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Please see the section on Course Description Symbols and Terms in the University Catalog for an explanation of course description terminology and symbols, the course numbering system, and course credit units. All courses are lecture and discussion and employ letter grading unless otherwise stated. Some prerequisites may be waived with faculty permission. Many syllabi are available on the Chico Web.

Displaying 1 - 81 out of 81 results.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An introduction to philosophical thought and skills. Issues that traditionally have been of central importance in philosophical inquiry, such as the nature of knowledge, reality, and values, will be emphasized. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007155)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Honors Program.
A special section of PHIL 101 open only to students with demonstrated academic talent. Interested students should consult with the University Honors Advisor. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007156)
A practical course in clear thinking and sound reasoning, which includes training in recognizing and avoiding the most commonly made mistakes in reasoning. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (007151)
Prerequisites: For Students with English as a Second Language.
A special section of Logic and Critical Thinking open only to students with English as a Second Language. Interested students should consult with international evaluations. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (007152)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Honors Program.
A special section of Logic and Critical Thinking open only to students with demonstrated academic talent. Interested students should consult with the University Honors Advisor. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (007153)
A critical survey of different theories of happiness and meaning in life, including discussion of the roles of moral values, mental health, art, music, and food and drink in living well. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007163)
Philosophical interpretations of the human condition as reflected in and affected by modern developments in the arts, science, society, and philosophy. The course covers modern approaches to freedom, consciousness, subjectivity, language, history, alienation, power, and creativity. 3 hours lecture. (007167)
The course provides students intensive training to think, read, and write as clearly and as philosophically as they can be trained to do. One important philosophical problem is used as the sample problem. Students write a short weekly essay and have class discussions of their essays as well as of the reading material. 3 hours lecture. (015857)
A critical examination of diverse philosophical views regarding the causes of war and the prospects for peace. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved General Education course. (021191)
An interdisciplinary cross-cultural survey of prospects for peace. Focuses on non-violent modes of conflict resolution. Major philosophical and social scientific ideas from both the pacifist and non-pacifist traditions are examined in depth. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (021192)
An examination of a variety of approaches to the development of an environmental ethic, including "shallow" and "deep" environmentalism, the balance of nature argument, and the Gaia hypothesis. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (021190)
9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. (007178)
Prerequisites: Department permission.
This course is for special topics offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and may vary from term to term and be different for different sections. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered. 3 hours supervision. (007180)
Western philosophical thought from the pre-Socratics through Stoicism, including movements and figures such as Pythagoreanism, Plato, Aristotle, and Epicureanism. 3 hours lecture. (007181)
A philosophical analysis of major ideas in Chinese, Japanese, and Indian thought and their relationship to basic philosophical developments in the west. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (007185)
This course is also offered as RELS 241 .
In this course we investigate the long and complicated relationship between science and religion by examining both the conflict and co-operation between theologians, philosophers, and scientists in the Western and Eastern worlds throughout history and into the modern age. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007201)
In this course students study some of the most important philosophers in ancient China, who were the central figures of the main philosophical schools from the pre-Ch'in period (from the 5th through the 3rd centuries B.C.) to the Ming Dynasty (from 1368-1644). 3 hours lecture. (021150)
Origins and development of medieval philosophy, centering on its central themes as presented by Plotinus, St. Augustine, Proclus, John Scotus Erigena, Alfarabi, Avicenna, Averroes, Roger Bacon, St. Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. 3 hours discussion. (007184)
Western philosophical thought from the Renaissance through Kant, including Bacon, Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. 3 hours lecture. (007182)
Western philosophical thought from Kant through the twentieth century, including the phenomenological and analytic traditions in western philosophy. 3 hours lecture. (007183)
Study of central figures in analytic philosophy, including Wittgenstein, Quine, Davidson, and Kripke, emphasizing philosophy of language and philosophy of mind. 3 hours seminar. (007203)
The phenomenological movement and its impact on philosophy, literature, and psychology, with attention to Husserl's views on mind, body, and intersubjectivity and Heidegger's ideas of being-in-the-world, authenticity, and death. 3 hours seminar. (007204)
A study of the major philosophic movements which have originated in the United States or had a significant impact on its institutions and culture. 3 hours discussion. (007174)
An examination of existentialism from Kierkegaard and Nietzsche to Sartre, and de Beauvoir. An analysis of the basic forces, concepts, and figures which have shaped existentialism. 3 hours lecture. (007205)
An introduction to moral theory, including such figures as Plato, Aristotle, Kant, and Mill. Alternative views concerning fundamental moral questions will be explored. 3 hours seminar. (007190)
An investigation of major contemporary theories of human happiness. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing the philosophical assumptions which they make about human nature, on evaluating the ethical content of these theories, and applying these theories to one's everyday life. 3 hours discussion. (007191)
Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.
This course is also offered as BIOL 322 .
Critically examines scientific and humanistic world views and sensibilities, directly applying these approaches to contemporary social and personal problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (001148)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Honors Program, faculty permission.
This course is also offered as BIOL 322H .
