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The Bachelor of Arts in Economics

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Degree MAPs page in the University Catalog or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Literacy Requirement:

See Mathematics and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog. Writing proficiency in the major is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of a course in your major which has been designated as the Writing Proficiency (WP) course for the semester in which you take the course. Students who earn below a C- are required to repeat the course and earn a C- or higher to receive WP credit. See the Class Schedule for the designated WP courses for each semester. You must pass ENGL 130I or JOUR 130I (or equivalent) with a C- or higher before you may register for a WP course.

Course Requirements for the Major: 42-57 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree.

In addition to completing the degree core courses, all majors must choose an Option in Economics, Environmental Economics, or International Economics to fulfill degree requirements.

Major Core Courses: 24-25 units

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An introductory survey of macroeconomic analysis. Use of fundamental economic concepts to analyze the over-all economy. Determination of gross national product, rates of unemployment, problems of inflation, recession, and the use of governmental policies. Discussion of current problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002636)
An introductory survey of microeconomic analysis. Analysis of individual economic units: household, firms, and markets. Analysis of individual decision making. Supply and demand analysis. Type of market organization: competition, oligopoly, and monopoly. Discussion of current problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002638)
Prerequisites: ECON 103.
Microeconomics examines the economic behavior of individual decision-making agents, such as consumers, resource owners, and firms. The goal of this course is to build a theoretical foundation to study various applied fields in economics and management (such as international trade, public finance, labor, or environmental economics). Topics include consumer theory, production and cost analysis, theories of the firm and markets, and welfare economics. 3 hours discussion. (002647)
Prerequisites: ECON 102.
An extension of macroeconomic concepts and principles relating to short-term stabilization policies, long-term growth questions, fiscal and monetary theory and policy, international dimensions, and problems of inflation, deflation, unemployment, productivity, and growth. Theories and models are used to examine, develop, and analyze macroeconomics issues, problems, and policies. 3 hours discussion. (002648)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, ECON 102, ECON 103, ECON 301, ECON 302, and senior status.
Students review selected economic literature and complete written assignments that relate readings to their area of interest in economics. Class meetings provide opportunities for constructive critiques from the instructor, feedback from other students, in-class writing, and oral presentations. The course is also used for program assessment. Honors in the Major students can substitute ECON 499H for ECON 495. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (002704)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Programming for students not majoring in Computer Science or Engineering. This course introduces students to programming using an integrated graphical development environment. Event-driven, visual, and object-oriented programming concepts are presented. Projects include common business problems that require data entry, display of calculated results, report requests, conditional testing, arithmetic operations, array processing, data validation, searching, sorting, reading and writing to files, and database applications. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (002298)
This course introduces students to the concept of information systems as the application of technical resources to support organizational processes. Given this foundation, students build an integrative, process-oriented understanding of information systems and their deployment, management, and use within distributed and global organizations. Projects focus on introductory enterprise systems, fundamentals of database systems, and basic Web programming. For this course, students are expected to have demonstrated proficiency in the use of microcomputers and office automation software including word processing, spreadsheets, and desktop databases. A proficiency exam is given during the first week of each semester and students are encouraged to take this exam in advance of the semester they intend to enroll in the class. Students who lack such knowledge may wish to enroll in appropriate undergraduate courses prior to attempting this course. This course is designed for BADM majors. 3 hours lecture. (005770)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Pathway Foundation Quantitative Reasoning.
In this skills-based course, students learn the basics of computer hardware and software. They learn to use research and analytic tools needed to meet the demands of upper-division course work and to create professional presentations and Web content using electronic and conventional source materials in a safe and responsible manner. In addition to basic skills, through extensive use of the Internet this course puts the social world at the student's fingertips with the retrieval and analysis of survey data, exploration of the world using the latest in GIS technology, and participation in online collaborative communities appropriate to the social sciences. 3 hours seminar. (009054)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Completion of ELM requirement; MATH 118, MATH 119 (or High School equivalents).
This course covers the fundamental concepts and techniques of differential and integral calculus with an introduction to differential equations. Emphasis on applications from the Life Sciences. This course is not intended for majors in mathematics, physics, chemistry, or engineering. No credit for students with credit in MATH 120. A grade of C- or higher is required for GE credit. 4 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (005512)
Prerequisites: Completion of ELM requirement; both MATH 118 and MATH 119 (or high school equivalent); a score that meets department guidelines on a department administered calculus readiness exam.
Limits and continuity. The derivative and applications to related rates, maxma and minima, and curve sketching. Transcendental functions. An introduction to the definite integral and area. A grade of C- or higher is required for GE credit. 4 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (005506)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

Any upper-division ECON course that is not taken to satisfy any other requirement for the economics major.

