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The Bachelor of Arts in Kinesiology

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Degree MAPs page in the University Catalog or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Literacy Requirement:

See Mathematics and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog. Writing proficiency in the major is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of a course in your major which has been designated as the Writing Proficiency (WP) course for the semester in which you take the course. Students who earn below a C- are required to repeat the course and earn a C- or higher to receive WP credit. See the Class Schedule for the designated WP courses for each semester. You must pass ENGL 130I or JOUR 130I (or equivalent) with a C- or higher before you may register for a WP course.

Course Requirements for the Major: 52-65 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree. Additional required courses, depending upon the selected option are outlined following the major core program requirements.

Basic computer literacy skills are required for the Option in Physical Education Teacher Education and the Option in Outdoor Education. The requirement may be met through select college courses (e.g., CSCI 100, KINE 100, or UNIV 101) or through prior experience.

Major Core Program: 7 units

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Basic functioning of the organ systems of the human body, including the brain and nervous system; vision and hearing; heart and circulation; blood and immunity; respiration, digestion and metabolism; muscles; excretory, endocrine, and reproductive systems. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001114)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
This course examines the foundations of psycho-social principles, theories, and research related to sport and exercise behavior. Select topics include motivation, goal-setting, stress, anxiety, group dynamics, leadership, injury, and exercise adherence. Students learn how to integrate this knowledge into their given discipline. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (006898)

Major Option Course Requirements: 45-58 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required dependent upon the option chosen. Students must select one of the following options for completion of the major course requirements.  Use the links below to jump to your chosen option.



The Option in Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE): 45 units

Standard first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification are required.

Basic computer literacy skills are required. The requirement may be met through select college courses (e.g. CSCI 100, KINE 100, or UNIV 101) or through prior experience.

13 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Study of the structure of the human body, to include muscles, bones, heart, brain, ear, eye, and other systems, as well as a short look at development of the fetus. Lab work entails dissection of the cat and study of the human skeleton. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001110)
This course is designed for Single Subject majors and prospective teachers using a reflective approach to school based physical education. The course focuses on seven primary content areas to include teacher socialization, teaching/coaching role conflict, reflective teaching and learning, lifespan model of physical education, diversity and equity, and curriculum models. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (006933)
This course is designed for future physical education teachers and focuses on analysis and performance of martial arts/self-defense and net sports (badminton, pickleball, and volleyball). Psychomotor, cognitive and affective aspects of these sports are emphasized. This course aligns with the physical education model content standards for California K-12 public schools and incorporates developmentally appropriate practices. 3 hours lecture. (020995)
This course is designed to give students the tools and inspiration to become effective and reflective teachers of rhythms and dance in K-12 physical education programs. Students learn to analyze, perform, and teach fundamental movement skills set to different rhythms, leading to a variety of dance forms including creative dance, folk, line, hip-hop, square dance, and ballroom/social dance. The focus of the course is to learn to teach these skills in a developmentally appropriate manner, using effective teaching techniques and motivational strategies. Students also learn how rhythms and dance are integral components of both the CA state and national (NASPE) standards for K-12 physical education. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (006890)
The philosophies and objectives, curriculum content (movement concepts and motor skills), and evaluative techniques for developmentally appropriate children's physical education are emphasized. 3 hours lecture. (006892)
This course gives students a foundation in theory, philosophy, and methods used to teach developmentally appropriate outdoor and adventure education. Students explore imitative games, problem solving, low and high ropes course activities, rock climbing, orienteering, and legal liability and safety issues associated with developing programs. Although the course is designed for physical education majors, it is also appropriate for anyone wishing to incorporate adventure education into their curriculum. Field trips are required. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (006895)
A study of common disabilities found across the lifespan. Discussions are held about the historical and philosophical basis for adapted physical activity, and the impact of state and federal legislation. Analysis of the roles and responsibilities of the adapted physical education specialist and the inclusive educational environment also are examined. This course is applicable to all disciplines dealing with the disabled. 3 hours seminar. (015911)
Theories of motor development, acquisition, and refinement of skills as well as skill themes and movement concepts are studied. Physical, neurological, and physiological principles and qualitative changes in motor skills occurring from infancy to preadolescence and adolescence to older adulthood are analyzed. 3 hours lecture. (006935)
Prerequisites: BIOL 103 or faculty permission for non-majors, basic computer literacy skills.
Anatomical and mechanical bases of human movement with application to more skillful and safe performance. Qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis are introduced. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (006973)
Prerequisites: BIOL 104 or faculty permission for non-majors, basic computer literacy skills.
This course is an in-depth study of the physiology of exercise. Emphasis will be placed on energy metabolism during exercise and its relationship to the circulatory, pulmonary, and neuro-endocrine systems. Practical application will be stressed through discussions of clinical exercise physiology, exercise prescription, environmental exercise physiology, exercise and disease, special populations, biological adaptation, and the biology of peak performance. Concepts will be reinforced through laboratory exercises. 3 hours clinical, 2 hours activity. (006968)
Prerequisites: KINE 305, KINE 309.
Students learn about developmentally appropriate physical education for youth in middle school (grades 6-8). Students also learn about the philosophies and goals/objectives, curriculum content, and evaluative techniques using sport activities such as lacrosse, team handball, ultimate frisbee, and disc golf. 2 hours clinical, 2 hours activity. (006893)
Prerequisites: KINE 305, KINE 309, faculty permission.
The course is designed for the prospective physical education teacher. Application of tests and measurements in the evaluation process will be defined. Included will be the evaluation of sport skill, motor ability, physical performance, and cardiovascular fitness. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (006972)
Prerequisites: KINE 305, KINE 308, KINE 309, KINE 410, KINE 411.
This course is designed to provide students with the tools and inspiration needed to become effective and reflective teachers of physical education at the high school level. Students learn: how to use NASPE and CA State standards to develop quality lesson plans for instruction; concepts and techniques that promote developmentally appropriate physical education for youth in high school (grades 9-12); implications of research for teaching quality physical education focused on helping students become active for life; and the important role the physical educator plays in adolescents' physical activity participation. Students develop and improve their own knowledge and skills in health-related fitness activities such as cardio-kickboxing, yoga, and in-line skating. They also learn how to use a varity of fitness equipment in ways that fosters enjoyable fitness development for high school students. 2 hours clinical, 2 hours activity. (006894)

