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The Bachelor of Science in Computer Animation and Game Development

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Degree MAPs page in the University Catalog or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

This major has approved GE modification(s). See below for information on how to apply these modification(s).

  • CDES 103 is an approved GE Writing Intensive substitution.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Literacy Requirement:

See Mathematics and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog. Writing proficiency in the major is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of a course in your major which has been designated as the Writing Proficiency (WP) course for the semester in which you take the course. Students who earn below a C- are required to repeat the course and earn a C- or higher to receive WP credit. See the Class Schedule for the designated WP courses for each semester. You must pass ENGL 130I or JOUR 130I (or equivalent) with a C- or higher before you may register for a WP course.

Course Requirements for the Major: 69 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree. Additional required courses, depending upon the selected option are outlined following the major core program requirements.

Major Core Program: 27 units

9 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course provides an introduction to computer graphics and art. Students use the computer as a tool for creating static and animated images. Basic instruction in design and color relationships is provided. The writing component may include research reports from current graphics publications and/or attendance and discussion of art exhibitions. 1 hour discussion, 4 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. Formerly APCG 110. (002287)
An introduction to digital photography that explores the composition and aesthetics of photography. Emphasis is on concepts and techniques of image manipulation software. The course addresses printing and displaying photographic portfolios. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. Formerly APCG 112. (015869)
An in-depth look into the pre-production process as it directly pertains to storyboard creation, character development and design, pre-visualization techniques, and principles of concept design. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. Formerly APCG 117. (015870)
An introduction course to video game design, studying the art, technology, and science involved in the creation and development of video games. The course covers video game history, game theory, design of computer-based games, delivery systems, development cycle, case studies, ethical and social issues, and emerging technologies and trends. This course emphasizes the understanding and the interdisciplinary nature of video game design. This is not a computer programming course. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. Formerly APCG 170. (020239)
This course introduces application scripting and programming to visual artists using scripting and programming environments embedded in applications and integrated graphical development environments. Fundamental scripting techniques for computer modeling, animation, video game and other visual media will be explored. Elementary application programs will be designed, implemented and tested. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. Formerly APCG 180. (020648)
Prerequisite: APCG 110.
The course explores the basic concepts, principles, practices, tools and techniques of digital modeling, and production pipeline used primarily in CGI, games, and simulations. Topics include creating modifying, texturing, lighting, and rendering basic architectural and prop objects. Projects are designed to guide students through the process of designing digital objects and understanding how objects are imported and used in CGI, games, and simulations. Students produce digital models that demonstrate these concepts, principles, workflow, and technique. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. Formerly APCG 230. (021443)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, APCG 117.
Concentration on story development as it directly relates to Computer Animation. Students write a treatment, script, and storyboard for an animation project. Emphasis is placed on understanding the story structure, writing interesting dialogue and developing an in-depth storyboard. The course gives students a practical approach to creating the pre-production component of an animated "short." 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. Formerly APCG 345. (015871)
You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. Formerly APCG 489. (020128)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
This course is an independent study offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. Formerly APCG 499. (020136)

Supplemental Program Requirements: 15 units

Select one of the following supplemental programs, Art Studio or Communication Design.

Art Studio Program: 15 units

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Beginning drawing techniques based on studio disciplines. A variety of approaches and materials will be used. 6 hours activity. (000710)
Prerequisites: ARTS 125 or faculty permission.
Interpretive drawing techniques with expressive use of graphic media, including color. An introduction to drawing the human body will comprise a major portion of the course. 6 hours activity. (000711)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Survey of the major visual arts of the Ancient World through the Middle Ages. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (000705)
Survey of the major visual arts of Europe and the U.S. from the Renaissance to 1800. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (021083)
Survey of the major visual arts of Europe and the U.S. from 1800 to the Present. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021084)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Foundation studies in the elements and principles of art and design as applied to 2D media. Includes critical thinking and conceptual development, materials and methods, and additive and subtractive color theories and applications. 6 hours activity. This course requires the use of a laptop computer and appropriate software. (000720)
Foundation studies in the elements and principles of art and design as applied to 3D media. Includes critical thinking and conceptual development leading to design and construction, materials and methods, and use of color. 6 hours activity. This course requires the use of a laptop computer and appropriate software. (000721)

1 course selected from:

One Art Studio course approved in advance by your CAGDadvisor.

