm-Liouville problems, Fourier series, boundary value problems for the wave equation, heat equation, and Laplace equation; Bessel functions, Legendre polynomials. 3 hours discussion. (005540)
Prerequisites: MATH 260 (may be taken concurrently), MATH 335, completion of the computer literacy requirement. MATH 460 is not a prerequisite for MATH 461.
Approximation; numerical integration; numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations; interpolation and extrapolation. 3 hours discussion. (005584)
Prerequisites: MATH 220.
Algebra of Complex Numbers, Cauchy-Riemann Equations, the exponential, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions, complex integration and Cauchy integral formula, Taylor and Laurent series, the residue theorem, conformal mapping, and applications. 3 hours discussion. (005577)
Prerequisites: MATH 260, MATH 335.
The translation of real world phenomena into mathematical language. Possible applications include population and competing species models, mathematical theories of war, traffic flow, river pollution, water waves and tidal dynamics, probabilistic and simulation models. 3 hours discussion. (005592)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: MATH 260; MATH 360 and MATH 335 are recommended.
An introduction to the study of non-linear dynamical systems. Both discrete and continuous systems will be studied using classical analysis combined with geometric techniques and computer simulation. Areas of application include fractal geometry, coding theory, fluid turbulence, population fluctuation, and chaotic vibrations of structures and circuits. 3 hours discussion. (005588)
Prerequisites: MATH 260; MATH 361 is recommended.
Classical problems in the calculus of variations. Euler-Lagrange equations. Isoperimetric problems, Fermat's principle. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics of particles. Two independent variables. Applications to physics and engineering. 3 hours discussion. (005590)

The Option in Mathematics Education: 25-26 units

The following program, together with the major core program, fulfills all requirements for the Single Subject Matter Preparation Program in Mathematics.

8 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This seminar and the associated CAVE field experience give prospective teachers early exposure to issues relevant to the profession of teaching secondary mathematics. In particular, the experience helps these future teachers develop a deeper understanding of the K-12 mathematics curriculum, understand connections between their university subject matter preparation and K-12 academic content, and reflect on developmental and social factors that affect K-12 students' learning of mathematics. 1 hour seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (020432)
Prerequisites: MATH 120 or MATH 109 (may be taken concurrently).
Design of statistical experiments, graphing, sampling techniques, probability, and common probability distributions will be discussed, with an emphasis on practical applications. Uses and misuses of statistics, misrepresentation of data, and proper and improper statistical analyses will be discussed. 3 hours discussion. (005532)
Prerequisites: MATH 220 and at least one upper-division mathematics course.
MATH 330 is recommended. Study of the historical development of mathematics, with particular emphasis on the relationship between mathematics and society. 3 hours discussion. (005531)
Prerequisites: MATH 121, MATH 330.
Basic properties of the integers, division algorithm, fundamental theorem of arithmetic, number-theoretic functions, Diophantine equations, congruences, quadratic residues, continued fractions. 3 hours discussion. (005585)
Prerequisites: MATH 121.
This course is designed to supplement the mathematical background of the candidate for the single subject credential in mathematics. The mathematical topics will be discussed from the student's and the teacher's points of view to aid the candidate in making the transition to secondary school mathematics. Topics include mathematical problem-solving, conceptual ideas using algebra, geometry, and functions, incorporating technology into the mathematics curriculum, and finite systems. 3 hours seminar. (005544)
Prerequisites: MATH 341.
This course focuses on having students examine mathematical pedagogy and the understanding and evaluations of students as mathematical learners as it analyzes secondary mathematics curriculum from an advanced standpoint. Students will have opportunities to be involved in the facilitation of mathematical learning. Topics include: history of mathematics education, contemporary mathematics curricula, problem solving, mathematical reasoning and methods of proof, mathematical learning theories, communication, assessment and collaborative learning communities. 3 hours discussion. (005545)
Prerequisites: MATH 220, MATH 330.
An exploration of axioms and models for Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries focusing on the independence of the Parallel Postulate. Additional topics will be chosen from Euclidean plane geometry, transformation geometry, and the geometry of polyhedra. 3 hours discussion. (005561)
Prerequisites: MATH 220, MATH 235, MATH 330.
Introduction to basic algebraic structures such as groups, ring, and fields. The fundamental concepts of homomorphism, subgroup, normal subgroup and factor group of a group as well as subring, ideal and factor ring of a ring; permutation groups and matrix groups. 3 hours discussion. (005582)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: MATH 121.
First order separable, linear, and exact equations; second order linear equations, Laplace transforms, series solutions at an ordinary point, systems of first order linear equations, and applications. 4 hours discussion. (005509)

Or any upper-division Mathematics (MATH) courses except MATH 302, MATH 304, MATH 310,and MATH 311. MATH 344 recommended.