Critically examines scientific and humanistic world views and sensibilities, directly applying these approaches to contemporary social and personal problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (001149)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Honors Program, faculty permission.
This course is also offered as BIOL 322HI .
Critically examines scientific and humanistic world views and sensibilities, directly applying these approaches to contemporary social and personal problems. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education course. (021255)
Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.
This course is also offered as BIOL 322I .
Critically examines scientific and humanistic world views and sensibilities, directly applying these approaches to contemporary social and personal problems. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education course. (021254)
A philosophical investigation of the moral and legal dimensions of parenting. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (007212)
A philosophical investigation of the moral and legal dimensions of parenting. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education Capstone course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. Formerly PHIL 323I. (021242)
An exploration of conceptual and ethical issues pertaining to intimate relationships, e.g., sexual equality, perversion, fidelity, the nature of love and friendship, marriage, and children. 3 hours discussion. (007222)
An examination of selected ethical issues confronting contemporary society, emphasizing legal and other institutional contexts in which these problems arise. Topics may include genetic engineering, animal rights, and preferential treatment. 3 hours lecture. (007223)
Inquiry into ethical issues faced in the pursuit of individual and social health. Topics include alternative ideas of health, ethical theories, responsibilities of health professionals, access to health care, and environmental health. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007225)
Inquiry into ethical issues faced in the pursuit of individual and social health. Topics include alternative ideas of health, ethical theories, responsibilities of health professionals, access to health care, and environmental health. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education Capstone course. (021351)
An examination of ethical issues that arise in business decisions and the formulation of social policy involving business, e.g. employee rights, consumer and environmental protection, advertising, and affirmative action. Moral theory and alternative conceptions of justice will also be discussed. 3 hours lecture. (007226)
This course is also offered as POLS 332 .
An investigation of contemporary moral issues involved in police work and corrections, such as deadly force, entrapment, undercover work, corruption, and prisoners' rights. 3 hours seminar. (007269)
Prerequisite: PHIL 320 or 321 or 326.
Preperation for the Regional Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl (RIEB) competition that includes review of moral theory, introduction to skills in moral problem solving, application of theory to moral dilemmas across a wide range of personal, social, and professional environments, and oral presentation of solutions to moral dilemmas. Require travel to and participation in the RIEB (one weekend during semester). 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (020605)
An exploration of traditional and contemporary American Indian thought regarding people in relationship to the human and nonhuman worlds, with focus on land ethic, animal ethics, sustainability. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (020644)
Prerequisite: 45 lower-division units.
This course introduces and analyzes the predominant philosophical, cultural, and scientific views on race and examines the issue of racism primarily in contemporary American culture. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021207)
Prerequisite: 45 lower-division units.
This course introduces and analyzes the predominant philosophical, cultural, and scientific views on race and examines the issue of racism primarily in contemporary American culture. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021267)
This course is also offered as RELS 339 .
Draws on religion, philosophy, ethics, cultural analysis, and science to explore the nature and roles of the animal in religious, cultural, scientific, and ethical beliefs and practices. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (021122)
This course is also offered as RELS 339Z .
Draws on religion, philosophy, ethics, cultural analysis, and science to explore the nature and roles of the animal in religious, cultural, scientific, and ethical beliefs and practices. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education Capstone course. (021362)
A philosophical examination of the nature and function of the human community and the political state, and of the implications for individual life of alternative conceptions of society and politics. 3 hours seminar. (007198)
Inquiry into different theories of justice, and their implications for contemporary political issues. Topics include inequality, crime policy, taxes, immigration, globalization, war, and sustainability. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (007211)
Inquiry into different theories of justice, and their implications for contemporary political issues. Topics include inequality, crime policy, taxes, immigration, globalization, war, and sustainability. 3 hours seminar.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education Capstone course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. Formerly PHIL 341I. (021243)
changed to PHIL 109 - 021191. 3 hours seminar. (007224)
changed to PHIL 110 - 021192. 3 hours lecture. (007228)
Examines the various theories put forth to explain the differences between men and women, including scientific, social scientific, and humanistic explanations. Emphasis on feminist perspectives. 3 hours lecture. (003822)
Philosophical studies of the sources, nature, and criteria of knowledge; alternative approaches to problems of perception, meaning, and truth. 3 hours seminar. (007188)
An examination of basic metaphysical problems, such as free will, the mind-body problem, life after death, and some of the systems of thought that attempt to deal with them. 3 hours seminar. (007189)
An examination of the nature of the mind, including such issues as the mind-body problem and the relationship of consciousness to human action. 3 hours seminar. (007208)
This course is also offered as PSYC 363 .
This course examines the history of two competing approaches to psychology, and it evaluates their philosophical and scientific merits. Implications for contemporary debates in psychology are discussed. 3 hours lecture. (007213)
Prerequisites: Junior standing, faculty permission.
This course is also offered as CSCI 380 .