Activity Breadth Courses: 3 units

Select activity breadth courses with the prior approval of a PETE advisor.

3 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Aerobic fitness through dance. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006658)
Techniques of bicycling. Knowledge and understanding of the methods related to repair and maintenance of either the racing and/or touring bikes combined with short touring trips. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006663)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006666)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006668)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006669)
Skills, rules, tournament play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006675)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006714)
Skills, rules, etiquette, strategy, participation. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006721)
Skills, rules, etiquette, strategy, participation. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006722)
See description below. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006749)
Covers the basic history and philosophy of Japanese jujitsu as well as its application to self-defense. Students will acquire self-defense theory and skills, including escapes from grabs and holds, how and where to strike an assailant, how to roll and fall safely, and theories of attack and defense such as throwing, grappling, and submission techniques. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006750)
Introductory instruction in the non-aggressive martial art of Aikido. Students will acquire skills in controlled breathing, energy development, mind-body coordination, and self-defense. Exposure to traditional Japanese culture, discipline, and learning techniques are emphasized. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (006752)
Instruction in the martial art of TaeKwonDo. Students will learn the history and purpose of TaeKwonDo as well as developing self-discipline and skills for personal safety and protection. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006760)
Instruction in TaeKwonDo for students who have some knowledge of this martial art. Students will learn increased proficiency in mental and physical skills. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006761)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006775)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006774)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006777)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006778)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006779)
This is an introductory course in the study of Tai-Chi Chuan. Tai-Chi is a passive style of martial arts with gentle and fluid movements with emphasis on moving meditation, stress release and development of inner peace, strengthening the internal organs and increasing health and vitality. There are many styles of Tai-Chi. The style students learn is directly related to the Shao-Lin Chuan, which is an external form of martial arts referring to Shao-Lin Kung Fu. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (021116)
This is an introductory course in the study of various forms of martial arts. Students learn the basics of self defense strategies of schools of martial arts such as Muay Thai, Shuai Chiao, Judo, Hapkido, Yudo, Brazilian Jujitsu, kickboxing, and the dynamic movements of boxing and other forms of traditional martial arts. Course material is shared in three different modules during the course of the semester. Students are able to perform the basics of martial arts in a safe and friendly class. Students are exposed to the philosophy and culture of martial arts systems. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (021188)
For non-swimmers and those knowing only one or two elementary strokes. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006791)
Prerequisites: Ability to swim in deep water; satisfactory performance of front crawl, sidestroke, and elementary backstroke.
Improvements of stroke mechanics and conditioning. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006792)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006800)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006801)
Cultural orientation, rules, skills, and strategies, with primary application through game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006828)
Rules, strategies, and skills for the intermediate player, with primary application through game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006829)
Skills, rules, offensive and defensive strategy. Field player and goalie play, competition, and international styles of water polo. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006837)
Skills, rules, offensive and defensive strategy. Field player and goalie play, competition, and international styles of water polo. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006841)
Instruction in the techniques of weight training. Individually adapted exercise programs, and the basic development of strength, endurance, speed, and agility through specific weight training programs. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006846)
Instruction in the techniques of weight training. Individually adapted exercise programs, and the basic development of strength, endurance, speed, and agility through specific weight training programs. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006847)
Introduction to basic yoga postures. Study and practice of exercises for self-awareness, breathing, relaxation, visualization, and meditation. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006860)

Additional Information:

This option satisfies all requirements for subject matter competency in physical education for students pursuing a single subject teaching credential after completing the Option in PETE, providing GPA standards are met (2.67 cumulative, or 2.75 in the major). For students applying to the Single Subject Teaching Credential program at CSU, Chico, it is recommended that elective courses include ENGL 471, EDTE 302, and HCSV 451. Consult with a Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) advisor early for specific requirements and suggested electives that lead to supplementary authorizations to teach additional subjects in the state of California.

