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The Certificate in Applied Cultural Anthropology

Course Requirements for the Certificate: 24 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required of all candidates for this certificate.

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ANTH 303 or permission of instructor.
This course presents theories and methods of ethnography as well as the ethics of ethnographic fieldwork. Students conduct supervised ethnographic research and present their results both orally and in written format. 6 hours activity. (000610)
A survey of selected mathematical and logical methods and models of relevance to various problems in anthropology. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of anthropological data. 3 hours seminar. (000530)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
This internship is offered in the area of cultural anthropology. Work experience in the community or region is designed for each student. A maximum of 6 units of internship may be counted toward the major. 15 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (020236)

Note: ANTH 489C must be taken for at least 3 units.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ANTH 303 or permission of instructor.
Applications of sociocultural anthropology to the understanding and resolution of contemporary social problems. Seminar format. 3 hours seminar. (000630)
Knowledge and skill development in writing grant proposals for health and community services. Skills in researching government, foundation, and corporate funding opportunities. Diversifying nonprofit income through other fundraising strategies. 3 hours seminar. (001618)

Select a track in consultation with the certificate coordinator to complete certificate requirements.

Track 1: International Development: 9 units

1 course required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Explores the historical and contemporary global movements of people, commodities, technology and ideas. Surveys the impacts of colonial relationships on the contemporary world, post-colonialism and the rise of the development era, and contemporary trends resulting in the increased social and cultural integration and differentiation of individuals and groups around the world. 3 hours lecture. (000582)

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ECON 103.
This course surveys theoretical approaches and policy options to the problems of development and underdevelopment in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Agricultural transformations, industrial development, balance of payments problems, the role of foreign aid, direct foreign investment, the economic role of international institutions such as the World Bank, and other related topics are included in this course. 3 hours lecture. (002673)
Prerequisites: ECON 301.
Economic problems arising out of economic relations and interactions among nations. Current theory of international trade, capital flows, and finance. International economic institutions and their relationship to American foreign policy. 3 hours seminar. (002697)
A systematic survey of human economic activities. Analysis of resource exploitation and use, including agriculture, extractive activities, industry, commerce, and service functions. Recommended for business and liberal arts majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003871)
Study of the theory and practice of land use planning. Analysis of planning processes, elements of the comprehensive plan, zoning, environmental impact of development, regional policies, and growth. Includes investigation of a practical planning problem. 3 hours lecture. (003884)
Concepts in international politics, with emphasis on the analysis of contemporary global issues. Recommended for secondary teachers. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007500)
Prerequisites: POLS 341.
Analysis of the dynamics of international politics, with emphasis on the following theories and concepts: images, decision-making, power, the state, nationalism, balance of power, international system, war, alliances, and imperialism. International Relations majors: 3 hours lecture. (007559)
Analyzes the foreign policies of the Middle Eastern nations. Emphasizes Arab-Israeli and inter-Arab dynamics, the impacts of Muslim culture, sectarian strife, and the roles of external forces, including the superpowers. 3 hours lecture. (007565)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Written Communication (A2) requirement, SOCI 300, SOCI 310, senior standing.
We focus on applying sociological knowledge beyond the classroom. We practice explaining sociological insights to non-sociologists through the news, social media, and other public and private forums. We also learn to put sociology to use in our jobs, community, families, organizations, social movements, and other everyday settings. The main topic varies from semester to semester. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (009001)

Track 2: Medical Anthropology: 9 units

1 course required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Surveys the relationships among disease, curing, culture, and environment. Topics include problems of adapting modern medicines to diverse cultures; explication of the social and cultural correlates of physical and mental health and disease; nutritional implications of culture change; anthropology contributions to health-policy decisions and makers in non-Western countries. 3 hours seminar. (000579)

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An examination of the health care industry and its role in fulfilling national health needs. Topics include national health insurance, health financing, and resource allocation. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002667)
Prerequisites: BIOL 104 is strongly recommended.
Examines the major chronic and communicable diseases, including cause, prevention, and treatment strategies. Behaviors that promote health and reduce premature death and disease are also addressed. 3 hours lecture. (001574)
This course is also offered as MCGS 328 .
Ethnic groups in the U.S. face many health problems. This course focuses on those problems which affect the four largest ethnic groups in the U.S.: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, and Asian Americans. The effects of history, health beliefs and practices, and socioeconomic status on the health of these ethnic populations are addressed. Current and potential strategies to improve health care delivery to these groups are explored. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved US Diversity course. (004448)
An overview of the relationship of people and nature; the impact of environmental conditions, such as water and air pollution, solid wastes, food contamination, vectors, radiation, noise, light, which cause deleterious effects on people's physical, mental, and social well-being. Individual and collective consumer intervention in environmental health problems. 3 hours discussion. Formerly HCSV 362. (001606)
Prerequisites: MATH 105; HCSV 211, HCSV 321 for Health Education majors only. Recommended: HCSV 320.
Study of the patterns of the major chronic and infectious diseases. Both individual- and population-based approaches to prevention and control will be examined. 3 hours discussion. (001607)
This course provides an introduction to the field of health psychology which is the field within psychology devoted to understanding psychological influences on how people stay healthy, why they become ill, and how they respond when they do get ill. Topics include a study of health psychology as a profession, the bio-psychosocial model of health, health belief models and human behavior, health-compromising and health-enhancing behaviors, cognitive-behavioral approaches to behavior change, stress and coping, personality and health, and psychological issues in heart disease, cancer, AIDS, and other diseases. 3 hours discussion. (007975)

