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Please see the section on Course Description Symbols and Terms in the University Catalog for an explanation of course description terminology and symbols, the course numbering system, and course credit units. All courses are lecture and discussion and employ letter grading unless otherwise stated. Some prerequisites may be waived with faculty permission. Many syllabi are available on the Chico Web.

Displaying 1 - 58 out of 58 results.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Introduction to the computer for non-computer science students. History of the computer, hardware, software, and a variety of computer applications are considered. The social impact and future of computers for communication systems are discussed. An integrated software package for word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation is used. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002279)
Students who have had limited experience with computers should take CSCI 101 before CSCI 111. CSCI 101 provides an overview of the fundamentals of computer science. Number systems and data representation are introduced. An overview of hardware, including the control unit, memory, the ALU, and I/O is provided. Software is introduced with an overview of operating systems, programming languages, applications, and software tools. Students are exposed to common operating systems and applications. Student also design and implement several programs. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (002280)
This course explores the impact of technology on our lives. Aspects of our complex technological society are investigated through study of the various forms technology takes, and readings in contemporary literature regarding the impact these technologies have on individuals. Students are encouraged to reflect on technology in their own lives through journaling, and to discourse with their peers on the benefits and harm to individuals, society, and humanity that modern technology presents. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (020623)
Prerequisites: At least one year of high school algebra and strong computer skills or CSCI 101.
A first-semester programming course, providing an overview of computer systems and an introduction to problem solving and software design using procedural object-oriented programming languages. Coverage includes the software life cycle, as well as algorithms and their role in software design. Students are expected to design, implement, and test a number of programs. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002281)
Corequisite: CSCI 111.
This course supplements CSCI 111 with additional programming activities. It provides students with the opportunity for additional assistance in developing programming abilities. 2 hours activity. Credit/no credit grading. (020718)
A comprehensive introduction to using the UNIX/Linux operating system and the Windows based Cygwin Linux emulator. The course includes hands-on experience with commands, files, and tools. Topics include basic UNIX/Linux commands, filename expansion, command history, command editing, using the UNIX file system (files, file protection, directories), I/O redirection, network utilities, text utlities (editors, office tools), managing processes, pipes, regular expressions, basic shell programming, and advanced utilities (sed, grep, awk). 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (002302)
Prerequisites: Department permission.
This course is for special topics offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and may vary from term to term and be different for different sections. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered. 3 hours supervision. (002307)
Prerequisites: CSCI 111 with a grade of C- or higher.
A second semester object-oriented programming course in computer science that emphasizes problem solving. This course continues the study of software specification, design, implementation, and debugging techniques while introducing abstract data types, fundamental data structures and associated algorithms. Coverage includes dynamic memory, file I/O, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, recursion, and an introduction to the complexity of algorithms. Students are expected to design, implement, test, and analyze a number of programs. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002282)
Corequisite: CSCI 211.
This course supplements CSCI 211 with additional programming activities. It provides students with the opportunity for additional assistance in developing programming abilities. 2 hours activity. Credit/no credit grading. (020719)
Prerequisites: CSCI 111 with a grade of C- or higher, MATH 109 or MATH 120.
Offers an intensive introduction to discrete mathematics as it is used in computer science. Topics include functions, relations, sets, propositional and predicate logic, simple circuit logic, proof techniques, elementary combinatorics, and discrete probability. 3 hours discussion. (002331)
Prerequisites: CSCI 211 with a grade of C- or higher. CSCI 217 or MATH 217 recommended.
Topics include number systems and their rules for arithmetic; basic central processing unit (CPU) organization concepts such as registers, data paths, the arithmetic and logic unit (ALU) and the interface to random access memory (RAM); instruction formats, addressing modes and their uses with a variety of data structures; and parameter passing techniques including the use of a stack frame. The use of good programming methodologies to develop and document algorithms at the assembly language level is emphasized. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002290)
Corequisite: CSCI 221.
This course supplements CSCI 221 with additional programming activities. It provides students with the opportunity for additional assistance in developing programming abilities. 2 hours activity. Credit/no credit grading. (020720)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; Junior standing.
Impact of computers and high-tech systems on people, institutions, organizations, and environment. Examines the following: law, medicine, education, government, data banks, privacy, computer security, changing work, automation, robots, expert systems, AI, social responsibility, ethics, war, conflict resolution. Includes weekly reading, midterm, and final writing projects. Weekly lectures, discussions, films, and writing. No programming. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (002309)
Prerequisites: CSCI 211 with a grade of C- or higher, CSCI 217 or MATH 217 recommended.
