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The Bachelor of Science in Recreation Administration

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Degree MAPs page in the University Catalog or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Literacy Requirement:

See Mathematics and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog. Writing proficiency in the major is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of a course in your major which has been designated as the Writing Proficiency (WP) course for the semester in which you take the course. Students who earn below a C- are required to repeat the course and earn a C- or higher to receive WP credit. See the Class Schedule for the designated WP courses for each semester. You must pass ENGL 130I or JOUR 130I (or equivalent) with a C- or higher before you may register for a WP course.

Application to the Major:

Departmental approval is required before you begin course work for this major. Application to the major can be made at the department office.

Course Requirements for the Major: 56-68 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree. Additional required courses, depending upon the selected option or advising pattern, are outlined following the major core program requirements.

Note: A maximum of 15 units of internship (courses numbered 189, 289, 389, 489, 589) may be applied to a bachelor's degree at CSU, Chico.

Since the Department of Recreation, Hospitality, and Parks Management uses a mentor-advisor system, it is important for you to request an advisor when you declare Recreation Administration as your major. In general, Recreation Administration majors are encouraged to take RECR 200 and complete the computer literacy requirement during the first semester in the department. Depending on the desired option, RECR 250 (for the Options in Resort and Lodging Management and Event Management) or RECR 240 (for the Options in Community/Commercial Recreation and Tourism and Parks and Natural Resource Management) or RECR 260 (for the Option in Recreation Therapy) should also be considered.

Major Core Program: 41 units

Computer Literacy

3 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course presents an overview of the Windows operating environment and a more in-depth look at Microsoft Word. In addition, Microsoft PowerPoint software is introduced. 1 hour discussion. Credit/no credit grading. (005811)

AND (Both the above and following course must be taken)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course covers the development of complex spreadsheets, including the preparation of charts and graphs, using Microsoft Excel. 1 hour discussion. Credit/no credit grading. (005812)

AND (Both the above and following course must be taken)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course uses Microsoft Access to teach the fundamentals of databases. Students learn how to create tables, queries, data entry forms, and user reports. 1 hour discussion. Credit/no credit grading. (005813)
Introduction to the computer for non-computer science students. History of the computer, hardware, software, and a variety of computer applications are considered. The social impact and future of computers for communication systems are discussed. An integrated software package for word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation is used. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002279)
Familiarization with the capabilities, limitations, and recreation management applications of computers. The basic operation, functions, and vocabulary of computers will be examined. Word processing, electronic spreadsheet, and database/file management software packages will be introduced. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (008780)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Pathway Foundation Quantitative Reasoning.
In this skills-based course, students learn the basics of computer hardware and software. They learn to use research and analytic tools needed to meet the demands of upper-division course work and to create professional presentations and Web content using electronic and conventional source materials in a safe and responsible manner. In addition to basic skills, through extensive use of the Internet this course puts the social world at the student's fingertips with the retrieval and analysis of survey data, exploration of the world using the latest in GIS technology, and participation in online collaborative communities appropriate to the social sciences. 3 hours seminar. (009054)

Recreation majors are strongly advised to develop computer literacy skills early in their course of study. Most community college computer literacy courses are transferable.