Optional Adapted Physical Education Specialist Credential: 20 units

In order to complete the specialist credential in adapted physical education, students must obtain or be working toward a credential that authorizes them to teach physical education. This credential allows future physical education teachers to instruct individuals with disabilities in the public schools. These courses may be taken in addition to the Option in Teacher Education program, but are not required for that option or degree.

7 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A study of common disabilities found across the lifespan. Discussions are held about the historical and philosophical basis for adapted physical activity, and the impact of state and federal legislation. Analysis of the roles and responsibilities of the adapted physical education specialist and the inclusive educational environment also are examined. This course is applicable to all disciplines dealing with the disabled. 3 hours seminar. (015911)
Prerequisites: First Aid and CPR or faculty permission; WSI recommended.
Specific instructor training in aquatics programs for individuals with disabilities. Inclusive and developmentally appropriate aquatic activities, sports, and games are included. Qualified students may earn Special Olympic coach's certification in aquatics. 2 hours clinical. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006784)

KINE 351 may be applied to the lower-division requirements.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: KINE 315 or faculty permission.
A study of disability sport and programming for individuals with orthopedic, neurological, and sensory disabilities. Evaluation of the anatomical and physiological implications and their effect upon psychomotor functioning. 3 hours clinical. (006897)
Prerequisites: KINE 315 or faculty permission.
A study of prescriptive programming for individuals with disabilities, including mental, emotional, learning, and other health impairments. Instructional methods and intervention strategies will be explored in the psychomotor domain. 3 hours lecture. (020035)
Prerequisites: KINE 315 or faculty permission.
The development and interrelationships personal-social aspects of human movement, groups, and physical education, recreation, and sport experiences throughout the lifespan for individuals with disabilities. Focus includes social influences and interrelationships of peer relations, professional interactions, interdisciplinary team dynamics, and family systems. 3 hours lecture. (006998)
Prerequisites: KINE 315 or faculty permission.
Assessment of physical growth, motor development and proficiency, nutrition, motor fitness, and perceptual motor characteristics of individuals with disabilities. Emphasis is placed on testing procedures, evaluation of screening devices, authentic assessment, and practical implementation. Specific assessment instruments will be those commonly used in an adapted physical education setting. 3 hours lecture. (006997)
Prerequisites: KINE 515, faculty permission.
Fieldwork with children in an adapted physical education setting. Involves assessing, diagnosing, and implementing individualized educational programs to meet the needs of the disabled populations. May include either teaching or coaching experiences. 9 hours supervision. (006999)

The Option in Movement Studies: 45-57 units

Option Core: 27-32 units

Lower-Division Activity Breadth Courses: 10-15 units

1 course required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Study of the structure of the human body, to include muscles, bones, heart, brain, ear, eye, and other systems, as well as a short look at development of the fetus. Lab work entails dissection of the cat and study of the human skeleton. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001110)

6 courses selected from:

Complete six courses from at least five of the seven groups below:

Aquatics Group

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Ability to swim in deep water.
This course is designed for students who have no previous experience scuba diving. Students will develop safe scuba diving practices through lecture, video, reading, and pool sessions. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to participate in Open Water Certification. 4 hours field studies. (006691)
For non-swimmers and those knowing only one or two elementary strokes. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006791)
Prerequisites: Ability to swim in deep water; satisfactory performance of front crawl, sidestroke, and elementary backstroke.
Improvements of stroke mechanics and conditioning. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006792)
Skills, rules, offensive and defensive strategy. Field player and goalie play, competition, and international styles of water polo. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006837)
Prerequisites: First Aid and CPR or faculty permission; WSI recommended.
Specific instructor training in aquatics programs for individuals with disabilities. Inclusive and developmentally appropriate aquatic activities, sports, and games are included. Qualified students may earn Special Olympic coach's certification in aquatics. 2 hours clinical. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006784)