This course focuses on object-oriented methodologies in designing and implementing a variety of data structures and algorithms. Coverage includes recursion, trees, search structures, hashing, heaps, sorting algorithms, and graph algorithms. Data structure and algorithm combinations will be studied and analyzed along with their relative merits using both mathematical and empirical measurements. The course includes a number of large programming assignments focusing on object-oriented software engineering and algorithm development. Students will be required to design, implement, test, and analyze their programs in at least one object-oriented language. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002325)
Corequisite: CSCI 311.
This course supplements CSCI 311 with additional programming acivities. It provides students with the opportunity for additional assistance in developing programming abilities. 2 hours activity. Credit/no credit grading. (020721)
Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in CSCI 211.
An investigation into the structure and syntax of current programming languages, including binding, scoping, data types, transfer-of-control structures, subprograms, abstract data types, object-oriented programming, and logical and functional programming. 3 hours discussion. (002323)
Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in CSCI 311.
Operating system fundamentals, including history, process and thread management, concurrency with semaphores and monitors, deadlocks, storage management, file systems, I/O, and distributed systems. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (002328)
Prerequisites: Grade of C- or higher in either CSCI 144 or CSCI 211.
Shell programming provides an easy means to perform a wide range of text/data manipulation, system administration, network administration, and software development tasks in the UNIX, Linux, and Windows environments. This course provides an introduction to shell programming and the types of problems for which it is well suited. Topics include regular expressions, advanced UNIX/Linux utilities, the Bash scripting language, and the Perl programming language. Students solve a variety of tasks using UNIX/Linux utilities, Bash Script, and Perl. This course is recommended for students pursing careers in software development, information technology, and information systems. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (002330)
Prerequisites: Junior standing, faculty permission.
This course is also offered as PHIL 364 .
An examination of the emergence of artificial mind in machines, with special attention to related issues in the philosophy of mind and cognitive science. 3 hours discussion. (002312)
This course presents a practically based treatment of artificial intelligence, and a general introduction of technical issues associated with the development of intelligent systems. The course addresses issues of knowledge representation and natural language processing in particular, from a computational perspective. Students write programs to perform simple analyses of natural language and logical reasoning. Students also explore the limits of computation, using practical and theoretical approaches. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002313)
Prerequisites: CSCI 311 with a grade of C- or higher, department permission.
This internship is offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Students must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (002342)
Prerequisites: Department permission.
This course is for special topics offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and may vary from term to term and be different for different sections. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered. 3 hours lecture. (002350)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
This course is a special topic offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Independent study and investigation of special problems in student's area of concentration. Both registration and study plan must have approval of the instructor and the department chair. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (002351)
Prerequisite: Membership in a Computer Science student professional organization.
Co-curricular activity associated with one or more student professional organizations. Examples include collegiate competitions, such as the ACM Programming Contest, and service projects. Substantial participation is required (approximately 30 hours minimum). 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 3.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (020713)
Prerequisites: CSCI 311 for CSCI/CINS/APCG majors or EECE 237 for Engineering majors with a grade of C- or higher.
An overview of software engineering principles and practice. Topics include: traditional software engineering methodologies, agile software engineering methodologies, requirements engineering, software design, risk analysis, quality assurance, testing, group dynamics, communication, and project planning/management. Students work in groups to design and implement a semester long software project. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (002310)
Prerequisite: CSCI 430 with a grade of C- or higher.
An in depth look at software development tools and software engineering methodology. Topics include: agile software development, version control, static and dynamic code analysis, bug tracking, debugging, and build management. Students work in groups on a semester long project to understand and modify and existing large open source product. An agile software engineering methodology is used to manage the modification project. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (020615)
Prerequisites: CSCI 144 or CSCI 211 with a grade of C- or higher.
This course guides students through the fundamental responsibilities of UNIX system administration. Topics include file system monitoring, file and directory archiving, user account management, shutdown and rebooting sequences, system backups, system log responsibilities, and basic system security. Projects focus on the creation of shell scripts to automate system administration tasks. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (002372)
Prerequisites: CSCI 111 and either CINS 220 or CSCI 221 or EECE 237 (all with a C- or higher for CSCI/CINS majors).
