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The Bachelor of Arts in Social Science

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Degree MAPs page in the University Catalog or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Literacy Requirement:

See Mathematics and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog. Writing proficiency in the major is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of a course in your major which has been designated as the Writing Proficiency (WP) course for the semester in which you take the course. Students who earn below a C- are required to repeat the course and earn a C- or higher to receive WP credit. See the Class Schedule for the designated WP courses for each semester. You must pass ENGL 130I or JOUR 130I (or equivalent) with a C- or higher before you may register for a WP course.

Course Requirements for the Major: 45 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree. Additional required courses, depending upon the selected option are outlined following the major core program requirements.

Major Core Program: 6 units

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Pathway Foundation Quantitative Reasoning.
In this skills-based course, students learn the basics of computer hardware and software. They learn to use research and analytic tools needed to meet the demands of upper-division course work and to create professional presentations and Web content using electronic and conventional source materials in a safe and responsible manner. In addition to basic skills, through extensive use of the Internet this course puts the social world at the student's fingertips with the retrieval and analysis of survey data, exploration of the world using the latest in GIS technology, and participation in online collaborative communities appropriate to the social sciences. 3 hours seminar. (009054)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, 12 units in social sciences.
Analysis of the basic philosophical foundations of the social sciences, focusing on the nature of humans, the nature of society, social science as a science, and the role of the social scientist. Various paradigms which deal with these issues will be studied. Required for all Social Science majors. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (009090)

Major Option Course Requirements: 39 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required dependent upon the option chosen. Students must select one of the following options for completion of the major course requirements.  Use the links below to jump to your chosen option.



The Option in Multidisciplinary Studies: 39 units

6 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An introductory survey of macroeconomic analysis. Use of fundamental economic concepts to analyze the over-all economy. Determination of gross national product, rates of unemployment, problems of inflation, recession, and the use of governmental policies. Discussion of current problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002636)
An introductory survey of microeconomic analysis. Analysis of individual economic units: household, firms, and markets. Analysis of individual decision making. Supply and demand analysis. Type of market organization: competition, oligopoly, and monopoly. Discussion of current problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002638)
Geography in the news. Analysis of current world conflicts and problem areas, with an emphasis upon examination of social, economic, political, and environmental realities. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003872)
Examination of the political, economic, religious, and social structures of the ancient civilizations that are the focus of the sixth-grade history/social science curriculum in California public schools: Mesopotamia, Egypt, Kush, the Hebrews, Greece, India, China, Rome. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004492)
Examination of the political, economic, religious, and social structures of the medieval and early-modern civilizations that are the focus of the seventh-grade history/social science curriculum in California public schools: the Islamic world, China, Japan, Europe, the Americas, Ghana, and Mali. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004493)
Concepts in international politics, with emphasis on the analysis of contemporary global issues. Recommended for secondary teachers. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007500)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A regional study of our nation in terms of the physical earth and its human use. The course includes emphasis on issues and problems related to resources, environmental concerns, and settlement patterns. Cultural and regional differences in human-environmental relationships are compared and contrasted. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (003902)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
A regional and topical description of North America at selected time periods, including cultural groups, land tenure systems, settlement patterns, agriculture, exploration and mapping, resource use, urbanization, population and migrations, and present-day results. 3 hours discussion. (000412)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An examination of the various ethnic groups that came to America; the reasons for their emigration, their reception in the United States, special problems they encountered, and the contributions they made to American society. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. (004540)
This course focuses on the immigration and subsequent history of California's different ethnic groups. It explores their interactions and the effects on the social, political, and economic development of the state. The course is required for Liberal Studies majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. (009060)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
1914-1945. An examination of American society in an era of world wars, economic instabitility, and great cultural change. 3 hours seminar. (004632)
1945 to 1974. The United States from Hiroshima to the 1970s, its social structure and economic dynamics as the dominant world power in an age of revolution that includes an atomic arms race and a threatened natural environment. 3 hours seminar. (004633)
An historical perspective on major developments in American national life during the final decades of the twentieth century, including the emergence of the New Right, globalization of the economy, the "culture wars," the end of the Cold War, the growth of multicultural diversity in the United States, the rise of the postmodern sensibility, and the information and communication revolution. 3 hours seminar. (004635)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Analysis of the history and development of the American federal system and the role of state and local governments, with special emphasis directed to the government and politics of California. Among the major topics considered: the state and local political systems; the political environment; party, interest group, citizen, and media inputs; and current problems and changing functions affecting state and local governments. 3 hours lecture. (007524)
Prerequisites: POLS 402 and POLS 473 are recommended.
Course will focus on the lobbying process at the state and national level and will consider the role interest groups play within the American-state governmental milieu. 3 hours lecture. (007526)
Considers tensions between the democratic and republican claims in formative periods: Puritan, Revolutionary, Constitution, Jacksonian, and Civil War. Addresses modern implications. Uses primary sources and novels. 3 hours lecture. (007551)
Analysis of judicial cases and related materials illustrating historical and current interpretations of constitutional problems such as the powers of the courts, congress, and President; and the balance of federal-state power in such areas as commerce and taxation. 3 hours lecture. (007577)
This course is also offered as MCGS 451B .
Analysis of judicial cases and related materials illustrating historical and current interpretations of constitutional problems such as racial discrimination, criminal procedures, and freedom of speech and religion. 3 hours lecture. (005645)
A comparative analysis of the executive component of government. Emphasis on the national executive, selected state executives, and selected executives in other nations. 3 hours lecture. (007609)
Analysis of the structure, processes, and behavior in legislative bodies. Emphasis on a comparison of selected legislative bodies. 3 hours lecture. (007610)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Case study examination of fundamental concepts, methods, and changing theoretical orientations of cultural anthropology. 3 hours lecture. (000507)
Prerequisites: ECON 103.
This course surveys theoretical approaches and policy options to the problems of development and underdevelopment in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Agricultural transformations, industrial development, balance of payments problems, the role of foreign aid, direct foreign investment, the economic role of international institutions such as the World Bank, and other related topics are included in this course. 3 hours lecture. (002673)
A systematic survey of human economic activities. Analysis of resource exploitation and use, including agriculture, extractive activities, industry, commerce, and service functions. Recommended for business and liberal arts majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003871)
The political dynamics of selected developing countries. Major emphasis is on problems of poverty, colonialism, comparative political structures and behavior, imperialism, and international relations. The course also focuses on tensions in the political culture between traditional and non-traditional values in developing societies. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (015554)
A study of the demographic patterns of mortality, fertility, migration, and refugees. Considered are influences such as inequality, economic development, environmental changes, and war on global populations. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (008957)
This is an exploration of the fundamental concepts of human biological, social, and cultural evolution. It is a comparative study of adaptation, social organization, religious and other ideological systems in contemporary non-Western societies. With a multidisciplinary approach, the course covers the biological basis of human social behavior, fossil evidence for human evolution, and relevant ethnographic and archaeological evidence of human social evolution. This course is required for Liberal Studies majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (009062)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as LAST 357 .
Study of the physical environment, human settlement, development, and modern problems of the nations of Latin America. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021143)
Examination of the developments and events that are the focus of the tenth-grade history-social science curriculum: the French Revolution, industrialization, imperialism, the world wars, totalitarianism, the Cold War, nation-building in the Third World, and global economic and technological integration. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved General Education course. (004491)
This course is also offered as MEST 362 .
Introduction to some major aspects of culture, society and the state in the Islamic Middle East, including Islamic religion, the Arab Empire, the family, law, roles of men and women, styles of living. Examination of the post-Mongol empires of Ottoman and Safavid, and their interaction with European powers in the early modern period. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004550)
This course is also offered as MEST 363 .
Survey of the modern Middle East from Napoleon's Conquest of Egypt (1798) to the second Gulf War (2003). Examination of the decline and collapse of the Ottoman Empire, rise of Middle Eastern nation-states, nationalistic movements, and politics in Turkey, Iran, Israel, and the Arab world. Analyses of cultural and political issues, such as the Palestinian question, Arab-Israeli conflict, modernization, secularization, and Islamic resurgence. 3 hours lecture. (021368)
Africa since 1800. Establishment and demise of European colonial regimes, African resistance to foreign domination, African political systems, dilemmas of socio-economic development, and gender differences in modern African life. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004533)
Cultural, economic, and political evolution of eastern Asia from 1800 to the present. Emphasis on the transformation of the traditional heritage of China and Japan through revolution and modernization. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education Capstone course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021358)
This course covers the five themes of geography (location, place, human-environmental interaction, movement, and region) for use in the K-12 classroom. The impact of these themes on physical geography, human culture, and economic development is also emphasized. Skills include mapping of data, using appropriate geographical software, creating charts and diagrams, and interpreting information contained in an atlas. This course is required for Liberal Studies majors and History-Social Science single subject credential students. 3 hours lecture. (009059)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ANTH 303 or permission of instructor.
This course presents theories and methods of ethnography as well as the ethics of ethnographic fieldwork. Students conduct supervised ethnographic research and present their results both orally and in written format. 6 hours activity. (000610)
Analysis of various field techniques and tools employed by geographers, and supervised application of field techniques in geography. Written and oral presentation of Field Survey. 6 hours activity. (003939)
Introduction to archival research and source materials. Practical experience in locating, interpreting, and using the various kinds of primary documents that form the raw material of the historian's craft. 3 hours seminar. (004707)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
An introduction to the discipline of political science, with emphasis on the major controversy of substance and method therein. Should be taken at the beginning of the junior year. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (007495)
This course explores the logic and styles of sociological research, focusing on the methods of formulating research problems, the design of social research, and techniques for ensuring the quality and validity of data and conclusions. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches to research are examined. 3 hours seminar. (008969)
Prerequisites: Students must have completed one 499H in a Behavioral and Social Science department prior to enrollment.
Open only by invitation to students with 3.5 GPA or higher in the major and faculty permission. Revision of a research paper into publishable form. Student will be required to make a public presentation of the paper. 3 hours seminar. (009094)

The Option in Specialization Studies: 39 units

Primary Concentration: 24 units

Secondary Concentration: 15 units

Students are required to select a primary area of concentration for 24 units (15 units minimum at the upper-division level) and a secondary area of concentration for 15 units (9 units minimum at the upper-division level) from the following areas of concentration.