An examination of the emergence of artificial mind in machines, with special attention to related issues in the philosophy of mind and cognitive science. 3 hours discussion. (002312)
This course examines the impact of science on our understanding of the mind, and implications for ethical issues. Discussion of such topics as free will, personal identity, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, information technology, and sustainability, 3 hours discussion. (021123)
An examination of the philosophical issues raised by scientific inquiry. Topics include the logical empiricist view of science, perception, and discovery, scientific paradigms, and the implications of reductivism. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved General Education course. (007193)
In this course students will learn classical propositional and predicate logic. The syntax, semantics and deductive systems of a few formal systems will be studied. 3 hours discussion. (007196)
Intensive reading and discussion of the writing of Satre & Camus. 3 hours seminar. (007309)
Critical examination of selected cinematographic works, with special emphasis on the clarification and analysis of the philosophical ideas they entail. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (007248)
A philosophical study of the nature and significance of art, with references to relevant works. The course considers such themes as the beautiful, the sublime, comedy, tragedy and the social psychological dimensions of art as well as the periods of Romanticism, Modernism, Postmodernism. 3 hours lecture. (020624)
This course explores the major philosophical trends and traditions affecting Jewish life. Hellenistic and rabbinical philosophy, Philo to Maimonides, Spinoza to Moses Mendelsohn and the Enlightenment, and Hebrew-Yiddish renaissance to modern Zionism will be examined. 3 hours seminar. Formerly MJIS 386. (005861)
9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. (007245)
Investigation of special topics in philosophy. Open to upper-division students only. Variable content. 3 hours lecture. (007267)
This course is an independent study of special problems offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (007268)
Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.
Individually directed projects in philosophy. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (007327)
Prerequisite: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
An analysis of twentieth-century ethical theory. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (007270)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
Intensive reading and discussion of special issues in social and political philosophy. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (007319)
This course is also offered as POLS 434 .
The classical roots of western political philosophy and their relationship to contemporary political theory. 3 hours seminar. (007279)
Prerequisite: PHIL 335 or faculty permission.
Preperation for the National Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl (NIEB) competition that includes refining skills in moral problem solving, application of theory to moral dilemmas across a wide range of personal , social, and professional environments, and oral presentation of solutions to moral dilemmas. Requires travel to and participation in the NIEB (5-day block during semester). 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (020606)
This course is also offered as POLS 437 .
An extended discussion of the nature of anarchy, corporatism, oligarchy, classical liberalism, radical liberalism, democratic socialism, communism, and fascism, with a continued focus on these political cultures and their ideological expressions in contemporary politics. 3 hours seminar. (007281)
This course is also offered as POLS 438 .
The philosophical nature and origins of law. Topics to be examined include theories of law, justice, the relationship of law to morality, natural law, responsibility, punishment, and other basic concepts. Approach is both theoretical and via case studies. 3 hours lecture. (007282)
Prerequisites: PHIL 380, faculty permission.
Systematic treatment of truth functions and quantifiers; introduction to mathematical logic. Topics include syntax, semantics, and metatheory for the propositional and predicate calculi, elementary set theory. Russell's paradox, infinite sets. 3 hours discussion. (007195)
Prerequisites: Junior standing or above and either 9 units of philosophy or have declared philosophy as a major or minor, faculty permission.
This course is an internship offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Internships in Philosophy: (a) assisting instructors in lower-division courses; (b) assisting the department in preparation of Philosophy Forums, or department-sponsored discussions, debates, and multimedia presentations; (c) working outside the academic program in government, community, or business, in tasks appropriate for philosophy students; or (d) assisting faculty in research. A maximum of 6 units may be counted toward the major or minor in philosophy. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. (007293)
Prerequisites: Upper-division standing and faculty permission.
Supervised collaborative training in teaching, normally completed in two consecutive semesters. Focus in the first semester is on developing class plans and instructional communication skills. Focus in the second semester is on creating syllabi and developing competence in assessment. Registration is by arrangement with a supervising faculty member. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. (007294)
Prerequisites: Department permission.
This course is for special topics offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and may vary from term to term and be different for different sections. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered. 3 hours lecture. (007330)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
This course is an independent study of special problems offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (007331)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, acceptance into Honors in Philosophy, faculty permission.
To provide opportunity for the student accepted for "Honors in the Major" to prepare and write a thesis on a topic germane to interests developed during the first three years of work in Philosophy. Research and writing will be done under supervision by a staff advisor and for the total of 6 units in consecutive semesters. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (007332)
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and faculty permission.
Supervised collaborative training in teaching, normally completed in two consecutive semesters. Focus in the first semester is on developing class plans and instructional communication skills. Focus in the second semester is on creating syllabi and developing competence in assessment. Registration is by arrangement with a supervising faculty member. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (007333)
This course is a culminating project in the Certificate in Teaching Critical Thinking and is offered for 1.0-6.0 units. It focuses on communication and application of critical thinking techniques in professional and commercial contexts. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 18.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (007334)
Prerequisites: Open only to students pursuing a Master of Arts Degree with a special major, faculty permission.
This course is a graduate-level independent study offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (007341)
Catalog Cycle:13