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The Certificate in Employee Services and Recreation

Course Requirements for the Certificate: 41 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required of all candidates for this certificate.

The National Employee Services and Recreation Association has approved the following program and will award a certificate in employee services and recreation to students who successfully complete:

Core Requirements: 26 units

10 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Introduction to basic camp management, outdoor-related skills, and outdoor leadership in a back-country environment. Exposure to the logistical planning process, risk management, environmental awareness/education, outdoor recreation programming, and psycho-social leadership skills. This course is applicable to all disciplines dealing with the management of people in a wilderness setting. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (008789)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
Theoretical and pragmatic application of outdoor leadership strategies and techniques for the provision of safe and satisfying formal outdoor recreation group experiences. Exposure to a laboratory leadership experience, with an emphasis on psycho-social leadership skills, including judgment and decision-making, risk management, and the emotional, intellectual, and physiological elements of effective outdoor leadership. Required field trips. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (008796)
First professional preparation course for majors and minors. Prerequisite to all upper-division required recreation courses for majors and minors. Sociology and social psychology of leisure. History of leisure in Western cultures. Philosophical foundations of leisure studies. Introduction to the principal journals and professional literature. Ethics and foundations of professional practice. Introduction to the principal professional organizations. Career and course of study planning. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (008779)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200 or faculty permission.
Theory and process of program planning, construction, operation, and evaluation as applicable to a variety of agencies and communities. Exposure to several types of programs serving different age groups, interests, and needs within a range of environments. Recruitment, use, and supervision of volunteers. Exploration of program areas in depth: social, cultural, physical, mental, and special events. Consideration of practical application. 3 hours lecture. (008781)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200 or faculty permission.
A study of the characteristics and needs of diverse populations, specifically related to the delivery of inclusive leisure services. In-depth discussion of personal and societal attitudes, stereotypes, cultural competencies, legislation, accessibility, and program modification. Learning experiences include volunteer work, guest speakers, and wheelchair experience. This course is applicable to all disciplines dealing with diverse populations. 3 hours lecture. (008785)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200, or faculty permission.
Study of the nature, scope, status, and historical development of professional leadership in recreation, parks, and special groups. Types, responsibilities, and criteria for positions. Professional preparation, certification, and licensing of personnel. Examination of professional body of knowledge, group dynamics, and theories of leadership. Competence, skills, and techniques of the supervisor and other professional personnel stressed. 3 hours lecture. (008822)
Prerequisites: RECR 200, RECR 220, or faculty permission.
This is an introduction to the fundamentals of event management. Topics include main categories of events professionalism, economic impact of the event industry, event planning, coordination, marketing, research, evaluation, revenue generation, sponsorship, programming, volunteer management, risk management, site planning, sustainable management, technology, operations, and logistics. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (008801)
This course is an independent study of special problems offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (008824)

RECR 399 must be taken for a minimum of 1 unit.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, successful completion of computer literacy requirement, RECR 200, RECR 301; one course chosen from RECR 220, RECR 240, RECR 250, or RECR 260; senior standing.
Management of parks and/or recreation operations and agencies. Legalities, policies, practices, procedures, principles, and theory related to planning, organizing, staffing, training, motivating, controlling, evaluating, financing, and managing resources in parks, recreation, and leisure services. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (008838)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
This course is directed fieldwork for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (008819)

Directed fieldwork experience with the Campus Wellness Center.

Certificate Selection Requirements: 6 units

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200, or faculty permission.
Resources and needs for outdoor recreation: managing people and natural resources to provide quality outdoor recreation experiences. Study of historic, social, political, economic, and environmental factors influencing natural resources recreation at federal, state, and local levels. Survey of conflicts in natural resource land use. Required field trip. 3 hours lecture. (008782)
Prerequisites: RECR 200; one course chosen from RECR 220, RECR 240, RECR 250, or RECR 260; successful completion of computer literacy requirement; or faculty permission.
Management approaches to budget and finance in recreation and park agencies and businesses; budget preparations, forecasting, accounting techniques, and capital acquisition. Review of revenue options, capital funding, and revenue sources included. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (008829)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of computer literacy requirement, or faculty permission.
Development of the ability to promote, publicize, mobilize, and coordinate private, commercial, and community recreation programs, services, resources, and activities to meet recreation needs. Development of public relations knowledge and skills necessary for managing a park and recreation agency, organization, or business. Covers working with print and electronic media. Special emphasis on market analysis, marketing, and promotion. Corporate Certification available from the American Hotel and Motel Association. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (008832)
Prerequisites: RECR 260.
Application of knowledge and skills in planning, implementing, and evaluating recreation programs for diverse populations. Course topics include volunteer management, marketing, public relations, funding, risk management, evaluation, and problem-solving. Requires out-of-class activity. Applicable to all human service fields. 3 hours lecture. (008835)