Areas of Concentration: 15-24 units

Alternative Dispute Resolution: 15-24 units

Core Program

4 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course explores creative, integrative approaches to conflict resolution. Includes bargaining games, role-plays, cases, issues in conflict management, interpersonal influence processes, cultural, and ethical implications of bargaining problems and personal negotiating styles. 3 hours lecture. (005703)
Focus on the various methods of negotiation and dispute resolution including mediation and arbitration with primary emphasis on the legal rights and principles involved in alternative dispute resolution especially in the process of arbitration. Major social and scientific theories of conflict will be explored as well as conventional disciplines and new approaches of conflict avoidance and resolution. Ethical issues involved in negotiation, mediation, and arbitration will be covered. 3 hours lecture. (007579)
Learn techniques of legal research and writing. Write briefs, memoranda, and other legal documents based on library research with cases, treatises, law reviews, statutes, regulations, etc. 3 hours lecture. (007581)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
See description below. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (007621)

See Internship Policy below.

For a primary concentration, select four elective courses for an additional 12 units. For a secondary concentration, select one elective course for an additional 3 units.

Electives

1-4 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: At least junior standing.
An in-depth study of federal and California employment laws as they affect the management of human resources, with appropriate consideration of ethical and global dimensions. Emphasis is on the legal rights and responsibilities of employers and employees in the employment relationship, primarily in a private-sector, non-union environment. 3 hours discussion. (001352)
Prerequisites: At least junior standing or faculty permission.
Intensive examination of unions in an organizational setting. Includes organizational and concerted activities, collective bargaining and employee/employer rights and responsibilities. Includes applied collective bargaining project. 3 hours discussion. (001343)
A critical examination of diverse philosophical views regarding the causes of war and the prospects for peace. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved General Education course. (021191)
An interdisciplinary cross-cultural survey of prospects for peace. Focuses on non-violent modes of conflict resolution. Major philosophical and social scientific ideas from both the pacifist and non-pacifist traditions are examined in depth. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (021192)
A study of the learning of political attitudes; the role of the family, school, peer group, and others in the political socialization process; the process of accommodation or non-accommodation to the value patterns of society and ultimate political behavior. 3 hours lecture. (007545)
This course is also offered as PHIL 438 .
The philosophical nature and origins of law. Topics to be examined include theories of law, justice, the relationship of law to morality, natural law, responsibility, punishment, and other basic concepts. Approach is both theoretical and via case studies. 3 hours lecture. (007282)
Analysis of the development and activities of various types of international organizations, including the United Nations, multinational corporations, OPEC, the Common Market, the IMF, the World Bank, and such non-governmental organizations as Amnesty International and Greenpeace. 3 hours lecture. (007561)
Prerequisites: POLS 460A or concurrent enrollment.
An intensive examination of the theory and research on organizational design, with an emphasis on applications of the theories. Focus is on how organizations develop structures to meet various internal (e.g., size, technology) and external (e.g., stakeholders, uncertainty) demands. 3 hours lecture. (007597)
Study of the role of administrative law in American government. Scope and implications of discretionary decision-making. 3 hours lecture. (007599)
Prerequisites: Approval of the Department of Political Science.
This course is a special topic offered for 1.0-15.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Organized research and development of a problem in community administration. Students may enroll for 1 to 15 units, and will engage for a part or the whole of their time in the community. A seminar focusing on analysis of the project and the experience will be held weekly or at other appropriate times. Only a total of 6 units of POLS 489 and POLS 493 may be counted toward the requirements of the major or the Paralegal Certificate. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. (007655)

Anthropology: 15-24

3 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Biological evolution and variation in humans, mankind's place in nature, origin, and antiquity as represented in the fossil record; recent studies of non-human primates; the beginnings of culture. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000505)
Case study examination of fundamental concepts, methods, and changing theoretical orientations of archaeology. Archaeology in the contemporary world, and archaeology as a profession. 3 hours lecture. (000506)
Case study examination of fundamental concepts, methods, and changing theoretical orientations of cultural anthropology. 3 hours lecture. (000507)

5-14 units selected from:

Any Anthropology (ANTH) course offerings.

Asia: 15-24 units

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as AAST 110 .
This interdisciplinary course offers students an introduction to some of the many issues facing Asian nations today, grounded in an understanding of the historical, cultural, religious, and philosophical influences that underlie these challenges. The course examines the role of individuals in creating societal change in Asia through such things as political advocacy, cultural innovation, technological invention, the generation of literature, economic decision-making, military force, corruption, and other methods of influence. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021219)
This course is also offered as ANTH 200 .
An introduction to the people and cultures of Asia, emphasizing India, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific. The course employs a multimediated approach to learning. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (000523)

For a primary concentration you must complete a minimum of one class in each of the three areas: Asian History and Cultures, Asian Politics, and Asian Religions.

For a secondary concentration you must complete at least one upper-division course in each of the three areas: Asian History and Cultures, Asian Politics, and Asian Religions.

Asian History and Cultures

1-2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Case studies of peoples of Australia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. Analysis of origins of indigenous peoples and cultures. Discussion of traditional cultures in this ecologically diverse area. 3 hours lecture. (000524)
This course is also offered as HIST 123 .
Survey of how Asian directors address historical memory in film. Emphasis on media/film analysis and Asian film aesthetics from mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, and South Korea. 3 hours lecture. (021100)
Cultural, economic, and political evolution of eastern Asia from antiquity to 1800. Emphasis on common traditional heritage of China and Japan. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004560)
Cultural, economic, and political evolution of eastern Asia from 1800 to the present. Emphasis on the transformation of the traditional heritage of China and Japan through revolution and modernization. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education Capstone course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021358)
This course explores tradition and new trends in 18th and 19th century China, the Western impact and the Chinese response, the nationalist and the communist movements, changes in values and the society after 1949, and the ongoing economic reforms. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004661)
History of Japan from the end of exclusion (about 1853) to the present, with emphasis on the modernization of Japan and the road to Pearl Harbor. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004660)

Asian Politics

1-2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An examination of the politics of Asia. Emphasis may vary among East, South-East, and South Asia. The study of the response of Asian political systems to the dual challenges of modernization and Western pressure will be combined with an analysis of contemporary political institutions and events. 3 hours lecture. (007535)
This course is also offered as INST 446D .
3 hours lecture. (004873)

Asian Religions

1-2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An introduction to the religions of the East: Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (008128)
This course provides an introduction to the religions and cultures of India and the surrounding region known as South Asia. The main traditions that are examined are Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Islam, and Sikhism, all of which have deeply influenced the wider culture and each other throughout their evolution over the centuries in India. Students become acquainted with their doctrinal, philosophical, devotional, ritual, and social features. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (008181)
An exploration of the religious dimension of Chinese culture, focusing on the Confucian, Buddhist, and Chinese Buddhist traditions (with particular attention to Chan/Zen) and their relations with each other. 3 hours seminar. (021194)
A discussion of the roots and transformation of the Buddhist teachings in India, China, Japan, and Tibet. Special emphasis will be given to major trends and problems in contemporary Buddhism. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021199)

California Studies: 15-24 units

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Broad overview of spatial and temporal changes in the California landscape resulting from the interaction of various cultural groups with their environment. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (003860)
The historical cultural geography of the American West, emphasizing how various cultural groups have each made a unique imprint on the western landscape. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (003861)

For a secondary concentration you must complete at least one course in three of the following four areas:

Culture

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An interdisciplinary study of the culture, oral, and written literature of an American ethnic group or groups, with emphasis on ties to particular regions and traditions. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000408)
An interdisciplinary study of the culture, oral, and written literature of an American ethnic group or groups, with emphasis on ties to particular regions and traditions. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021235)
This course studies American culture and the various ways in which particular cultural products reinforce, oppose, underscore, or resist the values of the dominant culture - we also explore the gaps between the explicit and the implicit in those cultural values. Our discussions of these texts sustain an ongoing conversation about the various ways science and technology drive and are driven by the movements in culture we explore. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021118)
This course studies American culture and the various ways in which particular cultural products reinforce, oppose, underscore, or resist the values of the dominant culture - we also explore the gaps between the explicit and the implicit in those cultural values. Our discussions of these texts sustain an ongoing conversation about the various ways science and technology drive and are driven by the movements in culture we explore. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021236)

Electives

1-2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: GEOS 101 or GEOS 102 or consent of instructor.
Geologic setting of California and historical development of its geologic provinces. The impact of earthquakes, volcanic activity, coastal erosion, and earth resources on California. Field trip required. 3 hours discussion. (004085)
Prerequisites: Junior standing, the approval of the Social Science Program Coordinator, faculty permission.
This course is an internship offered for 1.0-15.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. The internship experience is designed to supplement academic work in social science and to provide students with occupational experience. 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (009084)

See Internship Policy below.