Dance, Tumbling, or Gymnastics Group

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
The ballroom-dance sequence covers the range of contemporary social or ballroom dancing in Western culture. Beginning ballroom introduces the basic techniques of Waltz, Foxtrot, Swing, Samba, Rhumba, and Tango. For men only. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (002467)
The ballroom-dance sequence covers the range of contemporary social or ballroom dancing in Western culture. Beginning ballroom introduces the basic techniques of Waltz, Foxtrot, Swing, Samba, Rhumba, and Tango. For women only. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (002468)
Prerequisites: PHED 113M.
Intermediate ballroom builds upon the foundation of Beginning Ballroom. More sophisticated, modern, and complicated steps and dances are studied and mastered in a practical setting. For men only. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (002469)
Prerequisites: PHED 113V.
Intermediate ballroom builds upon the foundation of Beginning Ballroom. More sophisticated, modern, and complicated steps and dances are studied and mastered in a practical setting. For women only. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (002470)
This is an introductory survey course that reviews dance as an art form in both Western and Eastern cultures, to include ballet, modern, ethnic, social dance, jazz and musical theatre. Course content covers the roots of dance in world cultures to include social customs, religious beliefs, social structure, the community and dance theory that influence the dance aesthetic. Course employs lecture, film, and discussion. This is a web based course. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (021229)

Individual or Dual Group

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Skills, rules, tournament play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006675)
Skills, rules, etiquette, strategy, participation. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006721)
Skills, rules, etiquette, strategy, participation. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006722)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006800)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006801)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006802)

Outdoor Education/Recreation Group

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Basic understanding of topographic maps and the compass, combined with orienteering races. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. ABC/no credit grading. (006646)
Techniques of bicycling. Knowledge and understanding of the methods related to repair and maintenance of either the racing and/or touring bikes combined with short touring trips. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006663)
The wilderness experience is a special retreat into a different way of living; a journey away from the paved-over world that brings us new perceptions of ourselves. The backpacking course is a random collection of information, news, and sources about the wilderness. Tips on hiking gear, eating for the trail, and other wilderness details, plus actual wilderness experiences will be offered. 4 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (006677)
This course introduces students to indoor rock climbing and gives students basic skills, techniques, and safety elements necessary to climb efficiently and safely indoors. The class is taught in the Climbing Gym only and has no field trips. 1 hour lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 3.0 units. ABC/no credit grading. (006683)
This course introduces students to rock climbing. The class is held in the Climbing Gym in addition to three required field trips. Basic skills include climbing techniques, belaying, rappelling, and basic anchors. 4 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. ABC/no credit grading. (006684)
This course gives students an introduction to river kayaking skills on moving water and whitewater. Students gain an understanding of the equipment, techniques, and procedures to paddle and conduct kayaking activities in moving water and whitewater (up to Class III). Emphasis is on development of individual paddling skills, boat control, rescue techniques, safe paddling, and group management and travel on moving water. River hydrology, hazard identification, safety, judgment, and kayak outfitting are addressed. 4 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. ABC/no credit grading. (020733)
This course gives students an introduction to flat water, moving water and whitewater canoeing skills. Students gain an understanding of the equipment, techniques, and procedures to paddle in flat water, moving water, and whitewater environments. Emphasis is on the development of individual paddling skills, safe and conscientious paddling, and group management while on moving water. Boat control, maneuvering, safety, judgment, and canoe travel are addressed. 4 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (020816)

Personal Defense or Combatives Group

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
See description below. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006749)
Covers the basic history and philosophy of Japanese jujitsu as well as its application to self-defense. Students will acquire self-defense theory and skills, including escapes from grabs and holds, how and where to strike an assailant, how to roll and fall safely, and theories of attack and defense such as throwing, grappling, and submission techniques. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006750)
Introductory instruction in the non-aggressive martial art of Aikido. Students will acquire skills in controlled breathing, energy development, mind-body coordination, and self-defense. Exposure to traditional Japanese culture, discipline, and learning techniques are emphasized. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (006752)
Instruction in the martial art of TaeKwonDo. Students will learn the history and purpose of TaeKwonDo as well as developing self-discipline and skills for personal safety and protection. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006760)
This is an introductory course in the study of Tai-Chi Chuan. Tai-Chi is a passive style of martial arts with gentle and fluid movements with emphasis on moving meditation, stress release and development of inner peace, strengthening the internal organs and increasing health and vitality. There are many styles of Tai-Chi. The style students learn is directly related to the Shao-Lin Chuan, which is an external form of martial arts referring to Shao-Lin Kung Fu. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (021116)
This is an introductory course in the study of various forms of martial arts. Students learn the basics of self defense strategies of schools of martial arts such as Muay Thai, Shuai Chiao, Judo, Hapkido, Yudo, Brazilian Jujitsu, kickboxing, and the dynamic movements of boxing and other forms of traditional martial arts. Course material is shared in three different modules during the course of the semester. Students are able to perform the basics of martial arts in a safe and friendly class. Students are exposed to the philosophy and culture of martial arts systems. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (021188)