This course is an introduction to basic networking technologies and network management concepts, including major network operating systems, communication architecture focusing on ISO and Internet models with discussion of current standards and protocols. Significant laboratory work using current networking equipment reinforces lectures and provides fundamental experience with router and switch management. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. Formerly CSCI 346. (002340)
Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in CSCI 311, Senior standing.
This capstone course provides a culminating activity in computer science. Students will work independently to specify, design, develop, test, and document a complete software application under faculty supervision. Students present status reports at weekly meetings, and present their finished project at the end of the semester. 9 hours supervision. (002343)
This course is a special topic offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Exploration of selected topics in Computer Science. Consult semester schedules for specific listings. Standard letter grading only. 3 hours discussion. (002389)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
This course is an independent study of special problems offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (002390)
Prerequisites: Open only to juniors and seniors in the major.
Open by invitation to computer science majors with a GPA of 3.5 or higher in the major. This Honors in the Major course focuses on the development of a creative research project in computer science, its presentation, discussion of relevant research materials, and the reporting of findings. 9 hours supervision. (002391)
Prerequisites: CSCI 311 with a grade of C- or higher.
This class focuses on object-oriented programming using large class libraries and interactive programming environments. The course centers on good object-oriented design and implementation by addressing these issues with examples throughout the semester. Students will experience the development environment and extensively use the library of at least one object-oriented programming language. Topics include the proper use of inheritance and model/view/controller distinctions, various issues concerning multithreaded systems, I/O, exception handling, and distributed computing. 3 hours lecture. (002356)
Prerequisites: CSCI 311 with a grade of C- or higher.
The elements of lexical, syntactical, and semantic analysis including finite and push-down automata, top-down and bottom-up parsing, error detection and recovery, semantic actions and code generation. 3 hours discussion. (002369)
Prerequisites: CSCI 340 with a grade of C- or higher.
A hands-on project course that examines the development of systems software. It provides an introduction to writing low level programs in the UNIX/Linux environment. Topics include using system calls, processes, threads, concurrency, process/thread synchronization, signals, and interprocess communication. The course includes several large programming projects which provide students solid expericence in lower level programming. 3 hours discussion. (002378)
Prerequisite: CSCI 446 with a grade of C- or higher.
This course covers advanced network management concepts and implementations including a network operating system, workstation management, and domain administration. Coverage also includes TCP/IP administration and router/hub management. The course provides hands-on experience on network management in a laboratory environment. 2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory. (002382)
Prerequisites: CSCI 217 or MATH 217, CSCI 311, both with a grade of C- or better.
An introduction to formal languages, grammars, and automata theory with unsolvable problems. 3 hours discussion. (002371)
Prerequisites: CSCI 311 with a grade of C- or higher.
Surveys numerical methods and parallel programming. Parallel architectures and algorithms for scientific programming applications, solution of simultaneous linear and non-linear equations, iterative techniques, matrix methods, and error analysis. Development of parallel algorithms, with a focus on efficient implementation and performance. 4 hours discussion. (002332)
Prerequisites: CSCI 311 with a grade of C- or higher.
This course covers algorithms and data structures in computer graphics. Topics include output primitives and their attributes, 2-D and 3-D geometric transformations and viewing, 3-D object modeling, parallel and perspective projections, visible surface detection, illumination models, and rendering algorithms. 3 hours discussion. (002363)
Prerequisites: CSCI 311 with a grade of C- or higher.
Implementation of native mobile applications using a modern framework . Topics include the model-view-controller design pattern, multi-touch event handling, sensory input handling, web service integration, multi-threading and custom user interface design. 3 hours discussion. (002365)
Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in CSCI 311.
Explores the field of digital image processing, providing an overview of its many areas of application and delving into the details of a select set of algorithms. Topics include imaging, digital images, basic image manipulation, grey level and color enhancement, neighborhood operations, the frequency domain, geometric operations, segmentation, morphological image processing, and image compression. 3 hours discussion. (002407)
Prerequisites: CSCI 217 or MATH 217; CSCI 311; both with a grade of C- or higher.
An introduction to the basic principles, techniques, and applications of Artificial Intelligence. Coverage includes knowledge representation, logic, inference, problem solving, search algorithms, game theory, perception, learning, planning, and agent design. Students will program with AI language tools. Additional areas may include expert systems, machine learning, natural language processing, and computer vision. 3 hours discussion. (002360)
Prerequisites: CSCI 211 and CSCI 221 both with a grade of C- or higher.