History and Politics

1-2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Social, economic, cultural, and political development from Spanish explorations to the present. 3 hours seminar. (004634)
Analysis of the history and development of the American federal system and the role of state and local governments, with special emphasis directed to the government and politics of California. Among the major topics considered: the state and local political systems; the political environment; party, interest group, citizen, and media inputs; and current problems and changing functions affecting state and local governments. 3 hours lecture. (007524)

Populations

1-2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as AIST 362 .
Native peoples of California, their origin, prehistory, languages, culture, and interaction with Europeans. Selected case studies, with special emphasis on the local area. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000519)
This course is also offered as SOCI 358 .
This course examines the economic, social, and political status of Chicanos and Chicana in the United States since the 1960's Chicano Movement. Students also consider issues such as immigration, stratification, educational attainment, labor market inequality, and resistance movements. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. (001980)
This course focuses on the immigration and subsequent history of California's different ethnic groups. It explores their interactions and the effects on the social, political, and economic development of the state. The course is required for Liberal Studies majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. (009060)

Career and Life Planning: 15-24 units

4 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Many people spend the majority of their waking hours occupied with work. This course examines the structure and organization of work and its influence on many aspects of our lives, with some attention to personal career interests. Topics include the social history of work, the meaning of work, labor struggles, relations within the workplace, socialization into occupations, and global changes in work. 3 hours lecture. (009003)
This is a course in career assessment. Students will explore the foundational issues in psychometrics, including the nature and uses of tests, ethical considerations, and concerns in test administration. Classes of vocational assessments and their exemplars will be presented. Assessment batteries for special needs clients will also be examined. Students will consider issues which are of specific concern when using formal assessment tools in decision making in career interventions. Interpretations of specific instruments and the relationship of formal assessments to other modes of information gathering will be discussed. 3 hours lecture. (009074)
Development of techniques for comprehensive career counseling, including goal setting and decision making; career exploration; career and life-role integration; ethnicity, race, and gender problems. 3 hours lecture. (009077)
This course focuses on the application of career development theories, issues, and resources for diverse clientele in education, public and private agencies. Topics include occupational databases, career investigation, decision making, job search skills, program development, and ethical concerns. The course is useful for teachers and social service agency personnel. 3 hours seminar. (009081)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Introduction to the nature and development of personality, with emphasis on the normal adult, including theories of personality, techniques of assessment, and a survey of current research. 3 hours lecture. (007944)
An overview of social psychology, emphasizing the variety of social factors that influence individual behavior. 3 hours lecture. (007952)
This course explores the relationship between the individual and society by focusing on how people create and sustain their daily lives. The emphasis is on interacations with others, and the effect of individual behavior upon group dynamics. Socialization, identities and the self, emotions, conformity, and communication are explored. 3 hours lecture. (008994)
Corequisite: SWRK 302 for SWRK majors only.
This course presents a framework for understanding and openly interacting with people from diverse backgrounds that compose the rich mosaic of the United States. The class is designed to promote ethnic-sensitive interpersonal relationships. Diverse people studied are distinguished by issues of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, disability, religion/spirituality, generation, and national origin. Historical and cultural experiences shaping their lives and current reality are examined. The overall goal is for students to develop high regard for the worth and dignity of all people. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. (009415)
Corequisites: SWRK 200 for majors only.
Using a systems framework and selected human behavior theories across the lifespan, the biological, social, psychological, and cultural influences on individuals, families, and groups are investigated. Particular emphasis is given to ethnic and cultural diversity and promoting student self-reflection across generations and cultural competence. 3 hours lecture. (009416)

For the 24-unit concentration, the following additional courses must be taken.

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course explores the history and experiences of women in the workplace and how family roles intersect with both paid and unpaid work, in and out of the home in the United States. Considered are the impacts of race, class, gender, and globalization on poverty, child and elder care, and workplace equity. International comparisons are drawn. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (008960)
How is the human life course, shaped by society and historical time periods? This course examines the dynamic nature between individual lives, social generations, and social change. Cultural and structural influences on personal identities are considered, as well as life transitions and aging. 3 hours lecture. (008992)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Using a combination of theory and application, this course focuses on the human side of organizations, including issues of 1) making good decisions, 2) enhancing performance, 3) steering through a turbulent global environment, 4) combining and unifying multiple business functions and 5) enabling change. Students gain an understanding of management and how and why organizations are structured. The themes of quality, technology, ethics, and adaptation are emphasized. 3 hours lecture. (005704)
This course surveys human resource management practices needed for effective performance by every manager and employee. The focus of the course is on processes used to effectively recruit, select, develop, evaluate, reward, and ensure the safety of employees in order to attract and retain the best possible workforce in any organization. This course provides students with an understanding of workforce diversity, investigates ethical issues, and explores the international context of HRM. 3 hours lecture. (005690)
Prerequisites: POLS 460A or concurrent enrollment.
An intensive examination of the theory and research on organizational design, with an emphasis on applications of the theories. Focus is on how organizations develop structures to meet various internal (e.g., size, technology) and external (e.g., stakeholders, uncertainty) demands. 3 hours lecture. (007597)
Psychological principles and practices in industrial and business settings. 3 hours lecture. (007967)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: MGMT 303.
An examination of the knowledge, skills, and values that foster personal and managerial success. This course presents a multidimensional approach to success that emphasizes reflective thinking, including ethical considerations. 3 hours discussion. (005693)
Prerequisites: Junior standing, the approval of the Social Science Program Coordinator, faculty permission.
This course is an internship offered for 1.0-15.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. The internship experience is designed to supplement academic work in social science and to provide students with occupational experience. 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (009084)

See Internship Policy below.

Child Development: 15-24 units

Foundation

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: concurrent registration or prior completion of CHLD 250 or CHLD 252.
This course includes acquisition and application of basic observation skills regarding children's physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development. (Required for students enrolled in CHLD 250.) 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (001441)
Physical, mental, social, and emotional factors of human growth and development from infancy through adolescence. Supervised experience working with children is strongly encouraged. 3 hours lecture. (007925)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Registration in CHLD 251 for Child Development majors and minors.
A study of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of children from conception through adolescence. The course examines genetic, biological, and environmental influences including cross-cultural issues. Scheduled observation in the Associated Students Child Development Laboratory (ASCDL) is met through enrollment in CHLD 251. 3 hours discussion. (001440)
Designed for Nursing, Liberal Studies, Communication Sciences & Disorders, and other non-Child Development majors, this course studies the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of children from conception through adolescence. The course explains genetic, biological, and environmental influences including cross-cultural issues. Scheduled observations are included. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (001442)

Family

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252 or CHLD 255 or PSYC 355, faculty permission.
This course is an advanced study of the interpersonal relationships among family members. Topics of reading and discussion include theories and research on family structure and function, family crises, child raising patterns, family finances, and other related topics as per instructor choice. 3 hours discussion. (001462)
This course examines the family as an institution and as a personal and intimate arena of meaning and interaction. With an emphasis on the U.S. and their own experiences, students examine issues of race/ethnicity, sex/gender, and social class; historical changes in family structure and function; and power relations within the family and society at large. 3 hours lecture. (008961)

Ages and Stages

For a secondary concentration, 3 units are required. For a primary concentration, 6 units are required.

1-2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.
Basic biological principles, including the scientific method, reproduction, development, physiology, and anatomy. The biological basis of childhood diseases, immunity, nutrition, issues of health and well-being, and the relevance of biological information in social, political, and ethical decision making regarding children. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (001151)
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252 or PSYC 355.
This class examines the physical, cognitive, emotional, and psychosocial aspects of growth during the school-aged years (ages 5 through 12), as well as contextual influences (e.g., family, school, peer group) on children's development. Particular attention is paid to the implications of developmental patterns for those who work with school-aged children. 3 hours lecture. (001449)
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252 or PSYC 355.
This course provides a broad research and theory-based overview of physical, cognitive, emotional, social, moral, and identity development during adolescence. An ecological framework is used to examine the influence of sociocultural contexts, ethnicity, gender, family, peers, and school settings on adolescent experience and development. 3 hours discussion. (001461)
An examination of the status, needs, and trends in the health of America's children, including selected racial/ethnic groups. The course includes an overview of physical growth and development from the prenatal period to early adolescence; discussion of common health problems, causes, symptoms, treatment, and prevention; and addresses selected health issues such as diet, physical activity, stress, violence, drugs, sexuality, and environmental risks. An overview of current and potential health services and prevention programs for children is included. 3 hours discussion. (004441)

For a primary concentration only, select one course from each of the following.

Psychology

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Examination of psychological factors involved in the learning processes of children. 3 hours lecture. (007884)
Prerequisites: Recommended: PSYC 355 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently).
Study of current concepts, principles, and issues related to exceptional development. The focus is on children with various exeptionalities, e.g., behavior disorders, learning disabilities, communication disorders, physical impairments, motor and neurological impairments, and gifts or talents, to gain a better understanding of human diversity. Exceptional children are studied within the context of their families, as well as emphasizing the support services necessary to facilitate optimum development. 3 hours lecture. (007947)
This is a survey course recommended for students interested in all types of exceptional learners and a prerequisite to professional preparation programs in the Department of Professional Studies in Education. Content includes (1) an overview of the characteristics, identification, and educational needs of special populations, (2) social, familial, biological, historical, cultural, economic, political, and legal contexts in which special education occurs, and (3) characteristics of effective programs. Includes a service learning experience. 3 hours lecture. (003010)

Social Policy

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252, CHLD 251.
This course focuses on the role of the program administrator in various types of licensed child development facilities. Topics include programming, fiscal oversight, licensing regulations, personnel decisions, legal issues, and management aspects of children's programs. 3 hours seminar. (001463)
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252, CHLD 251, senior standing.
This course is the study of inter-relationships among staff, parents, and children in child development programs. It includes knowledge of parent education, communication techniques, staff management and relationships, observation of parent meetings, and other aspects of program functioning. 3 hours seminar. (001460)
Acquaints students with the relevant history and concepts of child welfare. Examines abuse, neglect, molestation, prostitution, pornography, day care, teen pregnancies, foster care, intergenerational issues, and adoptions. Focuses on the application of generalist social work knowledge, values, and skills, and the problem-solving process to child welfare practices. Required for Title IV-E students. 3 hours lecture. (009425)

Economics: 15-24 units

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An introductory survey of macroeconomic analysis. Use of fundamental economic concepts to analyze the over-all economy. Determination of gross national product, rates of unemployment, problems of inflation, recession, and the use of governmental policies. Discussion of current problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002636)
An introductory survey of microeconomic analysis. Analysis of individual economic units: household, firms, and markets. Analysis of individual decision making. Supply and demand analysis. Type of market organization: competition, oligopoly, and monopoly. Discussion of current problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002638)

9-18 units selected from:

Any other Economics (ECON) course offerings.