Communication Design Program: 15 units

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ENGL 130I.
An introduction to the styles and formats used in writing for radio, television, multimedia, and the Web. Writing includes commercials /public service announcements, news, and informational programming. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (001638)
This course will explore the elements of visual design as they apply to the production of video and film. An overview of visual literacy will be given, and the application of these elements to the critical analysis of video and film productions will be discussed. Successful completion of this course for majors requires a grade of C or higher. 3 hours lecture. (001649)

3 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An introduction to computer graphics utilizing both PC and Macintosh platforms. Applications for print, video, and training are stressed. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (001665)
This course provides a theoretical and practical knowledge of digital audio productions techniques for radio, video, and multimedia. Particular emphasis is placed on audio for video and production strategies for effective communication in audio. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (001652)
Introduction to hypertext markup language (HTML), Web standards, and the Web publication process. Includes practical exercises in the creation and publication of Web pages and the construction of coherent Web sites. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (001660)
Discussion and analysis of the function, structure, organization, operation, regulation, and economics of the various telecommunication industries, including broadcasting, cable, independent production, and other related new technologies. Successful completion of this course for majors requires a grade of C or higher. Required for enrollment in upper-division Media Arts courses. 3 hours lecture. (001651)
Prerequisite: CDES 206.
An introduction to 2D design, digital color, vector and raster images, typography, digital production and pre-press techniques. Students learn to prepare documents for printing, using Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop and In Design on the Macintosh computer platform. 1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity. (021059)
Prerequisite: CDES 222.
A study in the design and development of multimedia. Emphasis on conceptualizing multimedia products for use in education and training, information delivery, and performance support. Hands-on skill development in creating digital elements for use in multimedia, such as graphics, audio, and video and combining these elements into interactive programs. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (001773)
Prerequisites: CDES 222.
Modern Web technologies for the production and publication of Web pages and sites. Production of client-side and server-side dynamic Web pages to accept user input and retrieve information from databases. Style sheets for controlling Web page appearance. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (001742)
Prerequisites: CDES 230 for CDES majors.
Other majors require instructor permission. Study of methods, materials, and techniques used by designers to translate literary or verbal messages into visual terms. Designed to equip students with foundation techniques for interpreting and explaining visual concepts. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (001671)
Prerequisites: CDES 226, CDES 261. For APCG majors: APCG 112, CDES 103, CDES 141, CDES 216.
Theory and techniques of video production designed to develop skills in all aspects of electronic field video production. The course includes all pre-production, production, and post-production videotape editing elements related to the production of all video programs. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (001720)
Prerequisites: CDES 314.
Project-based course designed to develop the student's ability to function as a multimedia development team member. Emphasis on design and development of multimedia programs for use in education and training, information delivery, and performance support. 3 hours discussion. (001774)
Prerequisite: CDES 366.
Theory and techniques of color video production designed to develop skills in all aspects of video production. This course includes pre-production and production elements related to the production of all video programs. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (001719)
Prerequisites: CDES 366.
Selected video production projects involving advanced techniques not covered in other production courses, including integration of other media forms into complete video programs. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (001759)

Major Option Course Requirements: 27 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required dependent upon the option chosen. Students must select one of the following options for completion of the major course requirements.  Use the links below to jump to your chosen option.



The Option in Animation Production: 27 units

15 units required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: APCG 110.
The course explores the basic principles and techniques of motion such as in-betweening, timing, squash and stretch, and more. Students produce animated works that demonstrate these principles and techniques and that effectively communicate with the audience. 1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity. Formerly APCG 240. (020240)
Prerequisites: APCG 340, APCG 345.
The computer animation production process is taught in this class. Working from a script, storyboard, and/or animatic, students complete an "animated short" with accompanying sound, music, and visual effects. Emphasis is on working as a member of a computer animation team, similar to a real-world production facility. 3 hours discussion. Formerly APCG 445. (002367)
Prerequisite: Senior standing in APCG.
This course affords senior level students the opportunity to develop work for a professional-quality portfolio through directed senior-level projects demonstrating their creativity, and acquired aesthetic and technical skills in their area of study. Projects are selected by negotiation starting with a specific written proposal and plan. The course utilizes the process of preparing and deploying a professional portfolio to incorporate these new works and refined selections of prior works. The course also addresses self-promotional strategies and successful work practices of industry professionals. Students are required to formally present the portfolio. Class time will be a mix of lecture, discussion, presentation, critique, meetings, and activities. 3 hours discussion. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Formerly APCG 493. (021424)