Note: For students interested in graduate school, MATH 121 is strongly recommended, as are MATH 350, MATH 351, and MATH 435.

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: For Business Administration majors: MATH 107.
For others: Completion of General Education Breadth Area A4 requirement. Descriptive statistics, sampling theory, statistical inference and tests of hypotheses, analysis of variance, chi-square tests, simple regression and correlation, and multiple regression and correlation. BADM 103 and MATH 108 are equivalent courses and each may be substituted for the other. 3 hours discussion. (015718)
Prerequisites: ECON 102, ECON 103.
The objective of this course is to show the relevance of statistic analysis for economics. Each topic is presented with an application of a macroeconomic or microeconomic theory. Real data is used in software applications for developing a conceptual understanding of the problem and for analyzing the data. 3 hours discussion. (002675)

Major Option Course Requirements: 18-32 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required dependent upon the option chosen. Students must select one of the following options for completion of the major course requirements.  Use the links below to jump to your chosen option.



The Option in Economics: 18 units

The BA in Economics with an Option Economics is designed for those seeking a structured program in economics and flexibility in selecting a set of 300- and 400-level economics courses to complete the major. Those declaring this option complete the core courses listed above and additional courses in economics.

9 units required:

Any 300-400 level elective Economics (ECON) courses. Some limitations exist regarding specific courses that can be applied toward the economics major. See catalog course descriptions. A maximum of 3 units of internship (ECON 389) credit may be applied to the economics major.

9 units required:

Any 400-level Economics (ECON) courses with the prerequisite of ECON 301 and/or ECON 302.

The Option in Environmental Economics: 30-32 units

The BA in Economics with an Option in Environmental Economics is designed for those seeking a structured program in economics with an emphasis in environmental economics. Those declaring this option complete the core courses listed above, additional courses in economics (see below), and selected courses outside the Department of Economics.

Economics Courses: 12 units

3 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An analysis of the costs and benefits of environmental preservation. Systems for creating economic incentives for pollution abatement. Criteria for establishing optimum pollution abatement, including efficiency, safety, and sustainability standards. Impacts of population growth on global environmental problems. Alternative energy use patterns and their impact on energy markets and global environmental health. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002671)
Prerequisites: ECON 301.
An analysis of petroleum markets and the likely trend in prices. Alternatives to petroleum and increasing dependence on OPEC, including conservation technologies, efficiency improvements in conventional energy production, and the potential for expanded use of renewable energy resources. Public utility deregulation and the impact on the efficient use of energy. 3 hours seminar. (002695)
Prerequisite: ECON 301.
Economic theory and policy concerning optimization of resource use and pollution abatement. Incentive systems for generating optimum pollution abatement. Efficiency, safety, and sustainability standards as criteria defining the appropriate level of environmental preservation. Economically efficient rates of consumption for renewable and non-renewable resources. Case studies in resource exploitation assessing whether current use rates deviate from the optimum. 3 hours lecture. (002696)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ECON 103.
An overview of the economics of government regulation with emphasis on the formulation of regulatory policy, alternative methods of regulation, and the economic impacts of such policy. Topics may include environmental regulation, energy conservation policy, consumer protection, antitrust policy, and a critical evaluation of market-based regulatory policy. 3 hours lecture. (002668)
Prerequisites: ECON 301.
Theory of location of economic activities. Land use. Systems of cities and regions. Regional structure and growth. Spatial aspects of urban areas and urban problems. 3 hours seminar. (002694)

Note: ECON 355 and ECON 462 appear on two selection lists for the Option in Environmental Economics. Whichever course is not selected from the above choice may be taken to fulfill requirements for the second listing where it appears. Neither course may be used to fulfill the requirement in both selection lists where it appears.

Environmental Economics Electives: 18-20 units

2 courses selected from:

Select one course from two different subjects.