Environmental Planning: 15-24 units

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Introduction to essential geographic problem solving techniques which include: data collection, analysis, and presentation of spatial information. Techniques include map measurement and interpretation, aerial photo analysis, field observations with GPS, introductory geographic information systems, computer cartography, summary of numerical data, elementary probability, distributions, and introduction to statistical inference. This is an inductory tools course for students majoring in geography, the natural and earth sciences, and in such applied fields as planning and recreation. Several software analysis packages are introduced. 3 hours lecture. (015867)
Geographic analysis of humanity's interaction with the environment. Examines natural and human systems, resources, population, energy, and pollution. Develops an appreciation of the beauty, balance, and complexity of natural systems and human success in attaining harmony with them. Enhances awareness and perception of each individual's role in and with the environment. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (003873)
Study of the theory and practice of planning. Analysis of planning processes, elements of the comprehensive plan, zoning, environmental impact of development, regional policies, and growth. Includes investigation of a practical planning problem. 3 hours lecture. (003884)
Examination of economic, social, demographic, and political bases for sustainable community and regional development and planning. Introduces the theory, evolution and practice of planning for sustainable communities and regions through examination of environmental, economic, and equity issues. 3 hours discussion. (003947)
Prerequisites: GEOG 320 or equivalent.
Study of the legal antecedents to California environmental impact legislation; analysis of environmental review procedures, environmental research, preparation and evaluation of EIRs, and conditional negative declarations. 3 hours discussion. (003949)

For a secondary concentration you are required to take the 15-unit concentration listed above, and for a primary concentration you must add the 9 units below.

9 units selected from:

Any Geography (GEOG) or other course offerings in resources, environment, or planning, with consent of the Social Science Coordinator.

Environmental Studies: 15-24 units

For a secondary concentration (15 units): after completing the Social Policy Core (12 units), you must take the 3 remaining units from the Science Core.

Social Policy Core

4 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Geographic analysis of humanity's interaction with the environment. Examines natural and human systems, resources, population, energy, and pollution. Develops an appreciation of the beauty, balance, and complexity of natural systems and human success in attaining harmony with them. Enhances awareness and perception of each individual's role in and with the environment. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (003873)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
This seminar is required of students minoring in Environmental Studies and is to be taken as the culminating course in the minor. The course integrates the cross-disciplinary elements of the minor, emphasizing the interplay among the scientific, social, legal, historical, and humanistic elements of the study of the environment. 3 hours seminar. (009080)
An analysis of the costs and benefits of environmental preservation. Systems for creating economic incentives for pollution abatement. Criteria for establishing optimum pollution abatement, including efficiency, safety, and sustainability standards. Impacts of population growth on global environmental problems. Alternative energy use patterns and their impact on energy markets and global environmental health. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002671)
Investigation and analysis of the political nature of the environmental crisis in the United States and the development of legal and administrative mechanisms for handling environmental problems. 3 hours lecture. (007596)

Science Core

3-8 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.
An examination of ecological principles and the impact of increasing population and technology upon the environment. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (001156)
Prerequisites: Completion of ELM requirement, Intermediate Algebra.
A survey of the principles of chemistry, primarily for students in agriculture, industry and technology, and pre-nursing. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001826)
Prerequisites: Second-year high school algebra; one year high school chemistry. (One year of high school physics and one year of high school mathematics past Algebra II are recommended.)
Principles of chemistry for students in science, medical, and related professions. Atomic structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, periodic table, gases, solids, liquids, solutions, and equilibrium. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001816)
Prerequisites: One course from GE Pathway Foundation Physical Sciences and one course from GE Pathway Foundation Life Sciences.
Human impact on life-support systems; use of physical and ecological principles in environmental management and protection; discussion of land use and its environmental impact; and an evaluation of human influence on natural cycles. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education Capstone course. (021331)

Applications

You must select at least two courses from one of the following three categories.

0-6 units selected from:

Natural Resources

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This internship is offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Students must register directly with a supervising faculty member. The internship provides service learning experience as a volunteer or supervisor in a campus or community environmental organization or agency. Each unit of credit requires a minimum of three hours of activity in the assigned role. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (003922)
Prerequisites: GEOG 304 or equivalent.
Analysis of local, regional, national, and international water resource projects, distributions, and characteristics. 3 hours seminar. (003948)
Prerequisites: One course from GE Pathway Foundation Physical Sciences and one course from GE Pathway Foundation Life Sciences.
Provides the non-major with a geologic approach to current environmental problems relating to the origin and use of energy, mineral, and water resources, and the causes and mitigations of geologic hazards. 3 hours discussion. (004071)
Prerequisites: One course from GE Pathway Foundation Physical Sciences.
Analysis of present and long-term global energy crises; coverage of scientific concepts needed to understand energy and its environmental interactions; in-depth examination of alternative energy sources and their environmental impact. 3 hours lecture. (004149)
Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; GEOS 330 or GEOS 380.
Water-resources, management plans of world; emphasis on California and Israeli plans. Water plans in primitive, agrarian, and industrial societies. Data gathering and interpretation, regulation of water resources, and control of water pollution. 3 hours lecture. (004168)
Prerequisites: CHEM 112; GEOS 330 or faculty permission; MATH 120; either PHYS 202B or PHYS 204C.
Physical principles, theory and analysis techniques for computer modeling in the geosciences. Methods of estimation and error analysis, boundary values and initial conditions, steady-state and time-dependent models. Emphasis on problems relating to air and water pollution and hydrologic cycle. 3 hours discussion. (004163)
How ecological factors, technology, and human values interact to determine available choices of food and its production. Consequences of these choices in terms of community structures, resource allocations, and stability of agro-ecosystems. This course is designed to be a component of the Upper-Division Theme on Cross-Cultural Exploration. Not intended for majors, but open to them. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004874)

Nature, Society, and Human Values

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course serves as an introduction to the evolutionary processes influencing human behavior grounded in the paleoanthropological study of foraging peoples and an examination of cross-cultural patterns in human behavior. Emphasis will be placed on an evolutionary ecological perspective where aspects of human adaptation are viewed as the result of long-term survival strategies. 3 hours seminar. (000570)
Surveys the relationships among disease, curing, culture, and environment. Topics include problems of adapting modern medicines to diverse cultures; explication of the social and cultural correlates of physical and mental health and disease; nutritional implications of culture change; anthropology contributions to health-policy decisions and makers in non-Western countries. 3 hours seminar. (000579)
Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.
This course is also offered as PHIL 322 .
Critically examines scientific and humanistic world views and sensibilities, directly applying these approaches to contemporary social and personal problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (001148)
Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.
This course is also offered as PHIL 322I .
Critically examines scientific and humanistic world views and sensibilities, directly applying these approaches to contemporary social and personal problems. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education course. (021254)
This internship is offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Students must register directly with a supervising faculty member. The internship provides service learning experience as a volunteer or supervisor in a campus or community environmental organization or agency. Each unit of credit requires a minimum of three hours of activity in the assigned role. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (003922)
Prerequisites: GEOG 101 and GEOG 102 or equivalents.
An analysis of the complex interactions between humans, plants, and animals in the restoration process. Includes the use of maps and other graphic material as well as reading, lecture, and discussion. Emphasis on how human activities can affect the distribution and abundance of various plant and animal species in both negative and positive ways. Restoration work on the Butte Creek Ecological Reserves and other similar sites provide a focus for class projects and discussion. 3 hours lecture. (003930)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
A regional and topical description of North America at selected time periods, including cultural groups, land tenure systems, settlement patterns, agriculture, exploration and mapping, resource use, urbanization, population and migrations, and present-day results. 3 hours discussion. (000412)
History of the attitudes, concepts, and public policy toward the American environment, including the natural, rural, and urban environments. Emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (004539)
Prerequisites: BIOL 342 or GEOS 130 or NSCI 343 or equivalent.
This course is also offered as EDCI 448 .
Experiential-oriented survey of methods and materials for teaching environmental concepts in schools, communities, nature centers, camps, and parks. Exposure to history, theory, philosophy, and goals of environmental education programs. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002778)

Law, Policy, and the Environment

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Explores the historical and contemporary global movements of people, commodities, technology and ideas. Surveys the impacts of colonial relationships on the contemporary world, post-colonialism and the rise of the development era, and contemporary trends resulting in the increased social and cultural integration and differentiation of individuals and groups around the world. 3 hours lecture. (000582)
The social and institutional frameworks, legislative bases, procedures, and practices of prehistoric and cultural resources management taught by means of case studies of legislative documents, management studies, and environmental impact reports. The investigation of selected resources and preparation of appropriate descriptive, evaluative, and management reports. 3 hours lecture. (000617)
Prerequisites: ECON 103.
An overview of the economics of government regulation with emphasis on the formulation of regulatory policy, alternative methods of regulation, and the economic impacts of such policy. Topics may include environmental regulation, energy conservation policy, consumer protection, antitrust policy, and a critical evaluation of market-based regulatory policy. 3 hours lecture. (002668)
This internship is offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Students must register directly with a supervising faculty member. The internship provides service learning experience as a volunteer or supervisor in a campus or community environmental organization or agency. Each unit of credit requires a minimum of three hours of activity in the assigned role. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (003922)
Prerequisites: GEOG 320 or equivalent.
Study of the legal antecedents to California environmental impact legislation; analysis of environmental review procedures, environmental research, preparation and evaluation of EIRs, and conditional negative declarations. 3 hours discussion. (003949)
An overview of the relationship of people and nature; the impact of environmental conditions, such as water and air pollution, solid wastes, food contamination, vectors, radiation, noise, light, which cause deleterious effects on people's physical, mental, and social well-being. Individual and collective consumer intervention in environmental health problems. 3 hours discussion. (001606)
Review and analysis of the present and changing nature of planning and land-use control law, particularly as the law is applied in California. 3 hours seminar. (007605)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
See description below. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (007621)

Permission of Environmental Studies Coordinator also required.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course views the environment as shaped by human societies, where competing values and interests play out. Controversial issues such as population growth, pollution, rapid climate change, water and land use, and noxious facility siting in minority, working class, and poor communities are examined. Attention is directed to public policies, corporate practices, and social movements and individual habits that promote solutions. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (008963)

Family Relations: 15-24 units

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This capstone seminar integrates interdisciplinary approaches to family studies through the examination of topics such as cohabitation, marriage, alternative family forms, parenting, sexuality, child development, personality, gender, and aging. Family policy issues are also emphasized. 3 hours seminar. (009078)
Prerequisites: CHLD 250 or CHLD 252 or CHLD 255 or PSYC 355, faculty permission.
This course is an advanced study of the interpersonal relationships among family members. Topics of reading and discussion include theories and research on family structure and function, family crises, child raising patterns, family finances, and other related topics as per instructor choice. 3 hours discussion. (001462)

For a secondary concentration you must complete at least one course in each of the following sections: Child Development, Marriage and Family, and Sex Roles.