Team Sports Group

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006666)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006668)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006669)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006714)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006774)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006775)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006777)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis on the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006778)
Skills, rules, and strategy, with primary emphasis the application of skills and strategy in game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006779)
Cultural orientation, rules, skills, and strategies, with primary application through game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006828)
Rules, strategies, and skills for the intermediate player, with primary application through game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006829)
Rules, strategies, and skills for the advanced player, with primary application through game play. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006830)

Weight Training or Fitness Group

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Aerobic fitness through dance. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006658)
Skills, individualized fitness program, participation. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006818)
Instruction in the techniques of weight training. Individually adapted exercise programs, and the basic development of strength, endurance, speed, and agility through specific weight training programs. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006846)
Instruction in the techniques of weight training. Individually adapted exercise programs, and the basic development of strength, endurance, speed, and agility through specific weight training programs. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (006847)
Instruction in the techniques of weight training. Individually adapted exercise programs, and the basic development of strength, endurance, speed, and agility through specific weight training programs. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006852)
This course focuses on muscle strengthening and conditioning through a wide variety of techniques and modalities. Focus includes overall major muscle groups, core strengthening, trunk stabilization involving "traditional" strength training techniques in addition to work with stability balls, balance equipment, and strength training equipment including free weights, machines, body weight, weighted balls and mat work. 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 3.0 units. (020202)
Introduction to basic yoga postures. Study and practice of exercises for self-awareness, breathing, relaxation, visualization, and meditation. 2 hours field studies. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 2.0 units. (006860)

Upper-Division Courses: 17 units

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Theories of motor development, acquisition, and refinement of skills as well as skill themes and movement concepts are studied. Physical, neurological, and physiological principles and qualitative changes in motor skills occurring from infancy to preadolescence and adolescence to older adulthood are analyzed. 3 hours lecture. (006935)
Prerequisites: BIOL 103 or faculty permission for non-majors, basic computer literacy skills.
Anatomical and mechanical bases of human movement with application to more skillful and safe performance. Qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis are introduced. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (006973)
Prerequisites: BIOL 104 or faculty permission for non-majors, basic computer literacy skills.
This course is an in-depth study of the physiology of exercise. Emphasis will be placed on energy metabolism during exercise and its relationship to the circulatory, pulmonary, and neuro-endocrine systems. Practical application will be stressed through discussions of clinical exercise physiology, exercise prescription, environmental exercise physiology, exercise and disease, special populations, biological adaptation, and the biology of peak performance. Concepts will be reinforced through laboratory exercises. 3 hours clinical, 2 hours activity. (006968)
Prerequisites: KINE 322, KINE 323, or faculty permission.
Course is designed to offer sound, systematic training programs for those men and women who wish to apply strength and conditioning techniques to specific sports and/or physical activities. Various new and traditional weight training techniques and programs will be reviewed in light of desired outcomes for the individual participant in sports and physical activities. 3 hours lecture. (006959)
Prerequisites: At least junior standing and faculty permission.
Preparation and supervised practical work or leadership experience in various private and public agencies, organizations and services which may include: hospitals, recreation programs, community and professional organizations, health clubs, corporations, clinics, schools and athletic programs. Specific internship placements are required for given emphases and certifications. See your advisor. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. (006980)

Advising Pattern Course Requirements: 18-25 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required depending upon the advising pattern chosen. Students must select one of the following advising patterns for completion of the major course requirements.

Coaching and Administration Pattern: 24-25 units

Students wishing to pursue a career in coaching with any degree should consult a Kinesiology advisor. The California Interscholastic Federation (CIF) requires individuals who are not kinesiology majors to acquire coaching certification. CIF has approved this pattern, and individuals who satisfactorily complete the program are automatically qualified to coach. See your advisor to discuss career plans and appropriate selection of courses.

4 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course provides prospective coaches with knowledge about the psychological factors and principles used in coaching, team dynamics, and the enhancement of athletic performance. 3 hours lecture. (006990)
Prerequisites: Basic computer skills or faculty permission.
This course explores the principles and concepts involved in learning motor skills and the conditions that can influence that learning. Topics may include open and closed loop systems, feedback, attentional focus, inverted u-theory, practice schedules,and many others. 3 hours lecture. (006939)
Prerequisites: KINE 305, KINE 309, faculty permission.
The course is designed for the prospective physical education teacher. Application of tests and measurements in the evaluation process will be defined. Included will be the evaluation of sport skill, motor ability, physical performance, and cardiovascular fitness. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (006972)
Prerequisites: Basic computer literacy skills.
Course includes laboratory projects and written exams which cover the essential elements of administration/management of modern day physical education and athletic programs. Students will be systematically introduced to the meaning of management and the different styles of management in the conduct of specific programs such as intramurals, athletics, instructional programs, clubs, corporate fitness, etc. One major project will be designed by each student. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (007006)

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Course includes laboratory projects and written exams which cover the essential elements of coaching and performing in a team sport environment. One major project will be designed by each student. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (007007)
Prerequisites: Basic computer literacy skills.
Course includes laboratory projects and written exams which cover the essential elements of coaching and performing in an individual sport environment. One major project will be designed by each student. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (007008)

Note: Either KINE 331 or KINE 332 may be taken twice to meet this requirement.