8 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
First professional preparation course for majors and minors. Prerequisite to all upper-division required recreation courses for majors and minors. Sociology and social psychology of leisure. History of leisure in Western cultures. Philosophical foundations of leisure studies. Introduction to the principal journals and professional literature. Ethics and foundations of professional practice. Introduction to the principal professional organizations. Career and course of study planning. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (008779)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200 or faculty permission.
Theory and process of program planning, construction, operation, and evaluation as applicable to a variety of agencies and communities. Exposure to several types of programs serving different age groups, interests, and needs within a range of environments. Recruitment, use, and supervision of volunteers. Exploration of program areas in depth: social, cultural, physical, mental, and special events. Consideration of practical application. 3 hours lecture. (008781)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200 or faculty permission.
A study of the characteristics and needs of diverse populations, specifically related to the delivery of inclusive leisure services. In-depth discussion of personal and societal attitudes, stereotypes, cultural competencies, legislation, accessibility, and program modification. Learning experiences include volunteer work, guest speakers, and wheelchair experience. This course is applicable to all disciplines dealing with diverse populations. 3 hours lecture. (008785)
Prerequisites: RECR 200; one course chosen from RECR 220, RECR 240, RECR 250, or RECR 260; successful completion of computer literacy requirement. Open to Recreation majors only.
Applications of science in recreation and parks management, including needs assessment and evaluation methods. Interpretation of research literature. Use of computers for data management and analysis. 3 hours lecture. (008817)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200, or faculty permission.
Study of the nature, scope, status, and historical development of professional leadership in recreation, parks, and special groups. Types, responsibilities, and criteria for positions. Professional preparation, certification, and licensing of personnel. Examination of professional body of knowledge, group dynamics, and theories of leadership. Competence, skills, and techniques of the supervisor and other professional personnel stressed. 3 hours lecture. (008822)
Prerequisites: RECR 200, concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of one course chosen from RECR 220, RECR 240, RECR 250, or RECR 260.
Comprehensive knowledge of managing customer service in recreation, park, hospitality, and tourism operations. Methods for identifying customer service expectations; developing a service culture within a recreation or hospitality organization; setting quality standards; developing policies, procedures, and systems to assure quality customer service; managing personnel for quality customer service; developing techniques to minimize customer service problems; resolving customer complaints; and measuring customer satisfaction. 3 hours lecture. Formerly RECR 471. (015805)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, successful completion of computer literacy requirement, RECR 200, RECR 301; one course chosen from RECR 220, RECR 240, RECR 250, or RECR 260; senior standing.
Management of parks and/or recreation operations and agencies. Legalities, policies, practices, procedures, principles, and theory related to planning, organizing, staffing, training, motivating, controlling, evaluating, financing, and managing resources in parks, recreation, and leisure services. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (008838)
Prerequisites: RECR 200; one course chosen from RECR 220, RECR 240, RECR 250, or RECR 260; successful completion of computer literacy requirement; or faculty permission.
Management approaches to budget and finance in recreation and park agencies and businesses; budget preparations, forecasting, accounting techniques, and capital acquisition. Review of revenue options, capital funding, and revenue sources included. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (008829)

14 units selected from:

one of the following two plans:

Plan I - Internship Program

3 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Senior standing, faculty permission.
Preparation for internship field assignment in ensuing semester: resume and job inquiry letter writing, community and agency traditions, mores, environments and expectations, interview methods, problem-solving, human relations, attitudes, communication skills, positive learning and contributing. Leads to and requires securing of an internship to complete course requirements. 1 hour lecture. (008849)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in RECR 589, faculty permission.
Pre-assignment preparation for internship experience and post-assignment analysis of the 14 weeks of full-time experience in a recreation, parks, hospitality, therapeutic, or special group operation, business, or agency. 1 hour seminar. Credit/no credit grading. (008864)
Prerequisites: Graduating senior standing, completion of other course requirements, RECR 584, 700 hours of approved field experience, concurrent enrollment in RECR 586, cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher, faculty permission.
Supervised off-campus, full-time practical work or leadership experience, including application of curricular knowledge and skills, study of agency applications and resources, and public and/or private service offerings. Internship field placement must be approved by faculty advisor. 36 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (008866)

Plan II - Merit Internship Program

Students whose GPA in overall course work is 3.0 or above may elect to enter the Merit Internship Program. Formal application for this program must occur by the second semester of the junior year.

3 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Senior standing, cumulative overall GPA of 3.0 or higher, faculty permission.
Preparation for merit internship field assignment in international area in ensuing semester: resume and job inquiry letter writing, community and agency environments, traditions, mores and expectations, interview methods, problem-solving, human relations, attitudes and communication skills, positive learning and contributing. Leads to and requires the securing of an internship to complete the course requirements. 1 hour lecture. (008863)
Prerequisites: Cumulative overall GPA of 3.0 or higher, faculty permission.
Corequisites: RECR 589M.
Pre-assignment preparation for merit internship experience and post-assignment analysis of the 14 weeks of full-time experience in a recreation, parks, hospitality, therapeutic, or special group operation, business, or agency. 1 hour seminar. Credit/no credit grading. (008865)
Prerequisites: Graduating senior standing, GPA of 3.0 or higher in overall course work, completion of other course requirements, RECR 585, 1000 hours of approved field experience, concurrent enrollment in RECR 587, faculty permission.
Supervised off-campus, full-time practical work or leadership experience, including application of curricular knowledge and skills, study of agency applications and resources and public and/or private service offerings. Internship field placement must be approved by faculty advisor. 36 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (008867)

Major Option Course Requirements: 15-27 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required dependent upon the option chosen. Students must select one of the following options for completion of the major course requirements.