Biology:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Designed specifically for non-majors. Emphasis on broad biological principles, as illustrated by plants, and the economic importance and role of plants in human ecology. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001119)
Prerequisites: Recommend CHEM 111 or concurrent enrollment.
Introduction to biological molecules, bioenergetics, cellular structure and function, elements of molecular biology and genetics, and mechanisms of macroevolution and systematics. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001122)
Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.
An examination of ecological principles and the impact of increasing population and technology upon the environment. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (001156)
Prerequisite: NSCI 102.
Plant and animal morphology, classification, and ecological relationships examined through field and laboratory study. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (001158)

Chemistry:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Designed for non-science majors, this course will examine contemporary science issues and use this context to provide an understanding of the basic chemical processes that govern our lives. Students will learn how scientists study chemical processes, decipher them, and develop them to meet our needs. The importance of the relationship between science and technology and the public's understanding of these issues will also be explored. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001819)
Prerequisites: Completion of ELM requirement, Intermediate Algebra.
A survey of the principles of chemistry, primarily for students in agriculture, industry and technology, and pre-nursing. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001826)
Prerequisites: Second-year high school algebra; one year high school chemistry. (One year of high school physics and one year of high school mathematics past Algebra II are recommended.)
Principles of chemistry for students in science, medical, and related professions. Atomic structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, periodic table, gases, solids, liquids, solutions, and equilibrium. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001816)

Geoscience:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: One course from GE Pathway Foundation Physical Sciences and one course from GE Pathway Foundation Life Sciences.
Human impact on life-support systems; use of physical and ecological principles in environmental management and protection; discussion of land use and its environmental impact; and an evaluation of human influence on natural cycles. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education Capstone course. (021331)
Prerequisites: One course from GE Pathway Foundation Physical Sciences and one course from GE Pathway Foundation Life Sciences.
Provides the non-major with a geologic approach to current environmental problems relating to the origin and use of energy, mineral, and water resources, and the causes and mitigations of geologic hazards. 3 hours discussion. (004071)
Prerequisites: One course from GE Pathway Foundation Physical Sciences.
Analysis of present and long-term global energy crises; coverage of scientific concepts needed to understand energy and its environmental interactions; in-depth examination of alternative energy sources and their environmental impact. 3 hours lecture. (004149)
An integrated study of the nature and interactions of living things and their environments. This course is an introduction to the processes of evolution and speciation, ecology and ecosystem processes, cellular biology and organismal physiology. The course is primarily for students without a strong background in high school biology or chemistry. The course includes online content delivery, in-class discussion, and a hands-on activity session. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (020372)
Prerequisites: NSCI 141, NSCI 142, or faculty permission.
Fundamental concepts in (1) the solar system and the universe, (2) the structure and composition of the solid Earth, and (3) Earth's atmosphere and water. Intended for Liberal Studies majors and students pursuing a single subject teaching credential in science. 1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity. (004144)

4 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
The role of agricultural business in the economy. Introductory economic and business principles and their application to the solution of agricultural problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (000014)
Prerequisites: ABUS 101 or faculty permission.
The economics of renewable natural resource use, management, development, and allocation. Conflicts in use, markets for resources, cases of market failure, and economic conservation will be discussed. 3 hours lecture. (015981)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; BIOL 152 or faculty permission.
Some taxonomic background is recommended. Interrelationships among living organisms, field observations of such phenomena. Application of quantitative and qualitative methods to the interpretation of ecological phenomena. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (001206)
Prerequisites: ECON 103.
An overview of the economics of government regulation with emphasis on the formulation of regulatory policy, alternative methods of regulation, and the economic impacts of such policy. Topics may include environmental regulation, energy conservation policy, consumer protection, antitrust policy, and a critical evaluation of market-based regulatory policy. 3 hours lecture. (002668)
This course is an internship offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Field experience in working with economic data designed to complement the theoretical classroom curriculum and to give students work experience related to their studies. Placements are limited, so students must be screened. Units are dependent upon the number of hours in the field. May be repeated up to a maximum of 15 units. No more than 3 units can be counted toward 300-level Economics major requirement. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. (002677)

Note: ECON 389 must be taken for 3 units and may be counted only once for this requirement.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ECON 301.
Theory of location of economic activities. Land use. Systems of cities and regions. Regional structure and growth. Spatial aspects of urban areas and urban problems. 3 hours seminar. (002694)
Geographic analysis of humanity's interaction with the environment. Examines natural and human systems, resources, population, energy, and pollution. Develops an appreciation of the beauty, balance, and complexity of natural systems and human success in attaining harmony with them. Enhances awareness and perception of each individual's role in and with the environment. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (003873)
Study of the theory and practice of planning. Analysis of planning processes, elements of the comprehensive plan, zoning, environmental impact of development, regional policies, and growth. Includes investigation of a practical planning problem. 3 hours lecture. (003884)
Prerequisites: GEOG 320 or equivalent.
Study of the legal antecedents to California environmental impact legislation; analysis of environmental review procedures, environmental research, preparation and evaluation of EIRs, and conditional negative declarations. 3 hours discussion. (003949)
History of the attitudes, concepts, and public policy toward the American environment, including the natural, rural, and urban environments. Emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (004539)
Investigation and analysis of the political nature of the environmental crisis in the United States and the development of legal and administrative mechanisms for handling environmental problems. 3 hours lecture. (007596)
Review and analysis of the present and changing nature of planning and land-use control law, particularly as the law is applied in California. 3 hours seminar. (007605)
An introduction to ways that religious and secular world views and ethics influence attitudes, behaviors, and policies toward the environment, society, and economy. The course considers alternative views of self and society, the relationship between human beings and the natural world, and issues of lifestyle, justice, and sustainability. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (021200)