Aging

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Exploration of changing health status and needs in later life. Discussion of body system changes, bio-psycho-social influences on elders' health, health enhancement strategies, common health problems, treatment, and prevention. Also addresses drug use and abuse, sexuality, chronic illness, use of health delivery systems, including long-term care. 3 hours lecture. (001569)
Studies the changes people face as they age in modern society, as individual social beings and as members of a larger society; how social change (economic, political, technological) affects older people in their aging patterns; emphasis is on the social aspects of problems and prospects for America's elders. 3 hours lecture. (001571)
An introduction to the psychological processes and phenomena associated with middle and older adulthood. 3 hours lecture. (004457)
How is the human life course, shaped by society and historical time periods? This course examines the dynamic nature between individual lives, social generations, and social change. Cultural and structural influences on personal identities are considered, as well as life transitions and aging. 3 hours lecture. (008992)
Examines major social policies, legislation, programs, models of service delivery, and funding related to the needs and concerns of older adults living in the US. Barriers to service availability and delivery to older populations-at-risk, and types of advocacy efforts to promote policy change are addressed. 3 hours lecture. (001570)

Child Development

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Registration in CHLD 251 for Child Development majors and minors.
A study of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of children from conception through adolescence. The course examines genetic, biological, and environmental influences including cross-cultural issues. Scheduled observation in the Associated Students Child Development Laboratory (ASCDL) is met through enrollment in CHLD 251. 3 hours discussion. (001440)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Designed for Nursing, Liberal Studies, Communication Sciences & Disorders, and other non-Child Development majors, this course studies the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of children from conception through adolescence. The course explains genetic, biological, and environmental influences including cross-cultural issues. Scheduled observations are included. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (001442)
Physical, mental, social, and emotional factors of human growth and development from infancy through adolescence. Supervised experience working with children is strongly encouraged. 3 hours lecture. (007925)

Marriage and Family

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This is an introductory course to marriage and family, including psychological, physiological, and social aspects of close personal relationships. The topics include dating, courtship, marriage, family life, dual career marriages, single parenting, and other contemporary issues. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (001443)
The interrelationship of psychological, physiological, and cultural factors in marriage and family relations. 3 hours lecture. (007937)
This course examines the family as an institution and as a personal and intimate arena of meaning and interaction. With an emphasis on the U.S. and their own experiences, students examine issues of race/ethnicity, sex/gender, and social class; historical changes in family structure and function; and power relations within the family and society at large. 3 hours lecture. (008961)

Personality

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Introduction to the nature and development of personality, with emphasis on the normal adult, including theories of personality, techniques of assessment, and a survey of current research. 3 hours lecture. (007944)
This course explores the relationship between the individual and society by focusing on how people create and sustain their daily lives. The emphasis is on interacations with others, and the effect of individual behavior upon group dynamics. Socialization, identities and the self, emotions, conformity, and communication are explored. 3 hours lecture. (008994)

Sex Roles

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Overview of human sexuality, including psychosexual development, gender roles, reproductive system, pregnancy and childbirth, contraception, abortion, sexually transmitted diseases inlcuding HIV/AIDS, relationships, sexual orientation, sex and the law, sexually explicit materials, and sexual dysfunction. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (004384)
Prerequisites: BIOL 104.
Survey of issues relating to human sexuality, including gender, sexual response, societal and individual value sytems, sexual orientation, cross-cultural comparisons, reproduction, and disease prevention. Analysis of sexuality education principles, programs, national and state guidelines, and controversial issues. Exploration of personal values and skills related to sexuality education. 3 hours discussion. (001609)
This course uncovers the complexity and impact of sexuality on our experiences and on broader social life. Addressing biological, psychological, and cultural aspects, this course examines how society influences cultural and individual sexual meanings, identities, expresssions, and controversies. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (008937)

Women and Family

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Important issues, theories, and research related to the psychology of women are examined. Common stereotypes, myths, and typical societal expectations are explored in terms of biological, social, psychological, and development determinants. Additionally, the social construction of gender categories, female sexuality, victimization of women, mental health of women, and issues related to education, work, and family are examined. Information in this course should serve as a catalyst for constructive change by revealing deficiencies in psychological research and theories relevant to gender, sexuality, cultural, and ethnic issues. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007907)
This course is also offered as WMST 230 .
Taking an in-depth look, this course explores women's lives in today's world across categories of class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, disability, and age. Students also discuss such topics as gender, body politics, violence against women, poverty, religion, and power as they relate to women. Special attention is given to social activism and emerging policies here in the U.S. and elsewhere. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (008968)

Geography: 15-24 units

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: High school biology, chemistry, or physics is recommended.
This course is a survey of the basic processes that determine flows of energy through the atmosphere and examines the subsequent interactions among water, landforms, soil, and vegetation that create and modify the surface of the earth. Students develop a recognition of landscape patterns, as well as an understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological principles and functions that create those patterns, in order to understand the natural environment in which we live and the role of humans affecting that environment. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education course. (003857)
Survey of human populations and activities, with an emphasis upon how social, economic, political, and religious institutions influence interrelationships with the physical environment. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003859)
A systematic survey of human economic activities. Analysis of resource exploitation and use, including agriculture, extractive activities, industry, commerce, and service functions. Recommended for business and liberal arts majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003871)
Geographic analysis of humanity's interaction with the environment. Examines natural and human systems, resources, population, energy, and pollution. Develops an appreciation of the beauty, balance, and complexity of natural systems and human success in attaining harmony with them. Enhances awareness and perception of each individual's role in and with the environment. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (003873)
Analysis of various field techniques and tools employed by geographers, and supervised application of field techniques in geography. Written and oral presentation of Field Survey. 6 hours activity. (003939)

0-9 units selected from:

Any Geography (GEOG) course offerings.

Gerontology: 15-24 units

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as MCGS 328 .
Ethnic groups in the U.S. face many health problems. This course focuses on those problems which affect the four largest ethnic groups in the U.S.: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, and Asian Americans. The effects of history, health beliefs and practices, and socioeconomic status on the health of these ethnic populations are addressed. Current and potential strategies to improve health care delivery to these groups are explored. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved US Diversity course. (004448)
Exploration of changing health status and needs in later life. Discussion of body system changes, bio-psycho-social influences on elders' health, health enhancement strategies, common health problems, treatment, and prevention. Also addresses drug use and abuse, sexuality, chronic illness, use of health delivery systems, including long-term care. 3 hours lecture. (001569)
An introduction to the psychological processes and phenomena associated with middle and older adulthood. 3 hours lecture. (004457)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of RECR 200, or faculty permission.
Methods and skills to effectively provide recreation services for elders in a variety of settings; current issues and problems involved in providing leisure and recreation services for the elders; examination of the value of recreation activities in the lives of elders with regard to relatives and friends as well as oneself; resources for providing leisure programs and pre-retirement planning. Requires out-of-class activity with senior programs. Helpful to all disciplines working with senior citizens. 3 hours lecture. (004440)
Examines major social policies, legislation, programs, models of service delivery, and funding related to the needs and concerns of older adults living in the US. Barriers to service availability and delivery to older populations-at-risk, and types of advocacy efforts to promote policy change are addressed. 3 hours lecture. (001570)

0-9 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Studies the changes people face as they age in modern society, as individual social beings and as members of a larger society; how social change (economic, political, technological) affects older people in their aging patterns; emphasis is on the social aspects of problems and prospects for America's elders. 3 hours lecture. (001571)
Prerequisites: BIOL 104; NFSC 100 or NFSC 340.
A survey of nutritional needs from conception to death, including the relationship of nutrients to health and well-being and factors which affect food selection of different population groups. 3 hours discussion. (004298)
Students participate in and monitor the results of a training program in swimming, running, weight training, cycling, or aerobics. Lectures explore the body's response to exercise and how to best exercise. Information and guidelines on how to begin or maintain a program of healthy and enjoyable exercise are presented. Topics discussed include the values of exercise, the body's responses to exercise and training, fitness assessment, exercise prescription, exercise and the environment, exercise for special populations, and sports nutrition. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (006967)
A study of the religious, ethical, spiritual, psychological, and socio-cultural dimensions of dying, death, and afterlife. Reading and discussion of issues surrounding dying (dying as one's last career, patient-centered approaches, spirit/body relationships); death (definitions, religious meanings, ritual practices); and afterlife (religious conceptions, relation to the human quest for meaning). 3 hours seminar.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004443)
How is the human life course, shaped by society and historical time periods? This course examines the dynamic nature between individual lives, social generations, and social change. Cultural and structural influences on personal identities are considered, as well as life transitions and aging. 3 hours lecture. (008992)
Prerequisites: Junior standing, the approval of the Social Science Program Coordinator, faculty permission.
This course is an internship offered for 1.0-15.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. The internship experience is designed to supplement academic work in social science and to provide students with occupational experience. 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (009084)

See Internship Policy below.

Note: Students wishing to be awarded the Gerontology Certificate must complete a primary concentration, use HCSV 489 and HCSV 490 as part of their 9 units of electives, and have a grade point average of 2.5 overall in their certificate classes.