The Option in Community and Commercial Recreation and Tourism: 17-18 units

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200, or faculty permission.
Resources and needs for outdoor recreation: managing people and natural resources to provide quality outdoor recreation experiences. Study of historic, social, political, economic, and environmental factors influencing natural resources recreation at federal, state, and local levels. Survey of conflicts in natural resource land use. Required field trip. 3 hours lecture. (008782)
Prerequisites: RECR 200; concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 220, RECR 240, RECR 250, or RECR 260, or faculty permission.
Overview of the private sector of leisure services, including current trends in commercial recreation, employee recreation, the resort and hospitality industry, and recreation travel and tourism. The social, economic, and environmental significance of tourism and private sector recreation is examined. Selected recreation specialty businesses and tourism service providers are explored. 3 hours lecture. (008808)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of computer literacy requirement, or faculty permission.
Development of the ability to promote, publicize, mobilize, and coordinate private, commercial, and community recreation programs, services, resources, and activities to meet recreation needs. Development of public relations knowledge and skills necessary for managing a park and recreation agency, organization, or business. Covers working with print and electronic media. Special emphasis on market analysis, marketing, and promotion. Corporate Certification available from the American Hotel and Motel Association. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (008832)
Prerequisites: RECR 260.
Application of knowledge and skills in planning, implementing, and evaluating recreation programs for diverse populations. Course topics include volunteer management, marketing, public relations, funding, risk management, evaluation, and problem-solving. Requires out-of-class activity. Applicable to all human service fields. 3 hours lecture. (008835)
Prerequisites: RECR 200, RECR 420, RECR 422, one course chosen from RECR 220, RECR 240, RECR 250, or RECR 260; successful completion of computer literacy requirement, or faculty permission.
Management of private and commercial recreation programs, areas, and facilities. Considers planning, organizing, financing, staffing, operation, evaluation, facility use, and operational effectiveness and efficiency. Explores a broad range of private and commercial operations. 3 hours lecture. (008830)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course examines the cultural diversity of tourism as a global phenomenon, focusing on non-Western cultures and the impact of culture change in the 21st century. The development of tourism as a global industry is discussed as well as an analysis of types of tourists and motivation for travel to various destinations, such as cultural heritage tourism and ecotourism. Case studies illustrate the positive and negative impacts of tourism. 3 hours lecture. (000516)
Nature and functions of marketing systems and marketing in the individual firm. Study of the marketing mix, marketing institutions, and the environments in which marketing decisions are made. 3 hours lecture. (005872)
Prerequisites: MKTG 305.
Study of the decision processes of individuals and groups toward consumer products and the implications to marketers. Emphasis on both individual, group, and external determinants of consumer attitudes and behavior. 3 hours discussion. (005873)
Prerequisites: MKTG 371.
Study of the unique characteristics of services and their implications for the development of effective marketing strategies, programs, and plans for service businesses, including professional services, not-for-profit services, and international services. 3 hours discussion. (005889)
This course provides students with the opportunity to become involved in service to recreation and leisure agencies and organizations. Integrated learning is coupled with service in a collaborative relationship with a variety of civic and regional service agencies and organizations. Students are involved in planning, implementing, and evaluating selected service learning projects. 2 hours discussion. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (008821)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200, or faculty permission.
Methods and skills to effectively provide recreation services for elders in a variety of settings; current issues and problems involved in providing leisure and recreation services for the elders; examination of the value of recreation activities in the lives of elders with regard to relatives and friends as well as oneself; resources for providing leisure programs and pre-retirement planning. Requires out-of-class activity with senior programs. Helpful to all disciplines working with senior citizens. 3 hours lecture. (004440)
Prerequisites: RECR 200; concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 220, RECR 240, RECR 250, or RECR 260; or faculty permission.
Introduction to the study of law applicable to the management of recreation resources in providing valuable recreational experiences for clientele of public and commercial recreation programs and facilities. Examines general legal principles, legal aspects of provision of services by the private sector, contracts and contracting for recreation and park services, legal authority and methods in resource-based recreation areas, and legal liability in parks, recreation, and athletic programs. 3 hours lecture. (008818)
Prerequisites: RECR 200, concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of one course chosen from RECR 220, RECR 240, RECR 250, or RECR 260.
Exploration of the role and scope of professional associations and affinity organizations. Topics include mission and values, organizational structures, board governance, typical association divisions, member services, and employment opportunities. Students gain experience in special event planning and the development of member benefits. Partnerships with campus or area organizations provide opportunities to apply the class material. 3 hours lecture. (015806)

