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The Minor in European Studies

Course Requirements for the Minor: 23 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required of all candidates for this minor.

8 units selected from:

Any modern European language courses (FREN, GERM, ITAL, PORT, RUSS, or SPAN). The 8 units must be in the same modern European language.

15 units selected from:

Upper-division courses in European studies, approved by European Studies Coordinator. Typically, these courses will be in political science, history, art, music, economics, geography, philosophy, English, or modern language literatures. Examples include:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ARTH 110.
In-depth study of the art and architecture of the Greek world during the Bronze Age, Aegean, Geometric, Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods. An emphasis will be placed upon understanding the development of the Greek artistic concepts, such as idealism and realism, within their cultural and political context. 3 hours lecture. (000858)
Prerequisites: ARTH 110.
In-depth study of the art and architecture of the Roman world covering the Etruscan, Republican, Early and Late Imperial periods. An emphasis will be placed upon understanding the Roman character of Roman art and architecture, as well as domestic life through the arts as found at Pompeii, Herculaneus, etc. 3 hours lecture. (000860)
Prerequisites: ARTH 110.
In-depth study of the art and architecture of the Middle Ages, with an emphasis on the Romanesque and Gothic periods in France and England. The course will cover great cathedrals, such as Notre Dame of Paris, Chartres, Amiens, etc., and their sculpture and stained glass decorations. The course will also provide an understanding of the nature of style change and development from the Classical to the Medieval periods. 3 hours lecture. (000843)
Prerequisites: ARTH130.
An investigation of the European Avant-Garde of the first half of the century: Modernism, Cubism, Fauvism, Expressionism, Futurism, Constructivism, Dada, Neue Sachlichkeit, the Bauhaus, and Surrealism in painting, sculpture, architecture, and performance art. These movements will be related to music, dance, literature, theater, and to the European social, intellectual, and political ambience of the period up to and including World War II, when key European artist refugees arrived in the United States. Such artists as Marcel Duchamp, Kathe Kodwitz, and Pablo Picasso will be considered. 3 hours lecture. (000777)
Prerequisites: ECON 301.
Survey of the development of economic philosophy and its relevance to social and political development and issues. (May not be counted for credit toward a major in Economics if ECON 305 is used.) 3 hours seminar. (002683)
Prerequisites: ECON 301.
An analysis of the economic theories of Karl Marx and Marxist economists with an emphasis on how these theories relate to economic conflicts, crises, and transformations; contrasts to orthodox economic ideas and theories; analysis of 20th century economic problems, and prospects for the future. 3 hours seminar. (002685)
Prerequisites: ECON 301.
Economic problems arising out of economic relations and interactions among nations. Current theory of international trade, capital flows, and finance. International economic institutions and their relationship to American foreign policy. 3 hours seminar. (002697)
A survey of British literature from Beowulf to mid-1700s. 3 hours lecture. (003472)
A survey of British literature from mid-1700s to the twentieth century. 3 hours lecture. (003473)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Written Communication (A2) requirement; ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
An introduction to Shakespeare's principal plays, his art, his age, and his critics; designed especially for English majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (003507)
The course covers the dramatic events of the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917 and the evolution of Soviet and Russian history up to the present. Emphasis is on the social origins of the Russian Revolution, how a revolution for social democracy gave rise to one- party rule, and the chain of events which placed the Soviet Union on a path leading eventually to its demise in 1991 and the recasting of politics and society. 3 hours seminar. (004530)
This course is also offered as WMST 326 .
This course explores major themes and developments in the social and cultural history of European women from the 1700s to the present, including changing gender roles, attitudes toward sexuality, reproduction, and the family. In particular, the course examines women's struggle to define themselves and their roles in society and their impact on the social identities of men. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (004531)
This course examines the main currents of German history from its first unification in 1870-71 under Bismarck to the reunification in 1989-90. The emphasis is on the nature of Imperial Germany, the German experience during the First World War, the political weaknesses and cultural innovations of the Weimar Republic, the rise of Hitler and of Nazism, the nature of the Third Reich, the causes and consequences of the Second World War, the Holocaust, and the experience of divided Germany in the postwar period. 3 hours seminar. (004519)
New ideas about power and social structure in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Europe: Humanism, socio-political transformations, secular attitudes in art and society. 3 hours seminar. (004592)
The breakdown of religious consensus among Europeans; the people and directions of Reform; technology and the military revolution of the period; rulers, people, and the idea of revolution; the reconsolidating of a European elite. 3 hours seminar. (015755)
The Turkish conquests of the 14th and 15th centuries, the diplomatically bedeviling "Eastern question" of the 19th century, the shots at Sarajevo that started the First World War, the creation and destruction of Yugoslavia, the war in Bosnia: conflicts in the Balkan peninsula have influenced and often dominated world affairs. This course traces political, cultural, and religious developments in the Balkan world. After an overview of the earlier centuries, the focus will be on the profound events and current problems of the 20th century. 3 hours seminar. (004543)
Political, social, and cultural history of the British Isles from the advent of the Tudors through the demise of the Stuarts. This course examines the transition from a medieval society to modern Britain, by focusing upon change and continuity in matters of government, religion, gender and the economy. 3 hours seminar. (004523)
A survey of seminal compositions and composers from western art music history. Musical traditions, compositional techniques, performance mediums, and the compositional background of individual works and composers, and the effects of political, social and philosophical issues upon the compositions and composers studies are explored. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (006183)
An examination of existentialism from Kierkegaard and Nietzsche to Sartre, and de Beauvoir. An analysis of the basic forces, concepts, and figures which have shaped existentialism. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (021534)
Western philosophical thought from the Renaissance through Kant, including Bacon, Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. 3 hours lecture. (007182)
Intensive reading and discussion of the writing of Satre & Camus. 3 hours seminar. (007309)
An extended discussion of the nature of anarchy, corporatism, oligarchy, classical liberalism, radical liberalism, democratic socialism, communism, and fascism, with a continued focus on these political cultures and their ideological expressions in contemporary politics. 3 hours seminar. (007281)
This course is also offered as HIST 326 .
This course explores major themes and developments in the social and cultural history of European women from the 1700s to the present, including changing gender roles, attitudes toward sexuality, reproduction, and the family. In particular, the course examines women's struggle to define themselves and their roles in society and their impact on the social identities of men. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (004531)
Catalog Cycle:17