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Student learning focuses on how sports and games are part of an integrated physiological, psychological, and social being in societies around the world. Students develop appreciation, understanding, and respect of various cultural contexts and how sport, games, and play behaviors are part of physical expression and cross-cultural interaction. Student learning in this area shall include consideration of how sport and games are related to human sociality, psychological, well-being, health, and wellness. Students also engage in physical activity participation in global games with emphasis on social relationships. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021258)
Prerequisites: BIOL 103, Basic First Aid or equivalent course.
Theory and practice in the prevention, care, and rehabilitation of injuries commonly encountered in sport and competitive athletics. Concepts of injury recognition and management will be covered. 3 hours clinical, 2 hours activity. (006902)
This course is also offered as SOCI 346 .
This course examines the connections between sport and society, including socialization, values, education, deviance, the economy, and the media. Attention is given to the ways that gender, race, social class, sexuality, and the body influence sports, as well as recent controversial issues such as player and fan violence, and drug abuse among athletes. 3 hours lecture. (006942)
Prerequisites: KINE 323; KINE 389, KINE 480 (may be taken concurrently).
This class provides the basic principles, applications, and experiences necessary to design, instruct, and supervise individuals in safe and appropriate exercise activities. The course incorporates theories of communication, program design, equipment selection, legal/liability considerations, assessment and follow up, business and marketing concepts related to the fitness industry. In addition, various theories of individual and group motivation, such as goal setting and problem solving as well as social support and reward systems, are discussed. The course provides relevant knowledge, skills, and practical applications to individuals who will someday or are currently responsible for developing and administering individual and group exercise programs, including personal trainers, physical education teachers, physical therapists, and coaches. 3 hours lecture. (020200)
Prerequisites: KINE 322 and basic computer literacy.
Introduction to research in biomechanics. Emphasis is on quantitative videographic techniques of sport and exercise activities. Other technological and bibliographic research methods are covered. 3 hours seminar. (007003)

Fitness and Wellness Pattern: 18-19 units

3 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Basic computer skills or faculty permission.
This course explores the principles and concepts involved in learning motor skills and the conditions that can influence that learning. Topics may include open and closed loop systems, feedback, attentional focus, inverted u-theory, practice schedules,and many others. 3 hours lecture. (006939)
Prerequisites: KINE 305, KINE 309, faculty permission.
The course is designed for the prospective physical education teacher. Application of tests and measurements in the evaluation process will be defined. Included will be the evaluation of sport skill, motor ability, physical performance, and cardiovascular fitness. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (006972)
Prerequisites: KINE 323.
Introduction to the essential principles and skills of exercise testing and prescription. Students acquire knowledge of and skill in risk factor and health status identification, fitness appraisal, and exercise prescription for low to moderate risk individuals and individuals with controlled diseases. Students demonstrate the ability to incorporate suitable and innovative activities that will improve an individual's functional capacity. In addition, advanced concepts of strength, flexibility and body composition are discussed. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (007023)