The Option in Parks and Natural Resources Management: 25-27 units

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200, or faculty permission.
Resources and needs for outdoor recreation: managing people and natural resources to provide quality outdoor recreation experiences. Study of historic, social, political, economic, and environmental factors influencing natural resources recreation at federal, state, and local levels. Survey of conflicts in natural resource land use. Required field trip. 3 hours lecture. (008782)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200, or faculty permission.
Purpose, types, organization for scheduling, budget, recruitment, training, supervision, appraisal, tasks, tools, equipment, vegetation, OSHA, safety, and methods of maintenance. Design to minimize maintenance and vandalism. Review of special facilities: pools, golf courses, ball fields, camps, lakes, marinas, ski areas, state and federal recreation areas, etc. Field visits required. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (008804)
Prerequisites: RECR 200, concurrent enrollment in or completion of RECR 240 and RECR 300, or faculty permission.
Theoretical and applied concepts of citizen involvement in policy and management decisions for both public and private sectors of recreation resource management. Discussion of legal mandates, agency/organization credibility, applied methods for obtaining citizen input, and case studies. 3 hours lecture. (008839)
Prerequisites: Upper-division standing, a basic oral communication course such as CMST 131, or faculty permission.
Theory and application of environmental interpretation services to visitors in natural and cultural resource settings. Communication of environmental information to general public via audio-visual presentations, conducted trips, exhibits, nature trails, publications, and visitor centers. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (008840)
Prerequisites: RECR 200, RECR 240, RECR 300, RECR 440, successful completion of computer literacy requirement, or faculty permission.
Managing the interactions between natural resources and users to produce outdoor recreation. The outdoor recreation production function. Carrying capacity, limits of acceptable change, competition, and complementarity among recreation uses and between recreation uses and other resource uses. Methods for monitoring recreational impacts, and approaches to managing resource quality and recreational opportunities. Required field trip. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (008843)