Additional requirements:

A 15-hour mathematics field experience is required. MATH 241 fulfills this requirement.

All course work choices and the choice of field experience should be made after consulting an advisor.

Subject matter preparation requirements are governed by federal and state legislative action and approval of the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Requirements may change between catalogs. Please consult with your departmental credential advisor for current information.

The Option in Mathematics Education - Credential Path: 73-75 units

The following program, together with the major core program, fulfills all requirements for both a degree in Mathematics (Mathematics Education Option) and the Single Subject Credential in Mathematics.

Mathematics

8 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This seminar and the associated CAVE field experience give prospective teachers early exposure to issues relevant to the profession of teaching secondary mathematics. In particular, the experience helps these future teachers develop a deeper understanding of the K-12 mathematics curriculum, understand connections between their university subject matter preparation and K-12 academic content, and reflect on developmental and social factors that affect K-12 students' learning of mathematics. 1 hour seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (020432)
Prerequisites: MATH 120 or MATH 109 (may be taken concurrently).
Design of statistical experiments, graphing, sampling techniques, probability, and common probability distributions will be discussed, with an emphasis on practical applications. Uses and misuses of statistics, misrepresentation of data, and proper and improper statistical analyses will be discussed. 3 hours discussion. (005532)
Prerequisites: MATH 220 and at least one upper-division mathematics course.
MATH 330 is recommended. Study of the historical development of mathematics, with particular emphasis on the relationship between mathematics and society. 3 hours discussion. (005531)
Prerequisites: MATH 121, MATH 330.
Basic properties of the integers, division algorithm, fundamental theorem of arithmetic, number-theoretic functions, Diophantine equations, congruences, quadratic residues, continued fractions. 3 hours discussion. (005585)
Prerequisites: MATH 121.
This course is designed to supplement the mathematical background of the candidate for the single subject credential in mathematics. The mathematical topics will be discussed from the student's and the teacher's points of view to aid the candidate in making the transition to secondary school mathematics. Topics include mathematical problem-solving, conceptual ideas using algebra, geometry, and functions, incorporating technology into the mathematics curriculum, and finite systems. 3 hours seminar. (005544)
Prerequisites: MATH 341.
This course focuses on having students examine mathematical pedagogy and the understanding and evaluations of students as mathematical learners as it analyzes secondary mathematics curriculum from an advanced standpoint. Students will have opportunities to be involved in the facilitation of mathematical learning. Topics include: history of mathematics education, contemporary mathematics curricula, problem solving, mathematical reasoning and methods of proof, mathematical learning theories, communication, assessment and collaborative learning communities. 3 hours discussion. (005545)
Prerequisites: MATH 220, MATH 330.
An exploration of axioms and models for Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries focusing on the independence of the Parallel Postulate. Additional topics will be chosen from Euclidean plane geometry, transformation geometry, and the geometry of polyhedra. 3 hours discussion. (005561)
Prerequisites: MATH 220, MATH 235, MATH 330.
Introduction to basic algebraic structures such as groups, ring, and fields. The fundamental concepts of homomorphism, subgroup, normal subgroup and factor group of a group as well as subring, ideal and factor ring of a ring; permutation groups and matrix groups. 3 hours discussion. (005582)