3 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Student learning focuses on how sports and games are part of an integrated physiological, psychological, and social being in societies around the world. Students develop appreciation, understanding, and respect of various cultural contexts and how sport, games, and play behaviors are part of physical expression and cross-cultural interaction. Student learning in this area shall include consideration of how sport and games are related to human sociality, psychological, well-being, health, and wellness. Students also engage in physical activity participation in global games with emphasis on social relationships. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021258)
A study of common disabilities found across the lifespan. Discussions are held about the historical and philosophical basis for adapted physical activity, and the impact of state and federal legislation. Analysis of the roles and responsibilities of the adapted physical education specialist and the inclusive educational environment also are examined. This course is applicable to all disciplines dealing with the disabled. 3 hours seminar. (015911)
Prerequisites: BIOL 103, Basic First Aid or equivalent course.
Theory and practice in the prevention, care, and rehabilitation of injuries commonly encountered in sport and competitive athletics. Concepts of injury recognition and management will be covered. 3 hours clinical, 2 hours activity. (006902)
This course is also offered as SOCI 346 .
This course examines the connections between sport and society, including socialization, values, education, deviance, the economy, and the media. Attention is given to the ways that gender, race, social class, sexuality, and the body influence sports, as well as recent controversial issues such as player and fan violence, and drug abuse among athletes. 3 hours lecture. (006942)
Prerequisites: Basic computer skills or faculty permission.
Methods of epidemiology are now being applied to sports performance, injury prevention and recovery, and exercise-related disease prevention. This course will cover observational study design and analysis, including elementary probability theory using Bayes rule, sampling, relative risk, odds ratio, data adjustment via elementary analysis covariance, and data extrapolation and prediction. 3 hours lecture. (006974)
Prerequisites: Bachelor's Degree in any discipline or KINE 322, KINE 323, KINE 480 or faculty permission.
Exercise Pathophysiology, formerly known as Medical Topics in Exercise Physiology, focuses on how exercise ameliorates various chronic disorders. The course addresses obesity, metabolic, cardiovascular, muscular, skeletal, and auto-immune disorders. 3 hours seminar. (007027)
Prerequisites: BIOL 103, BIOL 104, KINE 323, KINE 100 or faculty permission.
This course is designed to explore the diseases and injuries typically encountered in sports and exercise. Topics include physiology of adaptations, prevention of athletic injuries, physiology of trauma and inflammation, musculoskeletal arthritic, and environmental distress. 3 hours seminar. (007028)
Prerequisites: BIOL 103, BIOL 104, KINE 322.
The study of select human anatomy and specific pathomechanics related to sports and physical activity injuries. The course will focus on the role of anatomical structure and pathomechanical mechanisms of joint and tissue specific to injuries that occur to physically active populations. Previous study of human anatomy and kinesiology are required. 3 hours seminar. (007030)
Advanced study of sports and physical activity health care. Topics include concepts of pathological orthopedic radiography, pharmacology, surgical techniques and recovery, and current trends in human performance health care. Previous study of athletic injury evaluation and rehabilitation required. 3 hours seminar. (007032)

The Option in Outdoor Education: 58 units

Admission to the Outdoor Education Option is currently suspended. Please contact the Kinesiology Department for more information.

Basic computer literacy skills are required. The requirement may be met through select college courses (e.g. CSCI 100, KINE 100, or UNIV 101) or through prior experience.

Wilderness 1st Responder certification is a requirement for graduation with this degree. Please see the Coordinator of the Outdoor Education program for a list of accepted WFR providers.