3 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Application of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in agriculture and natural resource management. Identification and delineation of locations and areas; collection, analysis, storage, and retrieval of site and time specific data for agriculture and natural resource management and monitoring. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000168)
Prerequisites: PSSC 101 or PSSC 250 or faculty permission.
Design, management, and evaluation of landscape and agricultural irrigation systems for efficient water use. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000170)
Offers practical training in collections management techniques, including registration methods, curatorial practices, and the care, preservation, and conservation of museum specimens. 6 hours activity. (000596)
This course introduces students to all stages of the exhibit planning process, from the initial concept to the final product. Students are introduced to the methodologies and approaches of current museum practices, including industry standards in design and implementation, the importance of visitor studies, and the underlying educational foundation for developing interpretive museum exhibits. 6 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (000619)
This course focuses on the creation of an actual museum exhibit for the annual spring Museum of Anthropology student-created exhibition. Students are required to undertake all phases of the research and design process and final installation. 6 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (000621)
APCG 110 provides an introduction to computer graphics and art. Students use the computer as a tool for creating static and animated images. Basic instruction in design and color relationships is provided. The writing component may include research reports from current graphics publications and/or attendance and discussion of art exhibitions. 1 hour discussion, 4 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (002287)
This is a foundation computer course for studio artists. The course covers basic instruction using the computer for painting, drawing, image processing, photographic composites, words as art, animation, research, and presentation. Emphasis is on conceptual and creative processes. Art and design principles, aesthetic decision making, and visual effectiveness are addressed. Basic drawing skills strongly recommended. 6 hours activity. (000737)
Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.
An examination of ecological principles and the impact of increasing population and technology upon the environment. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (001156)
Prerequisite: NSCI 102.
Plant and animal morphology, classification, and ecological relationships examined through field and laboratory study. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (001158)
This course is an introduction to the fundamental vocabulary and techniques of digital photography. Emphasis is placed on developing visual competence in the creation and consumption of lens-based imagery. Course content includes the basics of camera and digital production techniques for color and black and white photographs that are produced as exhibition-quality prints and on-screen imagery. Includes a broad-based survey of photo history, contemporary theory, and current issues related to the practice of photography. Open to non-majors. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001654)
An introduction to computer graphics utilizing both PC and Macintosh platforms. Applications for print, video, and training are stressed. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (001665)
Prerequisites: BIOL 342 or GEOS 130 or equivalent.
This course is also offered as RECR 448 .
Experiential-oriented survey of methods and materials for teaching environmental concepts in schools, communities, nature centers, camps, and parks. Exposure to history, theory, philosophy, and goals of environmental education programs. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002778)
Prerequisites: GEOG 219 or equivalent.
This course provides an introduction to topics in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course will combine a conceptual discussion of topics with practical exercises using microcomputer software. Both the theory and practice of GIS analysis will be presented. 3 hours lecture. (003883)
Prerequisites: GEOG 320 or equivalent.
Study of the legal antecedents to California environmental impact legislation; analysis of environmental review procedures, environmental research, preparation and evaluation of EIRs, and conditional negative declarations. 3 hours discussion. (003949)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130.
Techniques of information gathering and writing for various audiences in the mass media. Required course for the Options in News-Editorial and Public Relations. Students must earn a grade of C or higher to advance to subsequent writing courses in the Department of Journalism. Students who do not receive at least a C may repeat the course. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (004838)
Prerequisites: KINE 123 or KINE 124 recommended.
This course is for outdoor education and recreation leaders and is an introduction to the skills and safety systems associated with beginning rock climbing (e.g., top rope climbing, rappelling, bouldering) and the management of rock climbing in outdoor programs. Additionally, teaching methods appropriate for rock climbing are discussed, demonstrated, and evaluated. This course requires additional field time taught on weekends. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory. Special fee required; see the Class Schedule. (006686)
Prerequisites: KINE 121 recommended but not required.
Introduction to basic summer backpacking skills, including equipment, nutrition, fitness, minimum impact camping, safety, beginning map and compass skills, leadership issues, and environmental ethics. Emphasis on technical applications and the implementation of these skills in adventure programs. Successful completion of this course meets the requirements for two national certifications: 1) The Wilderness Education Association's Wilderness Steward Certification; 2) Leave No Trace Trainer Certification. This course requires a ten-day field session taught over Thanksgiving break. 2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory. Special fee required; see the Class Schedule. (006700)
Prerequisites: KINE 226 or equivalent.
Introduction to winter wilderness living skills including nutrition, minimum impact camping, snow physics, avalanche, safety, medical issues, back country skiing techniques, snow shelters, leadership issues, and environmental ethics. Emphasis is on technical applications and the implementations of these skills in adventure programs. Successful completion of this class earns the student an American Institute of Avalanche Research and Education Level I certification. This is a physically demanding course requiring 10 continuous days of camping in winter conditions. It is not for the novice. 1 hour lecture, 9 hours laboratory. (006685)
Prerequisites: KINE 226 (may be taken concurrently).
This course gives students an introduction to whitewater canoeing and kayaking skills. Students gain an understanding of the equipment, techniques, and procedures to conduct canoeing and kayaking activities in flat water, moving water, and whitewater environments. Emphasis is on the development of individual paddling skills, safe and conscientious paddling, and group management while on moving water. This course requires additional field time taught on weekends. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory. Special fee required; see the Class Schedule. (006707)
This course provides the historical and philosophical foundations for using the outdoors as a medium for learning. Basic teaching and leadership styles used in instruction are emphasized, including a detailed look at the ethics involved in using the outdoors and adventure programming in education. 3 hours lecture. (007019)
Prerequisites: KINE 222 recommended.
This course focuses on the process of facilitation. Specific attention is paid to transfer of learning, outdoor education process/theory, use of metaphors, small group development, debriefing/processing, providing appropriate feedback, therapeutic approaches, framing experiences, and the various theories involved in the use of adventure experiences as a medium for education/therapy. Applications are generalized to specific populations (e.g., youth at risk, chemical dependency, businesses, university orientation programs, and public schools). This class focuses on advanced methods of facilitation and processing. 3 hours lecture. (007021)
This course is also offered as POLS 332 .
An investigation of contemporary moral issues involved in police work and corrections, such as deadly force, entrapment, undercover work, corruption, and prisoners' rights. 3 hours seminar. (007269)
The history and philosophy of criminal justice in America; recapitulation of the system; identifying the various sub-systems, role expectations, and their interrelationships; theories of crime, punishment, and rehabilitation; ethics, education, and training for professionalism in the criminal justice system. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (001563)
Prerequisites: POLS 250 or faculty permission.
Examines current and developing programs and issues in the field of criminal justice. 3 hours seminar. (001603)
Plant structure, growth, reproduction, and responses to the environment. How humans modify plants and the environment to grow crops. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (007765)
Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or CHEM 111.
Soil biology, fertility, chemistry, physical properties, taxonomy and their applications to agricultural management and environmental enhancement. Relationships of soils to the world food supply and population. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007776)
A survey of North American rangeland resources and the principles of their use and management, including basic plant-animal-soil relationships and multiple uses. 3 hours lecture. (007775)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of computer literacy requirement, or faculty permission.
Development of the ability to promote, publicize, mobilize, and coordinate private, commercial, and community recreation programs, services, resources, and activities to meet recreation needs. Development of public relations knowledge and skills necessary for managing a park and recreation agency, organization, or business. Covers working with print and electronic media. Special emphasis on market analysis, marketing, and promotion. Corporate Certification available from the American Hotel and Motel Association. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (008832)
Prerequisites: RECR 200; concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 220, RECR 240, RECR 250, or RECR 260; or faculty permission.
Introduction to the study of law applicable to the management of recreation resources in providing valuable recreational experiences for clientele of public and commercial recreation programs and facilities. Examines general legal principles, legal aspects of provision of services by the private sector, contracts and contracting for recreation and park services, legal authority and methods in resource-based recreation areas, and legal liability in parks, recreation, and athletic programs. 3 hours lecture. (008818)
Prerequisites: BIOL 342 or GEOS 130 or equivalent.
This course is also offered as EDCI 448 .
Experiential-oriented survey of methods and materials for teaching environmental concepts in schools, communities, nature centers, camps, and parks. Exposure to history, theory, philosophy, and goals of environmental education programs. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002778)