Education

9 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prospective teachers examine socio-political issues of education relative to current demographics of California schools, integration of multicultural education, and promotion of social justice. Candidates identify, analyze, and minimize personal and institutional bias and explore the complexities of living and teaching in a pluralistic, multicultural society. Candidates identify barriers English Learners experience in becoming full participants in the school program and strategies for assisting students in overcoming these barriers. 3 hours lecture. (002977)
Teaching is an intellectual challenge that involves planning, facilitating, and reflecting on the process of student learning. Teacher candidates develop strategies necessary to create safe and structured learning environments and explore relationships among curriculum, instruction, assessment, and classroom climate to meet the needs of a diverse student population within a democratic society. This is a Single Subject Program course and is not applicable to a master's degree. 3 hours seminar. ABC/no credit grading. (002935)
This course examines issues of language and literacy development for first and second language learners with an emphasis on the adolescent learner. Theory and research on the effects of prior knowledge, motivation, and culture on reading and writing are addressed. Specific reading, writing, speaking, and listening strategies to support comprehension of academic content by diverse student populations are emphasized. Assessment techniques specific to literacy development are explored. The central theme of the course is helping students (grades 7-12) become strategic readers and critical consumers of information in a democratic society. This is a Single Subject Program course and is not applicable to a master's degree. 3 hours seminar. ABC/no credit grading. (002902)
This course focuses on legal mandates and practical instructional strategies for general education instructors working with the exceptional student. Content includes the general education teachers' obligations under IDEA and ADA, the nature and range of exceptional students, models within schools for supporting special populations and selection of appropriate instructional materials and teaching strategies. The course addresses teachers' attitudes toward inclusion and emphasizes the development of a positive climate of instruction for all special populations in the general classroom. This is a Single Subject Program course and is not applicable to a master's degree. 2 hours lecture. ABC/no credit grading. (002938)
This is the first of two teaching practica designed for mathematics teachers. It provides a developmental sequence of carefully planned substantive, supervised field experiences in the 7-12 classroom, including opportunities to observe and apply mathematics-specific pedagogy and democratic practices. This course is a Single Subject Program course and is not applicable to a master's degree program. 9 hours supervision. Credit/no credit grading. (020985)
This course increases the candidates' awareness and understanding of issues, trends, challenges, and democratic practices of their selected areas of specialization. Teacher candidates advance their knowledge and skills in teaching academic content standards-based curriculum in the subject area guided by multiple measures of assessing student learning. They make and reflect on instructional decisions informed by educational theories and research, state-adopted materials and frameworks, and consultations with other professionals. This course is a Single Subject Program course and is not applicable to a master's degree. 3 hours lecture. ABC/no credit grading. (002940)
Prerequisites: Capstone course to be taken in the final semester of the program.
To meet the needs of students in a democratic and diverse society, teachers must be change agents in their school and community. This capstone course advances candidates' knowledge and skills in developing applications for authentic democratic classroom and school practice. This course is a Single Subject Program course and is not applicable to a master's degree. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. ABC/no credit grading. (002941)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Practicum I (EDTE 535).
This second course in teaching practica continues the sequence of carefully planned substantive, supervised field experiences in the 7-12 grade classroom. Teacher candidate placements are determined through a collaborative effort of the University and colleagues in cooperating 7-12 grade schools. This is a Single Subject Program course and is not appplicable to a master's degree. 27 hours supervision. Credit/no credit grading. (002942)
Prerequisites: Conditional admission to a Professional Education Program.
This course is designed to help candidates understand how students' cognitive, personal-social, and physical development, and cultural and linguistic backgrounds are related to effective teaching and interpersonal relations in secondary schools. Major segments of instruction include the study of how students learn, remember, and make use of the knowledge they have acquired and how students' educational growth is assessed in schools. Each candidate begins to use this knowledge to organize and manage a learning environment that supports student development, motivation, and learning. This course is not applicable to a master's degree. 3 hours seminar. ABC/no credit grading. (015899)