Note: ECON 355 and ECON 462 appear on two selection lists in the Option in Environmental Economics. Each course may be used to fulfill requirements for only one category.

The Option in International Economics: 21 units

The BA in Economics with an Option in International Economics is designed for those seeking a structured program in economics with an emphasis on international economics. Those declaring this option complete the core courses listed above, additional courses in economics (see below), and selected courses outside the Department of Economics.

Economics courses: 12 units

4 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ECON 103 or instructor permission.
A study on the theory of international finance and trade. In-depth analysis of what determines trade flows, gains from trade, and the international flow of capital and technology. Focus on international trade policies and institutions and a survey of current trade problems and conflicts. 3 hours lecture. (002672)
Prerequisites: ECON 103.
This course surveys theoretical approaches and policy options to the problems of development and underdevelopment in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Agricultural transformations, industrial development, balance of payments problems, the role of foreign aid, direct foreign investment, the economic role of international institutions such as the World Bank, and other related topics are included in this course. 3 hours lecture. (002673)
Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 102 or faculty permission.
A survey and analysis of economic development in the Pacific Rim and its linkages with politics, history, society, and foreign policy. Topics covered include trade, tariffs, subsidies, balance of payments, savings, investment, government deficits, environment, agricultural economics, and economic growth. 3 hours discussion. (002674)
Prerequisites: ECON 301.
Economic problems arising out of economic relations and interactions among nations. Current theory of international trade, capital flows, and finance. International economic institutions and their relationship to American foreign policy. 3 hours seminar. (002697)

International Economics Electives: 9 units

3 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Comparative analysis of the institution of slavery which places slavery in the Western Hemisphere into a global and historical context beginning with labor oppression systems in Asia, the Roman Empire, and Mediterranean cultures. The significance and impact of Africans on the cultural, economic, and political life of North and South American nations will be examined in detail. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000139)
Series of in-depth studies, both thematic and topical, concerning major issues and current problems in sub-Saharan Africa, employing an interdisciplinary approach. Topics covered include South Africa, and revolution and ecological crises in Africa. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (000146)
Case study examination of fundamental concepts, methods, and changing theoretical orientations of cultural anthropology. 3 hours lecture. (000507)
This course examines the cultural diversity of tourism as a global phenomenon, focusing on non-Western cultures and the impact of culture change in the 21st century. The development of tourism as a global industry is discussed as well as an analysis of types of tourists and motivation for travel to various destinations, such as cultural heritage tourism and ecotourism. Case studies illustrate the positive and negative impacts of tourism. 3 hours lecture. (000516)
Case studies of peoples of Australia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. Analysis of origins of indigenous peoples and cultures. Discussion of traditional cultures in this ecologically diverse area. 3 hours lecture. (000524)
Explores the historical and contemporary global movements of people, commodities, technology and ideas. Surveys the impacts of colonial relationships on the contemporary world, post-colonialism and the rise of the development era, and contemporary trends resulting in the increased social and cultural integration and differentiation of individuals and groups around the world. 3 hours lecture. (000582)
This course is an internship offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Field experience in working with economic data designed to complement the theoretical classroom curriculum and to give students work experience related to their studies. Placements are limited, so students must be screened. Units are dependent upon the number of hours in the field. May be repeated up to a maximum of 15 units. No more than 3 units can be counted toward 300-level Economics major requirement. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. (002677)

Note: ECON 389 must be taken for 3 units and may be counted only once for this requirement..