This course introduces students to the field of robotics by emphasizing the task of endowing machines with intelligence. Topics include various case studies of robot architectures and algorithms that facilitate embodying a robot with behaviors that are traditionally associated with human cognition (e.g., perception, reasoning, intelligent navigation, vision, learning, etc.). Students conduct research and experiments with robotics hardware and software. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002361)
This course is a special topic offered for 1.0-4.0 units. Exploration of selected topics in Computer Science. Consult semester schedules for specific listings. Standard letter grading only. (020184)
Prerequisites: CSCI 511 and classified graduate standing.
This course focuses on distributed computing using the object-oriented paradigm, large class libraries, and the interactive programming environment. The course is designed to prepare the student to do commercial enterprise development. Topics may include object serialization, beans, multithreading, networking, remote objects, database connectivity, servlets, and client/server programming with enterprise and application servers. 3 hours lecture. (002395)
Prerequisites: EECE 320 and classified graduate standing.
Provides a thorough and fundamental treatment of the art of computer architecture. Topics include concepts of von Neumann architectures, methods of evaluating CPU performance, instruction-set design and examples, compiler issues, instruction pipelining, superscalar processors, methods for reduction of branch penalty, memory hierarchies, I/O systems, floating-point arithmetic, and current issues in parallel processing. 3 hours seminar. (002436)
Prerequisites: CSCI 430 and classified graduate standing.
In-depth study and application of the planning, design, implementation, and management of complex software systems. Topics include requirements engineering, formal specifications, object-oriented analysis, design patterns, and peopleware. Teams of students will implement a large software project using a cutting edge software engineering approach. 3 hours discussion. (002394)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing.
Further study of selected advanced topics in software engineering as presented in recently published journals; possible emphasis on research interests and/or projects of faculty in the department. Consult the Graduate Coordinator to determine how many units may be counted toward your major. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 12.0 units. (002396)
Prerequisites: CSCI 340 and classified graduate standing.
In-depth study of operating systems concepts including results from recent research. Topics may include processes, threads, virtual memory, file systems, distributed computing, scheduling, protection, and communication protocols. Students may be required to implement operating system projects. 3 hours seminar. (002430)
Prerequisites: CSCI 311, CSCI 217 or MATH 217 and classified graduate standing.
Algorithms from many areas of computer science will be analyzed. Topics include algorithm design techniques (such as divide-and-conquer, greedy algorithms, dynamic programming, and others), mathematical and empirical analysis of algorithms and NP-completeness. 3 hours seminar. (002417)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing.
Further study of selected advanced topics in database systems as presented in recently published journals; possible emphasis on research interests and/or projects of faculty in the department. Consult the Graduate Coordinator to determine how many units may be counted toward your major. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 12.0 units. (002435)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing.
Further study of selected advanced topics in artificial intelligence as presented in recently published journals; possible emphasis on research interests and/or projects of faculty in the department. Consult the Graduate Coordinator to determine how many units may be counted toward your major. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 12.0 units. (002402)
You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 3.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (020142)
Prerequisite: Candidate status.
This course interweaves three distinct themes (investigation, experimentation, and technical writing), that culminate in a comprehensive research project, presentation, and oral defense. First, the students are immersed into the research process within Computer Science. This includes an understanding of the role, ethics, and responsibility of researchers in Computer Science. The second focus is on rigorous design of experiments for the purpose of testing research hypothesis, simulations, and models, and interpreting the results of those experiments. Finally, proficiency in communication of scientific ideas and findings will be addressed, from intensive reading, critiques, technical writing and oral presentations. 3 hours discussion. (020616)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing, faculty permission.
This course is an independent study offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Independent study and investigation of special problems in student's area of concentration. Both registration and study plan must have approval of the instructor and the student's graduate advisory committee chair. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (002451)
This course is a seminar offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typical subjects in past semesters have included microprogramming theory, operating system development, software engineering principles, data communications, analysis of algorithms, and program optimization. Consult the Class Schedule for listing and prerequisites. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (002446)
Prerequisites: Candidate status.
You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Independent study and investigation of special problems in student's area of concentration. Both registration and study plan must have approval of the instructor and the student's graduate advisory committee chair. Master's Project courses earn a Credit grade upon completion. 9 hours supervision. Credit/no credit grading. (002461)
Prerequisites: Candidate status.
This course is offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Independent study and investigation of special problems in student's area of concentration. Both registration and study plan must have approval of the instructor and the student's graduate advisory committee chair. Master's Thesis courses earn a Credit grade upon completion. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (002453)
Catalog Cycle:14