Students are encouraged to select courses with the approval of an advisor. Also, with an advisor's approval, additional courses not listed above may be used to meet the elective requirement above.

An approved minor or certificate may be substituted for the 9 units (3 courses) listed above. Approved minors/certificates include biological sciences, communication design, communication studies, criminal justice, environmental studies, geography, geology, instructional design, journalism, museum studies (certificate), and outdoor education (certificate). Other minors may also be acceptable with advisor's approval.

The Option in Resort and Lodging Management: 15 units

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Prior completion of or concurrent enrollment in RECR 200 or faculty permission.
This course provides an in-depth analysis of the role of service departments within a hospitality setting. The course also reviews the latest industry issues and trends affecting all aspects and segments of the hospitality industry including full-service hotels, bed and breakfast, spas, and cruise lines. 3 hours lecture. (008783)
Prerequisites: RECR 200, RECR 250.
Organization, administration, and management of food service in the Food Service/Hospitality industry. 3 hours lecture. (008805)
Prerequisites: RECR 200, RECR 250, successful completion of computer literacy requirement, or faculty permission.
The organization, duties, and administration of hotel front office. Examines the various jobs in the lodging front office, and procedures for registering, accounting for, and checking out of guests. Additional focus is on the organization, duties, and administration of hotel reservations, night audit, service quality, pricing and inventory management, and uniformed services departments. Emphasis is placed on the operations, coordination, and communication within and between departments. 3 hours lecture. (008806)
Prerequisites: RECR 200, RECR 250, RECR 354, computer literacy.
Focused on the application of critical thinking, demonstration of leadership principles, interaction with industry professionals, and development of an awareness of societal and ethical issues and their application to the hospitality and tourism industries. Components of guest satisfaction and guest loyalty programs are explored. 3 hours lecture. (008848)
Prerequisites: RECR 200, RECR 250, RECR 354, RECR 452, computer literacy.
A study of current service management systems as it applies to the hospitality profession. Evaluation of operating standards essential to the profitability of lodging and accommodation enterprises. 3 hours lecture. (008853)

The Option in Recreation Therapy: 26 units

The Recreation Therapy Option is designed to prepare students to work as allied health professionals with people who have special needs in clinical, residential, and community-based agencies. Students studying in this option will meet the standards developed by the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification (NCTRC) and the California Board of Recreation and Park Certification (CBRPC). Successfully completing this curriculum will provide students with knowledge competencies necessary to qualify for both the National and State Therapeutic Recreation Certification Exams.