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Geography in the news. Analysis of current world conflicts and problem areas, with an emphasis upon examination of social, economic, political, and environmental realities. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003872)
This course is also offered as LAST 357 .
Study of the physical environment, human settlement, development, and modern problems of the nations of Latin America. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021143)
This course is also offered as MEST 362 .
Introduction to some major aspects of culture, society and the state in the Islamic Middle East, including Islamic religion, the Arab Empire, the family, law, roles of men and women, styles of living. Examination of the post-Mongol empires of Ottoman and Safavid, and their interaction with European powers in the early modern period. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004550)
This course is also offered as MEST 363 .
Survey of the modern Middle East from Napoleon's Conquest of Egypt (1798) to the second Gulf War (2003). Examination of the decline and collapse of the Ottoman Empire, rise of Middle Eastern nation-states, nationalistic movements, and politics in Turkey, Iran, Israel, and the Arab world. Analyses of cultural and political issues, such as the Palestinian question, Arab-Israeli conflict, modernization, secularization, and Islamic resurgence. 3 hours lecture. (021368)
This course explores tradition and new trends in 18th and 19th century China, the Western impact and the Chinese response, the nationalist and the communist movements, changes in values and the society after 1949, and the ongoing economic reforms. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004661)
This course is also offered as POLS 446D .
3 hours lecture. (004873)
This course is also offered as HIST 362 .
Introduction to some major aspects of culture, society and the state in the Islamic Middle East, including Islamic religion, the Arab Empire, the family, law, roles of men and women, styles of living. Examination of the post-Mongol empires of Ottoman and Safavid, and their interaction with European powers in the early modern period. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004550)
Prerequisites: MGMT 303.
An examination of the strategy, infrastructure, and business processes that foster effectiveness in global organizations. An analysis of the impact of cross-cultural differences on managerial issues such as motivation, discipline, work and leisure values, and collaboration. An analysis of issues in the global business environment, including the impact of labor conventions, legal systems, technology transfer, ethics, and e-commerce. 3 hours lecture. (005707)
Prerequisites: MKTG 305, Senior Standing.
A study of all aspects of marketing unique to international business. Examines the impact of cultures, ethics, history, politics, and social customs on marketing thinking and practices worldwide. 3 hours discussion. (005879)
Concepts in international politics, with emphasis on the analysis of contemporary global issues. Recommended for secondary teachers. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007500)
Examination of the international political economy and process of development. Specific focus is on the crisis of the world capitalist system and the international and national attempts to restructure levels of that system. The question of development is discussed from various ideological perspectives, along with the political-economic implications of industrialization and the debt crisis in developing countries. Case studies on the political economy of developing countries are offered. 3 hours lecture. (007530)
Analysis of the international political economy and industrial- post-industrial societies. Specific focus on the internationalization of capitalism and major institutions of the international political economy in the post-Cold War era; the competing models of North Amerian, European, and Asian political economies; trade, investment and security issues among industrial nations; and relationship of industrial nations' policy to the political economy of the developing world. 3 hours lecture. (007539)
This course is also offered as INST 446D .
3 hours lecture. (004873)
An introduction to major religions of the contemporary world (Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, and Chinese religions) with particular emphasis on their relationship to pressing global issues, including economics and poverty, environmental issues, war and peace, and human rights. Explores a number of religious traditions that are closely identified with specific ethnic groups in this country. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (008190)

Culture/Language Recommendation:

Those selecting this option are strongly encouraged to complete one or more of the following:

  • An intermediate foreign language course.
  • A study-abroad program.
  • Either the cultural immersion in Mexico (fall semester) or Costa Rica (spring semester) offered by the Latin American Studies and Geography programs.
  • An internship outside the United States.

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Double Majors

Please contact the Economics Department for advising regarding the use of economics courses to complete a second major.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

If you are considering economics graduate programs, additional math and statistics courses beyond the courses listed in the quantitative economics area are recommended.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  1. You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  2. You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  3. Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  4. Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  5. Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  6. Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

In addition to the common requirements for the Honors in the Major program given above, the Honors in Economics program includes the following:

  1. The professor of ECON 499H must recommend you.
  2. You must submit an application for this program. Please contact the Economics Department.
  3. Students who are admitted to the department's Honors in the Major program must complete 3 units of ECON 410, ECON 431, ECON 435, ECON 462, ECON 466, ECON 470, ECON 481, or ECON 483 with a grade of B or better. Unless other arrangements are made, the professor instructing the above course becomes your faculty mentor for that semester. In this course, you will define a research problem or performance area and develop an Honors Research Project/Thesis proposal in preparation for work in ECON 499H. Additional mentoring by the instructor assigned to ECON 499H will take place during the spring semester only. Note that you will not need to take ECON 495 if you take ECON 499H. Thus Honors in the Major does not increase the total units required for the Economics major.
  4. You must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 in your senior year.
Catalog Cycle:13