Note: CAGD493 must be taken twice for a total of 6 units.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: APCG 445.
This course focuses on the completion of animation projects in the post-production environment, including editing, music, sound effects, and other post-production elements to successfully complete professional-level short animations. Emphasis is on working as a member of a computer animation team, similar to a real-world production facility. 3 hours discussion. Formerly APCG 545. (020248)

Computer Animation and Game Development Electives: 12 units

4 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: APCG 110.
This course uses 3-D modeling and animation software in developing 3-D computer models and creating presentations of those models in story-telling still scenes. The tools, techniques, and topics studied include basic and advanced 3-D modeling tools, 3-D scene layout, lighting, texturing, and rendering. 1 hour discussion, 4 hours activity. Formerly APCG 330. (002317)
Prerequisites: APCG 330.
A study of the necessary principles and techniques of creating digital 3-D characters. Students learn the necessary skills for modeling characters, creating effective anatomy, and rigging characters for animation purposes. 1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity. Formerly APCG 331. (020241)
Prerequisites: APCG 240.
The concepts of computer imaging and animation are taught in this project-based course. Focus is on the principles of animation and how they apply to current computer animation techniques. This course emphasizes both creative and technical skills. 1 hour discussion, 4 hours activity. Formerly APCG 340. (002366)
Prerequisites: APCG 170.
The course covers the principles of game design, gaming strategies, game production, and marketing. Students learn to function as a productive member of an interdisciplinary game design team to plan, document, and develop a video game concept. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. Formerly APCG 370. (020242)
Prerequisite: APCG 330.
This course explores the techniques used for simulating realistic lighting and texturing in 2D and 3D environments and develops student skills in accurate image creation. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. Formerly APCG 420. (020243)
Prerequisite: APCG 331.
This course explains the technical skills and challenges of rigging for 3-D animation. Students develop key technical skills for 3-D character setup including how to build, rig, skin, pose, and test 3-D models for animation. Students explore the process of creating joints, assembling skeletons, fine-tuning rigs for realistic motion, rigging bodies and faces, and techniques for binding surfaces to skeletal rigs for animation. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. Formerly APCG 432. (021225)
Prerequisites: APCG 340.
This course covers the study of motion, timing and acting as they apply to animated characters. Emphasis is on the performance of the character and how it reads to the audience. Techniques and methods for facial expressing, lip-synching, and staging are explored. 1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity. Formerly APCG 441. (020245)
Prerequisites: APCG 370.
Using the principles of game design, students work in collaborative teams to design, implement, test, and produce a computer game. Marketing strategies are also explored. 1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity. Formerly APCG 470. (020246)
This course is designed to give hands-on experience to students in Applied Computer Graphics or related majors. Students work as collaborators on large-scale, professional productions relevant to their field of study. Content of this course is subject to change each semester. 1 hour discussion, 4 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 12.0 units. Formerly APCG 495. (020563)
Prerequisites: KINE 322 and basic computer literacy.
Introduction to research in biomechanics. Emphasis is on quantitative videographic techniques of sport and exercise activities. Other technological and bibliographic research methods are covered. 3 hours seminar. (007003)
An introduction to the aesthetic principles and practical methods actors use to bring life to characters in plays. Special attention is given to themes of healthy vs. unhealthy personal, family, and social relationships and their critical examination through the active inquiry of rehearsal. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (009210)
Prerequisites: THEA 121, THEA 170, THEA 250.
Corequisites: Concurrent enrollment in THEA 205 for lighting crew is required.
A study of the visual interpretation and enhancement of plays through the use of light. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (009234)