Certificate Electives: 9 units

9 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
Emphasis is on solving business problems through the strategic design of verbal, print, and electronic messages. Models for effective business documents, presentations, meetings, and interpersonal as well as electronic project interaction are applied to business communication problems. Related technology use, etiquette, cultural differences, and ethical considerations are highlighted. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (005687)
Provides a basic knowledge of legal fundamentals so as to inform students of their rights and duties for practical application in social and business life. Areas covered include employee rights, family law, renters and landlords, contracts, law and Small Business, home ownership, etc. Not open to Business Majors. 3 hours lecture. (001339)
Prerequisites: At least junior standing.
An in-depth study of federal and California employment laws as they affect the management of human resources, with appropriate consideration of ethical and global dimensions. Emphasis is on the legal rights and responsibilities of employers and employees in the employment relationship, primarily in a private-sector, non-union environment. 3 hours discussion. (001352)
This course is also offered as JOUR 101 .
This course teaches the concepts, history, and applications of communication. The implications and ethical issues of media and the communication process are covered. 3 hours lecture. (001636)
Using a combination of theory and application, this course focuses on the human side of organizations, including issues of 1) making good decisions, 2) enhancing performance, 3) steering through a turbulent global environment, 4) combining and unifying multiple business functions and 5) enabling change. Students gain an understanding of management and how and why organizations are structured. The themes of quality, technology, ethics, and adaptation are emphasized. 3 hours lecture. (005704)
Nature and functions of marketing systems and marketing in the individual firm. Study of the marketing mix, marketing institutions, and the environments in which marketing decisions are made. 3 hours lecture. (005872)
Prerequisites: MKTG 371.
Study of the unique characteristics of services and their implications for the development of effective marketing strategies, programs, and plans for service businesses, including professional services, not-for-profit services, and international services. 3 hours discussion. (005889)
Prerequisites: BIOL 104 or faculty permission for non-majors, basic computer literacy skills.
This course is an in-depth study of the physiology of exercise. Emphasis will be placed on energy metabolism during exercise and its relationship to the circulatory, pulmonary, and neuro-endocrine systems. Practical application will be stressed through discussions of clinical exercise physiology, exercise prescription, environmental exercise physiology, exercise and disease, special populations, biological adaptation, and the biology of peak performance. Concepts will be reinforced through laboratory exercises. 3 hours clinical, 2 hours activity. (006968)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200, or faculty permission.
Resources and needs for outdoor recreation: managing people and natural resources to provide quality outdoor recreation experiences. Study of historic, social, political, economic, and environmental factors influencing natural resources recreation at federal, state, and local levels. Survey of conflicts in natural resource land use. Required field trip. 3 hours lecture. (008782)
Prerequisites: RECR 200; concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 220, RECR 240, RECR 250, or RECR 260, or faculty permission.
Overview of the private sector of leisure services, including current trends in commercial recreation, employee recreation, the resort and hospitality industry, and recreation travel and tourism. The social, economic, and environmental significance of tourism and private sector recreation is examined. Selected recreation specialty businesses and tourism service providers are explored. 3 hours lecture. (008808)
This course is an independent study of special problems offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (008824)
Prerequisites: RECR 200; concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 220, RECR 240, RECR 250, or RECR 260; or faculty permission.
Introduction to the study of law applicable to the management of recreation resources in providing valuable recreational experiences for clientele of public and commercial recreation programs and facilities. Examines general legal principles, legal aspects of provision of services by the private sector, contracts and contracting for recreation and park services, legal authority and methods in resource-based recreation areas, and legal liability in parks, recreation, and athletic programs. 3 hours lecture. (008818)
Prerequisites: RECR 260.
Application of knowledge and skills in planning, implementing, and evaluating recreation programs for diverse populations. Course topics include volunteer management, marketing, public relations, funding, risk management, evaluation, and problem-solving. Requires out-of-class activity. Applicable to all human service fields. 3 hours lecture. (008835)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
This course is directed fieldwork for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (008819)
Prerequisites: RECR 200, RECR 420, RECR 422, one course chosen from RECR 220, RECR 240, RECR 250, or RECR 260; successful completion of computer literacy requirement, or faculty permission.
Management of private and commercial recreation programs, areas, and facilities. Considers planning, organizing, financing, staffing, operation, evaluation, facility use, and operational effectiveness and efficiency. Explores a broad range of private and commercial operations. 3 hours lecture. (008830)
This course examines the ways that social life contributes to human stress, and how stress impacts health and well-being. Students explore the ways that families, relationships, school, jobs, and social inequalities influence the effects of stress on our lives. Various coping and adaptation strategies are discussed. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (008973)
Catalog Cycle:12