10 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.
An examination of ecological principles and the impact of increasing population and technology upon the environment. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (001156)
This course provides the students an opportunity to participate in a series of challenge course activities involving mental, physical, and emotional risk-taking in a safe, supportive, positive learning environment. This course focuses on transferable knowledge from challenge course experiences to college, work, home, and life. The course concentrates on leadership principles; life long learning, physical movement, mental challenges, emotional risk-taking; decision making and problem solving; interpersonal and intrapersonal relationship skills, collaboration, and reflection. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory. (020716)
Prerequisites: KINE 123 or KINE 124 recommended.
This course is for outdoor education and recreation leaders and is an introduction to the skills and safety systems associated with beginning rock climbing (e.g., top rope climbing, rappelling, bouldering) and the management of rock climbing in outdoor programs. Additionally, teaching methods appropriate for rock climbing are discussed, demonstrated, and evaluated. This course requires additional field time taught on weekends. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory. Special fee required; see the Class Schedule. (006686)
Prerequisites: KINE 121 recommended but not required.
Introduction to basic summer backpacking skills, including equipment, nutrition, fitness, minimum impact camping, safety, beginning map and compass skills, leadership issues, and environmental ethics. Emphasis on technical applications and the implementation of these skills in adventure programs. Successful completion of this course meets the requirements for two national certifications: 1) The Wilderness Education Association's Wilderness Steward Certification; 2) Leave No Trace Trainer Certification. This course requires a ten-day field session taught over Thanksgiving break. 2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory. Special fee required; see the Class Schedule. (006700)
Prerequisites: KINE 226 or equivalent.
Introduction to winter wilderness living skills including nutrition, minimum impact camping, snow physics, avalanche, safety, medical issues, back country skiing techniques, snow shelters, leadership issues, and environmental ethics. Emphasis is on technical applications and the implementations of these skills in adventure programs. Successful completion of this class earns the student an American Institute of Avalanche Research and Education Level I certification. This is a physically demanding course requiring 10 continuous days of camping in winter conditions. It is not for the novice. 1 hour lecture, 9 hours laboratory. (006685)
Prerequisites: KINE 226 (may be taken concurrently).
This course gives students an introduction to whitewater canoeing and kayaking skills. Students gain an understanding of the equipment, techniques, and procedures to conduct canoeing and kayaking activities in flat water, moving water, and whitewater environments. Emphasis is on the development of individual paddling skills, safe and conscientious paddling, and group management while on moving water. This course requires additional field time taught on weekends. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory. Special fee required; see the Class Schedule. (006707)
This course provides the historical and philosophical foundations for using the outdoors as a medium for learning. Basic teaching and leadership styles used in instruction are emphasized, including a detailed look at the ethics involved in using the outdoors and adventure programming in education. 3 hours lecture. (007019)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200, or faculty permission.
Resources and needs for outdoor recreation: managing people and natural resources to provide quality outdoor recreation experiences. Study of historic, social, political, economic, and environmental factors influencing natural resources recreation at federal, state, and local levels. Survey of conflicts in natural resource land use. Required field trip. 3 hours lecture. (008782)
Prerequisites: RECR 200; concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 220, RECR 240, RECR 250, or RECR 260; or faculty permission.
Introduction to the study of law applicable to the management of recreation resources in providing valuable recreational experiences for clientele of public and commercial recreation programs and facilities. Examines general legal principles, legal aspects of provision of services by the private sector, contracts and contracting for recreation and park services, legal authority and methods in resource-based recreation areas, and legal liability in parks, recreation, and athletic programs. 3 hours lecture. (008818)
Prerequisites: BIOL 342 or GEOS 130 or NSCI 343 or equivalent.
This course is also offered as EDCI 448 .
Experiential-oriented survey of methods and materials for teaching environmental concepts in schools, communities, nature centers, camps, and parks. Exposure to history, theory, philosophy, and goals of environmental education programs. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002778)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A study of common disabilities found across the lifespan. Discussions are held about the historical and philosophical basis for adapted physical activity, and the impact of state and federal legislation. Analysis of the roles and responsibilities of the adapted physical education specialist and the inclusive educational environment also are examined. This course is applicable to all disciplines dealing with the disabled. 3 hours seminar. (015911)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200 or faculty permission.
A study of the characteristics and needs of diverse populations, specifically related to the delivery of inclusive leisure services. In-depth discussion of personal and societal attitudes, stereotypes, cultural competencies, legislation, accessibility, and program modification. Learning experiences include volunteer work, guest speakers, and wheelchair experience. This course is applicable to all disciplines dealing with diverse populations. 3 hours lecture. (008785)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: BIOL 103 or faculty permission for non-majors, basic computer literacy skills.
Anatomical and mechanical bases of human movement with application to more skillful and safe performance. Qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis are introduced. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (006973)
Prerequisites: BIOL 104 or faculty permission for non-majors, basic computer literacy skills.
This course is an in-depth study of the physiology of exercise. Emphasis will be placed on energy metabolism during exercise and its relationship to the circulatory, pulmonary, and neuro-endocrine systems. Practical application will be stressed through discussions of clinical exercise physiology, exercise prescription, environmental exercise physiology, exercise and disease, special populations, biological adaptation, and the biology of peak performance. Concepts will be reinforced through laboratory exercises. 3 hours clinical, 2 hours activity. (006968)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: KINE 460.
This course discusses the theoretical foundations of outdoor leadership. Instruction incorporates a focused investigation into the nature of outdoor leadership as a profession; including the theory and application of outdoor leadership and the core competencies of being an outdoor leader. The goal is to learn about the elements that comprise effective leadership in the outdoors. 3 hours lecture. (020981)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200, or faculty permission.
Study of the nature, scope, status, and historical development of professional leadership in recreation, parks, and special groups. Types, responsibilities, and criteria for positions. Professional preparation, certification, and licensing of personnel. Examination of professional body of knowledge, group dynamics, and theories of leadership. Competence, skills, and techniques of the supervisor and other professional personnel stressed. 3 hours lecture. (008822)

Professional Development: 16 units

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: KINE 226 and one of the following KINE 224, KINE 227, KINE 228 or equivalent.
Semester-long wilderness experience providing future teachers, counselors, and group leaders with a foundation to planning theory, goals, and safety practices of an extended wilderness expedition. The course is field-based, meaning that the classroom is remote wilderness settings. Key in this instruction is the participant's involvement in a group development experience while at the same time learning the skills, knowledge, and awareness necessary to conduct safe, ethical, and effective wilderness-based learning programs. Substitution with courses from the National Outdoor Leadership School, Outward Bound, the Wilderness Education Association, or other qualified programs is possible. 45 hours clinical. Special fee required; see the Class Schedule. ABC/no credit grading. (007022)
Prerequisites: KINE 470 or faculty permission.
Students who have demonstrated a high level of proficiency serve as assistant instructors in a selected Outdoor Education course. Students take active leadership roles; planning, sequencing and teaching adventure topics and skills; develop a comprehensive risk management plan. Students receive supervision and feedback on their leadership, instructional planning and teaching skills. The Teaching Assistant may need to be involved in field-based trips lasting 2 to 15 days and should, schedule accordingly. 1 hour seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 3.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (020982)

Note: The Immersion Semester may not be the right choice for all students. In these cases a student may select a total of 15 units from courses related to the profession with prior approval of their advisor.

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  1. You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  2. You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  3. Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  4. Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  5. Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  6. Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

Catalog Cycle:13