The Option in Game Development: 27 units

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: APCG 170.
This project-oriented course introduces the concepts and tools used in creating levels for games. Fundamental architectural theory, critical path, flow, pacing, dilemmas, balancing, difficulty level, playtesting, and storytelling relating to level design are studied. Existing game levels are studied and analyzed; original game levels are created using industry toolsets to meet game design objectives. Understanding how level design fits into the production pipeline and how to work in collaborative environments. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. Formerly APCG 270. (021350)
Prerequisites: APCG 170.
The course covers the principles of game design, gaming strategies, game production, and marketing. Students learn to function as a productive member of an interdisciplinary game design team to plan, document, and develop a video game concept. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. Formerly APCG 370. (020242)
Prerequisite: APCG 370.
The course investigates the evolution of mobile gaming and the challenges for developing mobile games such as game design, art, programming, distribution, marketing, and monetization are examined. The phases in mobile game development and various roles in a development project are explored. Existing and planned mobile games are analyzed. The process of planning, designing, implementing, and producing mobile games on various architectures are also investigated. Throughout the course, game concepts and proposals are created for analysis with promising proposals moving on to planning, design, implementation, and development. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. Formerly APCG 377. (021444)
Prerequisites: APCG 370.
Using the principles of game design, students work in collaborative teams to design, implement, test, and produce a computer game. Marketing strategies are also explored. 1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity. Formerly APCG 470. (020246)
This course is designed to give hands-on experience to students in Applied Computer Graphics or related majors. Students work as collaborators on large-scale, professional productions relevant to their field of study. Content of this course is subject to change each semester. 1 hour discussion, 4 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 12.0 units. Formerly APCG 495. (020563)