8 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Study of the structure of the human body, to include muscles, bones, heart, brain, ear, eye, and other systems, as well as a short look at development of the fetus. Lab work entails dissection of the cat and study of the human skeleton. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001110)
Basic functioning of the organ systems of the human body, including the brain and nervous system; vision and hearing; heart and circulation; blood and immunity; respiration, digestion and metabolism; muscles; excretory, endocrine, and reproductive systems. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001114)
Introduction to the study, definition, and classification of deviant behavior, including experimental psychopathology, psychodiagnostic methods, and psychotherapeutic procedures. 3 hours lecture. (007939)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200, or faculty permission.
Methods and skills to effectively provide recreation services for elders in a variety of settings; current issues and problems involved in providing leisure and recreation services for the elders; examination of the value of recreation activities in the lives of elders with regard to relatives and friends as well as oneself; resources for providing leisure programs and pre-retirement planning. Requires out-of-class activity with senior programs. Helpful to all disciplines working with senior citizens. 3 hours lecture. (004440)
Prerequisites: RECR 200, RECR 260, successful completion of computer literacy requirement, or faculty permission.
An in-depth exploration of special populations, including individuals with disabilities and diseases. Content focuses on etiology, prognosis, symptomatic conditions, and recreation therapy prescription. Medical terminology and pharmacology as it relates to recreation therapy are discussed. Appropriate for allied health professionals. 3 hours lecture. (008854)
Prerequisites: RECR 260.
Application of knowledge and skills in planning, implementing, and evaluating recreation programs for diverse populations. Course topics include volunteer management, marketing, public relations, funding, risk management, evaluation, and problem-solving. Requires out-of-class activity. Applicable to all human service fields. 3 hours lecture. (008835)
Prerequisites: RECR 260 or faculty permission.
Study and practical application of individual and group leisure counseling techniques (students will counsel their peers). Other topics include communication skills, leisure assessments, leisure resources, leisure education activities, and applications of leisure counseling for special populations. Applicable for all leisure service professionals and human service disciplines. 3 hours lecture. (008856)
Corequisites: SWRK 200 for majors only.
Using a systems framework and selected human behavior theories across the lifespan, the biological, social, psychological, and cultural influences on individuals, families, and groups are investigated. Particular emphasis is given to ethnic and cultural diversity and promoting student self-reflection across generations and cultural competence. 3 hours lecture. (009416)

The Option in Event Management: 15 units

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Prior completion of or concurrent enrollment in RECR 200 or faculty permission.
This course provides an in-depth analysis of the role of service departments within a hospitality setting. The course also reviews the latest industry issues and trends affecting all aspects and segments of the hospitality industry including full-service hotels, bed and breakfast, spas, and cruise lines. 3 hours lecture. (008783)
Prerequisites: RECR 200, RECR 220, or faculty permission.
This is an introduction to the fundamentals of event management. Topics include main categories of events professionalism, economic impact of the event industry, event planning, coordination, marketing, research, evaluation, revenue generation, sponsorship, programming, volunteer management, risk management, site planning, sustainable management, technology, operations, and logistics. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (008801)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of computer literacy requirement, or faculty permission.
Development of the ability to promote, publicize, mobilize, and coordinate private, commercial, and community recreation programs, services, resources, and activities to meet recreation needs. Development of public relations knowledge and skills necessary for managing a park and recreation agency, organization, or business. Covers working with print and electronic media. Special emphasis on market analysis, marketing, and promotion. Corporate Certification available from the American Hotel and Motel Association. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (008832)
Prerequisites: RECR 200, RECR 270, successful completion of computer literacy requirement, or faculty permission.
This course provides an overview of the meeting, conference, and event planning industry, including suppliers and affiliates. It is designed to provide students with basic information and experience about the development and implementation of a meeting or conference. Experiential and theoretical information about planning and design, budgeting, and financial management systems, measurement and evaluation and risk and liability will be presented. 3 hours lecture. (008810)
Prerequisites: RECR 200, RECR 220, RECR 323.
This is an event management capstone course designed for students to further explore the profession of event management and to learn how to plan, implement, and evaluate special events in a dynamic experiential/service-learning environment. This means that students have invaluable opportunities to practice foundational concepts and skills of event management through meaningful involvement in community events. The course offers students hands-on experience of event planning, coordination, fundraising, sponsorship, programming, marketing, communications, vendor management, volunteer management, risk management, event research, and event evaluation. 3 hours lecture. (021262)

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Catalog Cycle:12