Health and Human Services: 15-24 units

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An examination of the health care industry and its role in fulfilling national health needs. Topics include national health insurance, health financing, and resource allocation. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002667)
Provides knowledge and skills to administer health organizations and programs. Concepts of planning, organizational behavior, and management applicable to the administration of health organizations and programs are addressed. Major approaches to management, motivation, leadership, decision making, supervision, and budgeting are presented. 3 hours seminar. (001582)
Provides an overview of the U.S. healthcare delivery system from historical, organizational, financial, and administrative perspectives. Analyzes current health issues, such as cost, access, and quality of care. 3 hours seminar. (001583)
Knowledge and skill development in writing grant proposals for health and community services. Skills in researching government, foundation, and corporate funding opportunities. Diversifying nonprofit income through other fundraising strategies. 3 hours seminar. (001618)
The history and philosophy of criminal justice in America; recapitulation of the system and how it disproportionately impacts different groups in America; identifying the various sub-systems, role expectations, and their interrelationships; theories of crime, punishment, and rehabilitation; ethics, education, and training for professionalism in the criminal justice system. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (001563)
This course identifies groups within American society which have a high risk of disenfranchisement. Societal responses established to reduce the impact of inequitable distribution of goods, services, and opportunities based on economic, medical, educational, generational, gender, and legal scarcity are studied. Issues are examined from historical and contemporary perspectives. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (009411)

0-9 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: CMST 131, CMST 330, CMST 331 with a grade of C- or higher.
The study and survey of major content areas of organizational communication theory and research. Contemporary theories related to organizational environments are reviewed with an emphasis on technology in organizations and its relationship to communication process. Content areas include ethics, networks, diversity and cultures, changing employer-employee relations, feedback, groups, home-workplace tensions, and various emerging topics in the field. 3 hours discussion. (002222)
Prerequisites: HCSV 431.
This course is also offered as POLS 405 .
An analysis of the political forces, both private and public, which have an impact upon the health industry in the United States. Focusing on problems related to the delivery of health care, the course will cover such issues as availability, accessibility, appropriateness, acceptance, accounting, and alternatives. 3 hours seminar. (001587)
Prerequisites: POLS 460A or concurrent enrollment.
A survey of the processes of recruiting and managing personnel in the public service. The philosophy of public personnel administration, organization for personnel administration, history and evolution of the career system, comparative modern structures, and general processes of personnel. Both traditional and behavioral literature. 3 hours lecture. (007593)
Corequisites: SWRK 200 for majors only.
Using a systems framework and selected human behavior theories across the lifespan, the biological, social, psychological, and cultural influences on individuals, families, and groups are investigated. Particular emphasis is given to ethnic and cultural diversity and promoting student self-reflection across generations and cultural competence. 3 hours lecture. (009416)

Health Science: 15-24 units

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Overview of human sexuality, including psychosexual development, gender roles, reproductive system, pregnancy and childbirth, contraception, abortion, sexually transmitted diseases inlcuding HIV/AIDS, relationships, sexual orientation, sex and the law, sexually explicit materials, and sexual dysfunction. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (004384)
Analyzes fundamental principles upon which school, community, and population health are based. The contributions of federal, state, and local organizations to national goals for health promotion and disease prevention are examined. Explores fundamental social, political, organizational, and behavioral aspects of public health in school, community, and worksite settings. 3 hours lecture. (001575)
An overview of the relationship of people and nature; the impact of environmental conditions, such as water and air pollution, solid wastes, food contamination, vectors, radiation, noise, light, which cause deleterious effects on people's physical, mental, and social well-being. Individual and collective consumer intervention in environmental health problems. 3 hours discussion. (001606)
An overview of the use and abuse of alcohol, prescription and street drugs, and their personal and societal consequences on the young adult, the family, and society. Historical perspectives, legal issues, and decision-making skills regarding drug use will also be addressed. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (004435)
Prerequisites: One lower-division course in biological sciences.
Analyzes and evaluates current practices and theories regarding nutrition and its relationship to athletics, weight control, and physical exercise. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (004288)

0-9 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: BIOL 104 is strongly recommended.
Examines the major chronic and communicable diseases, including cause, prevention, and treatment strategies. Behaviors that promote health and reduce premature death and disease are also addressed. 3 hours lecture. (001574)
Analysis of historical and current health problems in the world: population dynamics, vital statistics, global disease patterns, and variations among nations and cultures. Examination of contributing social, psychological, physical, governmental, and cultural factors affecting disease. Efforts toward health promotion and disease prevention, including international programs. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (004412)
Examination of major health care consumer issues from historical and contemporary perspectives. Discussion of cost, availability, and quality of health care and their relationship to political and economic activities. Identification of national, regional, and local health trends affecting consumers. Analysis of individual and collective consumer strategies. 3 hours lecture. (004445)
This course is also offered as MCGS 328 .
Ethnic groups in the U.S. face many health problems. This course focuses on those problems which affect the four largest ethnic groups in the U.S.: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, and Asian Americans. The effects of history, health beliefs and practices, and socioeconomic status on the health of these ethnic populations are addressed. Current and potential strategies to improve health care delivery to these groups are explored. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved US Diversity course. (004448)
This course is also offered as WMST 368 .
This course represents an overview of health care issues faced by women throughout the life cycle. The course begins an examination of scientific inquiry and the study of disease in women. Then, using sociological, political, and behavioral sciences, the roles, rights, and responsibilities of women in the health care system are assessed. The course concludes with a biological review of the female body and specific health care problems common to women. This course encompasses a woman-centered philosophy which encourages women's active participation in their health care decisions. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (004381)
Addresses major health issues affecting the child, including, but not limited to, health promotion and disease prevention, nutrition, substance use and abuse, and sexuality. Overview of health instruction framework for California public schools. Fulfills the state health education requirement for a preliminary teaching credential. 3 hours discussion. (004393)
Addresses major health issues affecting the adolescent, including, but not limited to, health promotion and disease prevention, nutrition, substance use and abuse, and sexuality. Fulfills the state health education requirement for a preliminary teaching credential. 3 hours discussion. (004394)
Prerequisite: HCSV 369 recommended.
Philosophical framework, organization, administration, and legal aspects of the school health program. Development of prevention and intervention strategies for major health problems affecting K-12 students, with emphasis on cultural sensitivity, at-risk youth, and community/school partnerships. 3 hours seminar. (004466)
Exploration of changing health status and needs in later life. Discussion of body system changes, bio-psycho-social influences on elders' health, health enhancement strategies, common health problems, treatment, and prevention. Also addresses drug use and abuse, sexuality, chronic illness, use of health delivery systems, including long-term care. 3 hours lecture. (001569)

For students in the credential program, HCSV 265, HCSV 370, HCSV 451, HCSV 462, and NFSC 303 satisfy the requirements for a supplemental authorization in Health.

History: 15-24 units

6-9 units selected from:

Any European History course offerings.

6-9 units selected from:

Any American History course offerings.

3-6 units selected from:

Any African, Asian, Latin American, Middle Eastern, or World History course offerings.

International Relations: 15-24 units

12-18 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Introduction to the United Nations, its procedures and current issues on its agenda to prepare delegates to participate in the a Model United Nations Conference held during the fall semester. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (007498)
Prerequisites: POLS 340A.
Individual and group research on an assigned country and its U.N. policy positions plus mock session activities to prepare delegates to represent that country at the National Model United Nations Conference held in New York City during the spring semester. Either attendance at the New York City conference or a 15-page research paper on a U.N. agenda topic is required. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (007499)
Concepts in international politics, with emphasis on the analysis of contemporary global issues. Recommended for secondary teachers. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007500)
Prerequisites: POLS 341.
Introduction to methods, objectives, and techniques of scientific study of international politics. Analysis of selected examples of behavioral research in international politics. Examples will normally include cross-cultural research, comparative elites, global and regional political change, events data analysis, war and peace studies. 3 hours discussion. (007501)
Course analyzes post-World War II American foreign policy. It examines the origins and development of the cold war, with attention to nuclear capabilities, the growth of national security bureaucracy, and the impact on American society. Special attention is given to the decision-making process as well as to theories of personality, organizational behavior, and the political process as these affect the cold war basis of American foreign policy. 3 hours lecture. (007503)
This course is a simulation on selected topics in international relations. 3 hours independent study. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (007512)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
Individual consultation with faculty in working on special projects, reading lists, or areas of deficiency. 3 hours independent study. Credit/no credit grading. (007519)
This course is an independent study of special problems offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (007523)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, POLS 341.
Analysis of the dynamics of international politics, with emphasis on the following theories and concepts: images, decision-making, power, the state, nationalism, balance of power, international system, war, alliances, and imperialism. International Relations majors: 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (007559)
Analysis of the development and activities of various types of international organizations, including the United Nations, multinational corporations, OPEC, the Common Market, the IMF, the World Bank, and such non-governmental organizations as Amnesty International and Greenpeace. 3 hours lecture. (007561)
This course is also offered as INST 446D .
3 hours lecture. (004873)
A multi-dimensional and cross-disciplinary study of the historical and contemporary phenomenon of terrorism and counterterrorist policy. Focus is on terrorism as different from war, the sources and practitioners of terrorism, and the multiple rationales for its use. Study will include both domestic and international terrorism, private and state as well as national and international counterterrorist policy. Particular attention on the threat of terrorism to liberal democracy and development of liberal democratic counterterrorist policy. Selection choice for the Option in Political Affairs. 3 hours lecture. (007575)
This course is a seminar on selected topics in international relations. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (007576)

No more than 6 units of POLS 340, POLS 340B, POLS 391E, POLS 397, POLS 399, and POLS 498 may be counted.