Additional Requirements

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Effective oral communication. Introduction to human communication theory. Practice in gathering, organizing, and presenting material in speeches to persuade, inform, and interest. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (002206)
Addresses major health issues affecting the adolescent, including, but not limited to, health promotion and disease prevention, nutrition, substance use and abuse, and sexuality. Fulfills the state health education requirement for a preliminary teaching credential. 3 hours discussion. (004394)
An intensive introduction to the theory and practice of second language acquisition and teaching. 3 hours lecture. (020485)
An investigation of Who gets What, When, and How in national, state, and local politics. Also includes principles of American governmental institutions, federal systems, congress, president, and courts. Fulfills California state graduation and credential requirements for the American Constitution. (Satisfies requirement in California Administrative Code, Title 5, Section 40404.) 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007475)
Survey of American history. Development of the United States and its political, economic, social, and cultural institutions. From colonial times to the present. Satisfies requirement in California Administrative Code, Title 5, Education, Sec. 40404. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (004500)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: MATH 342.
Corequisites: Assignment as a Mathematics Department intern.
Supervised internship in teaching mathematics with accompanying seminar. Guidance in facilitation of mathematical learning. Topics include contemporary mathematics curriculum topics, mathematical learning theories, communication, and assessment. 3 hours seminar, 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (005546)
Prerequisites: MATH 342.
Completes a three course series, started with two semesters of Mathematics for the Credential, MATH 341 and MATH 342. Students compare instructional strategies and explore the role content and pedagogical content knowledge has in these strategies. Central to the class is a lesson study project which entails a cycle of lesson development, implementation, reflection and revision, and implementation again. Students concurrently enrolled in EDTE 535A, Teaching Practicum I for Blended Math Candidates, are able to implement their lesson as part of the practicum, and have a real context for the full content of the course. 3 hours lecture. (020978)

Note: A Major Academic Plan (MAP) is available for this option so students can complete it in four years. Please request a plan from your major advisor or view it at Degree MAPs . It is important to follow this plan carefully as there are several GE substitutions that apply only if the entire program is completed.

The Option in Statistics: 25 units

7 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: MATH 121.
First order separable, linear, and exact equations; second order linear equations, Laplace transforms, series solutions at an ordinary point, systems of first order linear equations, and applications. 4 hours discussion. (005509)
Prerequisites: Completion of ELM requirement. Introduction to common procedures used to analyze data.
Single and two sample inference, analysis of variance, mulitple regression, analysis of co-variance, experimental design, repeated measures, nonparametric procedures, and categorical data analysis. Examples are drawn from biology and related disciplines. Statistical packages are introduced. Appropriate for biology, agriculture, nutrition, psychology, social science and other majors. 3 hours discussion. (005568)
Prerequisites: MATH 121.
Basic concepts of probability theory, random variables and their distributions, limit theorems, sampling theory, topics in statistical inference, regression, and correlation. 3 hours discussion. (005534)
Prerequisites: MATH 350.
Continuation of MATH 350. 3 hours discussion. (005535)
Prerequisites: MATH 220, MATH 330, MATH 351.
A rigorous theoretical treatment of the following topics: transformations of random variables, estimation, Neyman-Pearson hypothesis testing, likelihood ratio tests, and Bayesian statistics. 3 hours discussion. (005562)
Prerequisites: MATH 315.
Advanced topics in applied statistics including multiple regression, multivariate methods, nonparametrics, analysis of covariance, bootstrap methods and others as appropriate. Statistical computer packages are introduced and used. Appropriate for biology, agriculture, nutrition, business, psychology, social science and other maojrs. 3 hours discussion. (005570)
Prerequisites: One course chosen from MATH 105, MATH 305, MATH 350, or MATH 315.
The theory and application of survey sampling techniques. Topics include simple random sampling, stratified sampling, systematic sampling, and cluster sampling. Appropriate for mathematics, computer science, psychology, social science, agriculture, biology, and other majors. 3 hours discussion. (005573)

3 units selected from:

Any upper-division mathematics (MATH) courses except MATH 302, MATH 304, MATH 310, MATH 311, MATH 314, MATH 341, MATH 342, and MATH 441.

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Enrollment in any mathematics course requires a grade of C- or higher in all prerequisite courses or their transfer equivalents.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

A student may complete more than one option in the major. Only courses specifically required by both options may be double counted.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  1. You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  2. You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  3. Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  4. Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  5. Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  6. Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

Honors in Mathematics

Well-qualified Mathematics majors are encouraged to apply for Honors in Mathematics. The program is open to junior and senior Mathematics majors who have completed 9 upper-division units (or a total of 24 units) in mathematics, including MATH 420 with a grade of B or better, and have a grade point average among the top 5% of junior-senior mathematics majors. Please visit the department office in HOLT 181 for further information.

Catalog Cycle:12