Track 3: Environment and Development: 9 units

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Explores the historical and contemporary global movements of people, commodities, technology and ideas. Surveys the impacts of colonial relationships on the contemporary world, post-colonialism and the rise of the development era, and contemporary trends resulting in the increased social and cultural integration and differentiation of individuals and groups around the world. 3 hours lecture. (000582)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Written Communication (A2) requirement; BIOL 152 or faculty permission.
Some taxonomic background is recommended. Interrelationships among living organisms, field observations of such phenomena. Application of quantitative and qualitative methods to the interpretation of ecological phenomena. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (001206)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course examines how societies create, understand, and resolve environmental problems. It uses anthropological methods to explore relations between cultural and natural orders in a wide range of human groups. It emphasizes new approaches that can contribute to the well-being and sustainability of living communities in the twenty-first century. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (020636)
An analysis of the costs and benefits of environmental preservation. Systems for creating economic incentives for pollution abatement. Criteria for establishing optimum pollution abatement, including efficiency, safety, and sustainability standards. Impacts of population growth on global environmental problems. Alternative energy use patterns and their impact on energy markets and global environmental health. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002671)
Prerequisites: BIOL 350.
Examination of the mechanisms, directions, and magnitude of an organism's or ecosystem's response to human perturbation. 3 hours discussion. (004166)
An examination of a variety of approaches to the development of an environmental ethic, including "shallow" and "deep" environmentalism, the balance of nature argument, and the Gaia hypothesis. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (021190)
An introduction to ways that religious and secular world views and ethics influence attitudes, behaviors, and policies toward the environment, society, and economy. The course considers alternative views of self and society, the relationship between human beings and the natural world, and issues of lifestyle, justice, and sustainability. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (021200)
Prerequisites: GEOG 101, GEOG 211, GEOG 343, GEOG 390 or equivalents. Recommended: BIOL 152, BIOL 350, GEOG 315.
Biogeography and landscape ecology are keys for evaluating plant and animal distributions at local to global spatial scales. This course seeks to understand the physical and biological processes that determine these patterns through time, as well as help design management strategies for conserving our planet's biological diversity, and thus ecosystem services. The course emphasizes nature and impact of continuity and patchiness of species distributions and movement, and material flow on the structure and dynamics of wildland, agrarian, and urbanized landscapes. This is thus a highly integrative field of inquiry, pulling on concepts, theories and data from general ecology, evolutionary biology, geology, and physical and human geography. Quantitative methods and field trips consider the biogeography of plants and animals in the local landscapes. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (003929)
Prerequisites: GEOG 101; AGRI 331, BIOL 350, BIOL 414, GEOG 343, GEOG 405S, GEOG 444, or PSSC 330.
Pyrogeography is a comprehensive study of the physical and cultural parameters of fire. Topics covered include the spacial and temporal relationships of fire as an integral landscape process with an emphasis on the maintenance of North American ecosystems; the interpretation of the cultural uses of fire by indigenous communities as well as the historic and contemporary implications of fire management and policies; and the ecological implications of fire on biotic and abiotic systems. 3 hours discussion. (020415)
This course views the environment as shaped by human societies, where competing values and interests play out. Controversial issues such as population growth, pollution, rapid climate change, water and land use, and noxious facility siting in minority, working class, and poor communities are examined. Attention is directed to public policies, corporate practices, and social movements and individual habits that promote solutions. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (008963)

Track 4: Visual Anthropology: 9 units

1 course required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ANTH 303 or faculty permission.
This course explores visual aspects of culture and the use of images for the description, analysis, communication, and interpretation of human behavior. Media examined include, photography, film, video, new media, and art. Students develop ethnographic projects based on original research and using available media technologies. 3 hours lecture. (000586)

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course provides an introduction to the theory and application of photography as a fine art. Basic digital photographic skills and techniques are emphasized. Primary emphasis on the place of photography in art history, current art theory, and issues in photographic representation. 6 hours activity. This course requires the use of a laptop computer and appropriate software. (000738)
Prerequisites: JOUR 260 for majors, no prerequisite for non-majors.
Theory and practice of news photography, including picture-taking for college publications, as well as special photographic projects. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (002011)
This course is an introduction to the fundamental vocabulary and techniques of digital photography. Emphasis is placed on developing visual competence in the creation and consumption of lens-based imagery. Course content includes the basics of camera and digital production techniques for color and black and white photographs that are produced as exhibition-quality prints and on-screen imagery. Includes a broad-based survey of photo history, contemporary theory, and current issues related to the practice of photography. Open to non-majors. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. Formerly CDES 206. (001654)
This course provides a theoretical and practical knowledge of digital audio productions techniques for radio, video, and multimedia. Particular emphasis is placed on audio for video and production strategies for effective communication in audio. 3 hours discussion. Formerly CDES 216. (001652)
Introduction to hypertext markup language (HTML), Web standards, and the Web publication process. Includes practical exercises in the creation and publication of Web pages and the construction of coherent Web sites. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. Formerly CDES 222. (001660)
Prerequisite: MADT 226 for students in the CDES Media Arts Option.
The origins and major movements in the area of the documentary film. The various uses relating to propaganda, social problems, and personal insight. Production motivations in seeking the mass audience through documentary. Open to non-majors. 3 hours discussion. Formerly CDES 342. (001683)
Prerequisite: MADT 396 with a grade of C or higher or faculty permission.
This course addresses the development and execution of a single photography project culminating in a final portfolio. Individual research on historic and contemporary photo-practices is expected. Open to non-majors. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Formerly CDES 496. (001794)

A 2.5 GPA is required for all courses taken for the certificate.

Catalog Cycle:17