3-6 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as AFAM 100 .
An interdisciplinary approach to modern and traditional aspects of African life in the fields of history, geography, politics, ethnography, and socio-economic development. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (000134)
Series of in-depth studies, both thematic and topical, concerning major issues and current problems in sub-Saharan Africa, employing an interdisciplinary approach. Topics covered include South Africa, and revolution and ecological crises in Africa. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (000146)
This course is also offered as AAST 110 .
This interdisciplinary course offers students an introduction to some of the many issues facing Asian nations today, grounded in an understanding of the historical, cultural, religious, and philosophical influences that underlie these challenges. The course examines the role of individuals in creating societal change in Asia through such things as political advocacy, cultural innovation, technological invention, the generation of literature, economic decision-making, military force, corruption, and other methods of influence. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021219)
This course is also offered as LAST 357 .
Study of the physical environment, human settlement, development, and modern problems of the nations of Latin America. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021143)
A survey of the history, geography, culture, and society of Latin America. This course is designed to provide students who are majoring in Latin American Studies, as well as General Education students, with an initial orientation in the study of Latin America on an interdisciplinary basis. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (015750)
This course is also offered as GEOG 357 .
Study of the physical environment, human settlement, development, and modern problems of the nations of Latin America. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021143)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, LAST 110.
An in-depth, interdisciplinary seminar that examines selected topics in Latin American culture and society, past and present, through critical reading of, and commentary on, recent scholarship devoted to the region. Readings may include Spanish language sources. Topics vary by semester. Required for majors and minors. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (005384)
The political dynamics of selected developing countries. Major emphasis is on problems of poverty, colonialism, comparative political structures and behavior, imperialism, and international relations. The course also focuses on tensions in the political culture between traditional and non-traditional values in developing societies. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (015554)
Examination of the international political economy and process of development. Specific focus is on the crisis of the world capitalist system and the international and national attempts to restructure levels of that system. The question of development is discussed from various ideological perspectives, along with the political-economic implications of industrialization and the debt crisis in developing countries. Case studies on the political economy of developing countries are offered. 3 hours lecture. (007530)
An examination of the politics of Asia. Emphasis may vary among East, South-East, and South Asia. The study of the response of Asian political systems to the dual challenges of modernization and Western pressure will be combined with an analysis of contemporary political institutions and events. 3 hours lecture. (007535)
Analysis of the international political economy and industrial- post-industrial societies. Specific focus on the internationalization of capitalism and major institutions of the international political economy in the post-Cold War era; the competing models of North Amerian, European, and Asian political economies; trade, investment and security issues among industrial nations; and relationship of industrial nations' policy to the political economy of the developing world. 3 hours lecture. (007539)
Study in political science related to specialized subjects of topical and current interest. Intensive reading. Topics may be offered in American Government, Comparative Government, Political Behavior, Political Theory, International Relations, Public Law, or Public Administration. 1 hour seminar. (007665)

Multicultural and Gender Studies: 15-24 units

For a primary concentration: After completing the core, you must take 6 units from Intercultural Study, 6 units from Gender Study, 3 units from Focused Study, and 6 units from any other African American Studies (AFAM), American Indian Studies (AIST), Asian American Studies (AAST), or Chicano Studies (CHST) course offerings selected in consultation with the program coordinator. 15 upper-division units are required.

For a secondary concentration: After completing the core, you must take 3 units from Intercultural Study, 3 units from Gender Study, 3 units from Focused Study, and 3 units of electives from any other African American Studies (AFAM), American Indian Studies (AIST), Asian American Studies (AAST), or Chicano Studies (CHST) course offerings selected in consultation with the program coordinator. 9 upper-division units are required.

Core

1 course required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An introduction to the concepts, terminology, and issues in multicultural and gender studies, including exploration of America's multicultural history, gender as an element of culture, and contemporary issues in the field. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (002602)

Intercultural Study

1-2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Focus is on the problems of communication between cultural groupings inside and outside of the U.S. Various historical and political contexts in which intercultural communication occurs are examined. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021193)
This course is also offered as RELS 224 .
This course covers the religions that inform America's ethnic minorities, and the historical, cultural, and social experiences and values of Native American, Hispanic-American, Arab-American, African-American, and Asian-American minority groups. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021198)
This course is also offered as HCSV 328 .
Ethnic groups in the U.S. face many health problems. This course focuses on those problems which affect the four largest ethnic groups in the U.S.: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, and Asian Americans. The effects of history, health beliefs and practices, and socioeconomic status on the health of these ethnic populations are addressed. Current and potential strategies to improve health care delivery to these groups are explored. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved US Diversity course. (004448)

Gender Study

1-2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Using both cognitive and experiential models, this course explores the relationships between gender and communication. Discussions focus on such topics as self-perceptions and images of men and women, language used by and about men and women, self-disclosure and self-assertion as communicative acts, gender differences in information processing and non-verbal communication, private and public contexts for gender communication, and gender communication in organizations. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (021189)
This course introduces health education theory, curricula, resources, and marketing techniques for use in school and community settings. Students plan, develop, implement, and evaluate effective health education and promotion programs. Students practice professional health education techniques while working with a local organization to implement a community health education. 3 hours lecture. (001613)
This course is also offered as NURS 326Z .
This course explores the physiological mechanisms of disease and resistance, social definitions of disease, and gender-related factors in research, diagnosis, treatment, and adaptation to disease. Diseases are usually studied and described in generic terms without regard to gender; however, it is apparent that substantial differences exist in male and female susceptibility, manifestations, and responses to many diseases; just as significantly, society's responses to disease are clearly influenced by gender issues. These issues are explored, through the perspectives of both natural and social sciences. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education Capstone course. (021361)
An exploration of how science and culture have affected people's understandings of gender and sexuality, in both Western and non-Western cultures, from ancient times to the present. 3 hours lecture. (005642)
This course is also offered as HIST 335 .
Focus on the role gender plays in shaping and defining American history, from colonial times to the present. Analysis of relations between sexes, the family, and the struggle by women to achieve civil rights and social reform. The roles of race and class, and the rise of feminism. 3 hours lecture. (004541)

Focused Study

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as SOCI 152 .
This course examines the Asian experience in the U.S. over the last 150 year by focusing on the experiences of different Asian ethnic groups. The focus is on early arrival and settlement, and contemporary issues in Asian American communities, including immigration, racism, and Asian American identity. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000003)
Introduces the aims and objectives of African American Studies. A critical examination of the African American experience and its antecedents. This includes an assessment of how the dominant society impacts African Americans, including such factors as racism, poverty, and the current social/economic status of African Americans. Africa's contributions to the world are included. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000136)
Introduction to socio-cultural development of the American Indian in modern times and the background for present-day conditions. Attention given to contemporary Indian affairs and problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000375)
This course is also offered as SOCI 157 .
This course explores contemporary issues affecting Chicanos in the United States, including cultural values, social organization, urbanization, gender, and socio-economics. Attention is given to how family, religion, and immigration experiences play upon the lifestyles and values held by Chicanas and Chicanos. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (001973)

Electives

1-2 courses selected from:

Any other African American Studies (AFAM), American Indian Studies (AIST), Asian American Studies (AAST), or Chicano Studies (CHST) course offerings selected in consultation with the program coordinator.

Political Science: 15-24 units

3 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
An introduction to the discipline of political science, with emphasis on the major controversy of substance and method therein. Should be taken at the beginning of the junior year. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (007495)
Concepts in international politics, with emphasis on the analysis of contemporary global issues. Recommended for secondary teachers. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007500)
Prerequisites: POLS 331 or permission of instructor.
Investigation of methodology and the techniques used in the study of political phenomena, with emphasis on the construction of appropriate research designs, data collection, and analysis. 3 hours discussion. (007542)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Considers tensions between the democratic and republican claims in formative periods: Puritan, Revolutionary, Constitution, Jacksonian, and Civil War. Addresses modern implications. Uses primary sources and novels. 3 hours lecture. (007551)
Considers competing democratic and republican claims in the context of social Darwinism, Populism, Progressivism, New Deal, and Post-World War II. Uses primary sources and novels. 3 hours lecture. (007554)
This course is also offered as PHIL 434 .
The classical roots of western political philosophy and their relationship to contemporary political theory. 3 hours seminar. (007279)
This course is also offered as PHIL 437 .
An extended discussion of the nature of anarchy, corporatism, oligarchy, classical liberalism, radical liberalism, democratic socialism, communism, and fascism, with a continued focus on these political cultures and their ideological expressions in contemporary politics. 3 hours seminar. (007281)
This course is also offered as PHIL 438 .
The philosophical nature and origins of law. Topics to be examined include theories of law, justice, the relationship of law to morality, natural law, responsibility, punishment, and other basic concepts. Approach is both theoretical and via case studies. 3 hours lecture. (007282)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Analysis of the history and development of the American federal system and the role of state and local governments, with special emphasis directed to the government and politics of California. Among the major topics considered: the state and local political systems; the political environment; party, interest group, citizen, and media inputs; and current problems and changing functions affecting state and local governments. 3 hours lecture. (007524)
Prerequisites: POLS 402 and POLS 473 are recommended.
Course will focus on the lobbying process at the state and national level and will consider the role interest groups play within the American-state governmental milieu. 3 hours lecture. (007526)
A study of the learning of political attitudes; the role of the family, school, peer group, and others in the political socialization process; the process of accommodation or non-accommodation to the value patterns of society and ultimate political behavior. 3 hours lecture. (007545)
Critical examination of the process of policy formation in American governments. Relationship of executive, legislative, and judicial branches in policy formation. A significant policy area will be examined, with emphasis on both statutory and constitutional bases and the social/political factors influencing policy development. 3 hours lecture. (007607)
A comparative analysis of the executive component of government. Emphasis on the national executive, selected state executives, and selected executives in other nations. 3 hours lecture. (007609)
Analysis of the structure, processes, and behavior in legislative bodies. Emphasis on a comparison of selected legislative bodies. 3 hours lecture. (007610)

0-9 units selected from:

Any upper-division Political Science (POLS) course offering, including at least one course from four of the six major areas: American Government, Political Theory and Methodology, Comparative Government, International Relations, Public Law, and Public Administration. For the secondary concentration, students should select at least one course from three of the above six areas.