Computer Animation and Game Development Electives: 12 units

12 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: APCG 110.
The course explores the basic principles and techniques of motion such as in-betweening, timing, squash and stretch, and more. Students produce animated works that demonstrate these principles and techniques and that effectively communicate with the audience. 1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity. Formerly APCG 240. (020240)
Prerequisites: APCG 110.
This course uses 3-D modeling and animation software in developing 3-D computer models and creating presentations of those models in story-telling still scenes. The tools, techniques, and topics studied include basic and advanced 3-D modeling tools, 3-D scene layout, lighting, texturing, and rendering. 1 hour discussion, 4 hours activity. Formerly APCG 330. (002317)
Prerequisites: APCG 330.
A study of the necessary principles and techniques of creating digital 3-D characters. Students learn the necessary skills for modeling characters, creating effective anatomy, and rigging characters for animation purposes. 1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity. Formerly APCG 331. (020241)
Prerequisites: APCG 240.
The concepts of computer imaging and animation are taught in this project-based course. Focus is on the principles of animation and how they apply to current computer animation techniques. This course emphasizes both creative and technical skills. 1 hour discussion, 4 hours activity. Formerly APCG 340. (002366)
Prerequisite: APCG 330.
This course explores the techniques used for simulating realistic lighting and texturing in 2D and 3D environments and develops student skills in accurate image creation. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. Formerly APCG 420. (020243)
Prerequisite: APCG 331.
This course explains the technical skills and challenges of rigging for 3-D animation. Students develop key technical skills for 3-D character setup including how to build, rig, skin, pose, and test 3-D models for animation. Students explore the process of creating joints, assembling skeletons, fine-tuning rigs for realistic motion, rigging bodies and faces, and techniques for binding surfaces to skeletal rigs for animation. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. Formerly APCG 432. (021225)
Prerequisites: APCG 340.
This course covers the study of motion, timing and acting as they apply to animated characters. Emphasis is on the performance of the character and how it reads to the audience. Techniques and methods for facial expressing, lip-synching, and staging are explored. 1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity. Formerly APCG 441. (020245)
Prerequisites: APCG 340, APCG 345.
The computer animation production process is taught in this class. Working from a script, storyboard, and/or animatic, students complete an "animated short" with accompanying sound, music, and visual effects. Emphasis is on working as a member of a computer animation team, similar to a real-world production facility. 3 hours discussion. Formerly APCG 445. (002367)
This course is designed to give hands-on experience to students in Applied Computer Graphics or related majors. Students work as collaborators on large-scale, professional productions relevant to their field of study. Content of this course is subject to change each semester. 1 hour discussion, 4 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 12.0 units. Formerly APCG 495. (020563)
Prerequisites: APCG 445.
This course focuses on the completion of animation projects in the post-production environment, including editing, music, sound effects, and other post-production elements to successfully complete professional-level short animations. Emphasis is on working as a member of a computer animation team, similar to a real-world production facility. 3 hours discussion. Formerly APCG 545. (020248)
Prerequisites: At least one year of high school algebra and strong computer skills or CSCI 101.
A first-semester programming course, providing an overview of computer systems and an introduction to problem solving and software design using procedural object-oriented programming languages. Coverage includes the software life cycle, as well as algorithms and their role in software design. Students are expected to design, implement, and test a number of programs. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002281)
Prerequisites: CSCI 111 with a grade of C- or higher.
A second semester object-oriented programming course in computer science that emphasizes problem solving. This course continues the study of software specification, design, implementation, and debugging techniques while introducing abstract data types, fundamental data structures and associated algorithms. Coverage includes dynamic memory, file I/O, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, recursion, and an introduction to the complexity of algorithms. Students are expected to design, implement, test, and analyze a number of programs. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002282)
Prerequisites: CSCI 211 with a grade of C- or higher, CSCI 217 or MATH 217 recommended.
This course focuses on object-oriented methodologies in designing and implementing a variety of data structures and algorithms. Coverage includes recursion, trees, search structures, hashing, heaps, sorting algorithms, and graph algorithms. Data structure and algorithm combinations will be studied and analyzed along with their relative merits using both mathematical and empirical measurements. The course includes a number of large programming assignments focusing on object-oriented software engineering and algorithm development. Students will be required to design, implement, test, and analyze their programs in at least one object-oriented language. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (002325)
Prerequisites: CSCI 311 for CSCI/CINS/APCG majors or EECE 237 for Engineering majors with a grade of C- or higher.
An overview of software engineering principles and practice. Topics include: traditional software engineering methodologies, agile software engineering methodologies, requirements engineering, software design, risk analysis, quality assurance, testing, group dynamics, communication, and project planning/management. Students work in groups to design and implement a semester long software project. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (002310)
Prerequisites: CSCI 311 with a grade of C- or higher.
This course covers algorithms and data structures in computer graphics. Topics include output primitives and their attributes, 2-D and 3-D geometric transformations and viewing, 3-D object modeling, parallel and perspective projections, visible surface detection, illumination models, and rendering algorithms. 3 hours discussion. (002363)
Prerequisites: CSCI 311 with a grade of C- or higher.
Implementation of native mobile applications using a modern framework . Topics include the model-view-controller design pattern, multi-touch event handling, sensory input handling, web service integration, multi-threading and custom user interface design. 3 hours discussion. (002365)
Prerequisites: CSCI 217 or MATH 217; CSCI 311; both with a grade of C- or higher.
An introduction to the basic principles, techniques, and applications of Artificial Intelligence. Coverage includes knowledge representation, logic, inference, problem solving, search algorithms, game theory, perception, learning, planning, and agent design. Students will program with AI language tools. Additional areas may include expert systems, machine learning, natural language processing, and computer vision. 3 hours discussion. (002360)
Prerequisites: KINE 322 and basic computer literacy.
Introduction to research in biomechanics. Emphasis is on quantitative videographic techniques of sport and exercise activities. Other technological and bibliographic research methods are covered. 3 hours seminar. (007003)
An introduction to the aesthetic principles and practical methods actors use to bring life to characters in plays. Special attention is given to themes of healthy vs. unhealthy personal, family, and social relationships and their critical examination through the active inquiry of rehearsal. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (009210)
Prerequisites: THEA 121, THEA 170, THEA 250.
Corequisites: Concurrent enrollment in THEA 205 for lighting crew is required.
A study of the visual interpretation and enhancement of plays through the use of light. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (009234)

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

A grade of C- or higher is required in all Computer Animation and Game Development courses required for the major.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  1. You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  2. You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  3. Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  4. Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  5. Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  6. Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

Honors in Computer Animation and Game Development

In addition to the common requirements for the Honors in the Major program given above, the Honors in Computer Animation and Game Development program includes the following:

1. You must be recommended by a faculty member.

2. To complete the Honors in Computer Animation and Game Development program, you must complete two semesters of CAGD 499H with minimum grades of B. You must define a research problem or performance area and develop a Honors Research Project/Thesis proposal approved by your major advisor and completed by the end of your second semester of CAGD 499H. You must maintain an overall GPA of at least 3.0 and must make a public presentation of the results of your Honors project.

3. Each Honors in the Major class requires completion of the course plus an additional Honors project and culminates with a public presentation of your Honors project.

Catalog Cycle:15