Psychology: 15-24 units

Core

1 course required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Introduction to concepts and problems in psychology. Topics include perception, learning, development, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior, and biological and social bases of behavior. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007881)

Personal Growth

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as MCGS 341 .
This course focuses on the importance and various influences of culture on human behavior. Beginning with an examination of theoretical definitions of culture, the course covers a broad range of research that highlights the contributions of cross-cultural psychology to the understanding of human behavior within and between cultures. In addition, conceptual, methodological, and practical issues in cross-cultural research and applications are covered. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (005638)
Important issues, theories, and research related to the psychology of women are examined. Common stereotypes, myths, and typical societal expectations are explored in terms of biological, social, psychological, and development determinants. Additionally, the social construction of gender categories, female sexuality, victimization of women, mental health of women, and issues related to education, work, and family are examined. Information in this course should serve as a catalyst for constructive change by revealing deficiencies in psychological research and theories relevant to gender, sexuality, cultural, and ethnic issues. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007907)
Introduction to the nature and development of personality, with emphasis on the normal adult, including theories of personality, techniques of assessment, and a survey of current research. 3 hours lecture. (007944)
Examination of the nature of prejudice and hate and their contribution to societal violence. How prejudice and hatred affect personal, family, and group behavior are considered in a context of understanding factors that contribute to their development. Strategies for reducing the prevalence of prejudice, hatred, and violence in our contemporary culture are evaluated. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (007908)
The interrelationship of psychological, physiological, and cultural factors in marriage and family relations. 3 hours lecture. (007937)

For a primary concentration, take two courses from each of the three areas below. For a secondary concentration, take one course from each of the three areas below.

Developmental

1-2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Students will examine a variety of issues which are of concern to persons interested in children. The topics will range from health care issues to toy selection. Emphasis will be on optimum individual and collective outcomes. Psychological perspectives will be emphasized, but the effects of historical, societal, and biological factors will also be explored. 3 hours lecture. (007914)
Examination of psychological factors involved in the learning processes of children. 3 hours lecture. (007884)
An introduction to the psychological processes and phenomena associated with middle and older adulthood. 3 hours lecture. (004457)
Physical, mental, social, and emotional factors of human growth and development from infancy through adolescence. Supervised experience working with children is strongly encouraged. 3 hours lecture. (007925)
Prerequisites: Recommended: PSYC 355 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently).
Study of current concepts, principles, and issues related to exceptional development. The focus is on children with various exeptionalities, e.g., behavior disorders, learning disabilities, communication disorders, physical impairments, motor and neurological impairments, and gifts or talents, to gain a better understanding of human diversity. Exceptional children are studied within the context of their families, as well as emphasizing the support services necessary to facilitate optimum development. 3 hours lecture. (007947)

Cognition/Biopsychology

1-2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course explores the fundamental relationships between brain function, mental states and consciousness, and human behavior. Attention is given to the influence of brain research on artifical intelligence, neural networks, and computer technology, and to the current metaphor of brain as computer. The course focus is on basic brain processes involved in sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, learning and memory, and language and consciousness. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007919)
This course provides an introduction to the field of health psychology which is the field within psychology devoted to understanding psychological influences on how people stay healthy, why they become ill, and how they respond when they do get ill. Topics include a study of health psychology as a profession, the bio-psychosocial model of health, health belief models and human behavior, health-compromising and health-enhancing behaviors, cognitive-behavioral approaches to behavior change, stress and coping, personality and health, and psychological issues in heart disease, cancer, AIDS, and other diseases. 3 hours discussion. (007975)
A review of the major theories, phenomena, and research associated with the structure and function of the sensory and perceptual systems. Primary emphasis is on the visual and auditory systems, but gustation, olfaction, and skin perception are also reviewed. 3 hours lecture. (007985)
This course is also offered as PHIL 363 .
This course examines the history of two competing approaches to psychology, and it evaluates their philosophical and scientific merits. Implications for contemporary debates in psychology are discussed. 3 hours lecture. (007213)
Prerequisites: PSYC 321 or PSYC 324 or any course which has covered basic brain anatomy, or faculty permission.
Course examines the behavioral changes which accompany certain known damages to the human brain. Topics include the neuropsychology of language, emotions, memory, learning, movement, personality, aggression, cerebral dominance, neuropsychological assessment, clinical syndromes following head trauma and stroke, developmental learning disorders, and disorders of aging, including Alzheimer's Disease. 3 hours discussion. (007978)
Prerequisites: Necessary background for specific internship.
This course is an internship offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. This course provides directed experience in agencies, institutions, or work setting appropriate to the application of psychological background and training. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (007988)

Applied

1-2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A survey of the principles and theories of learning. Examples of the applications of these will be given. 3 hours discussion. (007928)
Introduction to the study, definition, and classification of deviant behavior, including experimental psychopathology, psychodiagnostic methods, and psychotherapeutic procedures. 3 hours lecture. (007939)
Prerequisites: PSYC 381 or PSYC 382, senior or graduate standing, faculty permission.
Theory of individual and family counseling and laboratory practice in individual counseling. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007976)

Public Administration: 15-24 units

3 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Analysis of the history and development of the American federal system and the role of state and local governments, with special emphasis directed to the government and politics of California. Among the major topics considered: the state and local political systems; the political environment; party, interest group, citizen, and media inputs; and current problems and changing functions affecting state and local governments. 3 hours lecture. (007524)
Executive function in government; survey of the principles of administrative organization, personnel management, financial administration, administrative law, administrative policies. Problems and trends in government as a career. 3 hours lecture. (007592)
Prerequisites: POLS 460A or concurrent enrollment.
An intensive examination of the theory and research on organizational design, with an emphasis on applications of the theories. Focus is on how organizations develop structures to meet various internal (e.g., size, technology) and external (e.g., stakeholders, uncertainty) demands. 3 hours lecture. (007597)

For a secondary concentration you must complete one course in the Public Policy and Methods areas.

Methods

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
An introduction to the discipline of political science, with emphasis on the major controversy of substance and method therein. Should be taken at the beginning of the junior year. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (007495)
Prerequisites: POLS 331 or permission of instructor.
Investigation of methodology and the techniques used in the study of political phenomena, with emphasis on the construction of appropriate research designs, data collection, and analysis. 3 hours discussion. (007542)

Public Policy

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Critical examination of the process of policy formation in American governments. Relationship of executive, legislative, and judicial branches in policy formation. A significant policy area will be examined, with emphasis on both statutory and constitutional bases and the social/political factors influencing policy development. 3 hours lecture. (007607)
Prerequisites: POLS 421, POLS 471A.
An examination of the approaches, models, methods, and concepts of public policy analysis, with special emphasis on program evaluation, research methodologies, implementation problems, and policy evaluation models. Recommended for political science and public administration majors and minors. 3 hours lecture. (007608)

1 course required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: 3.0 cumulative GPA and faculty permission.
Work experience in selected governmental agencies supervised by faculty members and the staff of the cooperating agencies. Public Administration majors must take POLS 489A for at least 2 units. Public Administration students may substitute POLS 489P or POLS 493. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (007614)

See Internship Policy below.

6 units selected from:

Any Political Science (POLS) course offerings.

Sociology: 15-24 units

Core Program

3 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course helps organize thinking about societies in general, the society we inhabit, and our place within it. Underlying questions are: Why do people have different values? Why do people act differently? Why is there inequality? And why and how does society; its values and norms, institutions, and groups influence our behavior. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (008933)
This course examines the emergence of classical sociological theory in its socio-historical context, with emphasis on the foundational ideas of Marx. Weber, and Durkheim that continue to influence sociological theorizing today. 3 hours lecture. (008955)
This course explores the logic and styles of sociological research, focusing on the methods of formulating research problems, the design of social research, and techniques for ensuring the quality and validity of data and conclusions. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches to research are examined. 3 hours seminar. (008969)

For a secondary concentration in Sociology: after completing the Core, you must complete 6 units of any SOCI offerings.

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as MCGS 330 .
This course examines gender as a social construct and its influences on men and women in families, school, work, politics, and culture. The focus is on how gender varies in relation to ethnicity, race, sexuality, and social class. 3 hours lecture. (005639)
This course considers the unequal distribution of wealth, prestige, knowledge, and power in the U.S., and makes comparisons to other societies. How does inequality get reproduced from one generation to the next? How does inequality affect students today? This course examines the role of social networks, as well as the interconnections between class, race/ethnicity, and gender. 3 hours lecture. (008977)
This course is also offered as MCGS 350 .
This course examines the social construction of race, and studies ethnic and racial relations in the United States, looking at variations by class, gender, and immigration experiences. Students analyze interpersonal relationships between racial and ethnic groups, discrimination, resistance, social movements, and govermental policies 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (005640)
This course studies relationships between ethnic groups outside of the U.S. Consideration is given to ethnic identities, interactions, competition, conflict over resources, cultural preservation, the development of nationalism, and state policies. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (005641)
This course explores the relationship between the individual and society by focusing on how people create and sustain their daily lives. The emphasis is on interacations with others, and the effect of individual behavior upon group dynamics. Socialization, identities and the self, emotions, conformity, and communication are explored. 3 hours lecture. (008994)
A study of the demographic patterns of mortality, fertility, migration, and refugees. Considered are influences such as inequality, economic development, environmental changes, and war on global populations. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (008957)

9 units selected from:

Any Sociology (SOCI) course offerings.

Note: Up to 3 units of SOCI 489, Applied Sociology Internship, may be applied toward the Sociology area of concentration.

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  1. You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  2. You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  3. Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  4. Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  5. Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  6. Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

Internship Policy

With the approval of the appropriate academic advisor, it is possible to enroll for academic credit in an internship course which is related to your program of study in the Social Sciences. Internships are permitted or required in about half of the Social Science Depth fields, all of the minors, and in the Social Science MA program. In some cases, internships may be repeated for credit more than once.

The general guidelines for internships in the undergraduate and graduate Social Science and Special Programs includes appropriate class standing, the completion of an appropriate amount of program course work prior to the internship, working approximately 135 hours for each 3 units of credit, the submission of a written proposal to the faculty supervisor describing the job duties and educational objectives associated with the internship, demonstration that the host agency/location is willing to accept the intern and that the duties are acceptable to them, have submitted to the faculty supervisor an evaluation of the intern's work by the agency/location supervisor, and submit to the faculty supervisor a paper of adequate length which describes the character of the internship and its relationship to the academic program within which the student is working. Graduate internships require graduate standing, the demonstration that the quality of experience merits graduate credit, and demonstration that the internship fits into the overall graduate program.

Catalog Cycle:13