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The Bachelor of Arts in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 39 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Degree MAPs page in the University Catalog or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Upper-Division Writing Requirement:

Writing Across the Curriculum (Executive Memorandum 17-009) is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of four Writing (W) courses, two of which are designated by the major department. See Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog for more details on the four courses.  The first of the major designated Writing (W) courses is listed below.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: CMSD 431, CMSD 440, CMSD 451, CMSD 488W.
Corequisite: CMSD 470.
This course provides students the opportunity for introductory study of basic diagnostic procedures for formal and informal evaluation of communication disorders. A thorough exploration of standardized test construction and administration is covered, as well as less formal assessment tools such as language samples. The information presented includes an examination of methodologies for children and adults. Addresses important issues regarding the assessment of multicultural and multilingual clients. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (002158)

The second major-designated Writing course is the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GW) (Executive Order 665). Students must earn a C- or higher to receive GW credit. The GE Written Communication (A2) requirement must be completed before a student is permitted to register for a GW course.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Course Requirements for the Major: 60-62 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree.

See a major advisor for required course sequence.

16 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Using a conversational approach, this course will provide students with a foundation of expressive and receptive skills in American Sign Language. Cultural aspects of the deaf community, such as history, education, language arts, and pragmatics will be explored. Additionally, lectures will provide information on hearing loss and comparison of sign languages and systems. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (002142)
A survey of the normal processes of communication and of the disorders associated with parameters of communication (i.e., articulation, language, voice, fluency, and audition). The course will also include an overview of the professional aspects of speech-language pathology and audiology. 3 hours discussion. (002144)
The study of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), with emphasis on training students to transcribe speech accurately using the IPA. Students also develop an understanding of phonetic theory and principles. 3 hours lecture. (002155)
Prerequisite: CMSD 220, CMSD 290, CMSD 362.
This course provides students with the opportunity for introductory study of the etiology, symptomatology, evaluation, and treatment of articulation and phonology disorders. 3 hours lecture. (020627)
Prerequisites: CMSD 220, CMSD 290, CMSD 362.
This course provides students with the opportunity for introductory study of the etiology, symptomatology, evaluation, and rehabilitation of voice and fluency disorders. A thorough exploration of laryngeal and velar anatomy and biomechanics will be covered, and measurement of objective and subjective vocal parameters are discussed. Lectures and readings include a comprehensive examination of methodologies for intervention across the lifespan. 3 hours lecture. (020626)
Prerequisites: CMSD 220, CMSD 290, CMSD 362.
Lecture and discussion of normal developmental processes associated with language acquisition. It includes genetic, cultural, and social aspects. Theories of acquisition are discussed. 3 hours lecture. (002151)
This course provides undergraduate students with a basic understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the speech production and perception mechanisms. Empasis is on systems involved with respiration, phonation, articulation, audition, and neurology. The information presented in this class is essential and will lay the foundation for continued learning in communication sciences and disorders. 3 hours lecture. (002152)
Prerequisites: CMSD 220, CMSD 290, CMSD 362.
The student will be provided with an understanding of the acoustic attributes of speech and the basic principles of psychoacoustics, physics, and speech perception. 3 hours lecture. (002153)
Prerequisites: CMSD 321, CMSD 341, CMSD 351, CMSD 363.
This course examines the anatomy and physiology of normal speech and language production; and then proceeds into the pathology of, and remedial techniques for, the aphasias, disorders of the right hemisphere, traumatic brain injury, the dementias, dysarthrias (including cerebral palsy), dyspraxias, and swallowing disorders (including CAS and pediatric swallow). The relationships among the various disorders with attention to the multi-involved individuals, is explored. Collaboration with related allied service experts is described. 3 hours lecture. (002145)
Prerequisites: CMSD 431, CMSD 440, CMSD 451, CMSD 488W.
Corequisite: CMSD 470.
This course provides students the opportunity for introductory study of basic diagnostic procedures for formal and informal evaluation of communication disorders. A thorough exploration of standardized test construction and administration is covered, as well as less formal assessment tools such as language samples. The information presented includes an examination of methodologies for children and adults. Addresses important issues regarding the assessment of multicultural and multilingual clients. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (002158)
Prerequisites: CMSD 321, CMSD 341, CMSD 351, CMSD 363.
This course provides a basic understanding of audiologic tests and procedures and of causes and effects of various hearing disorders. 3 hours lecture. (002159)
Prerequisites: CMSD 431, CMSD 440, CMSD 451, CMSD 488W.
This course deals with the implications of hearing loss on communication, education, and vocation, as well as psycho-social ramifications. Evaluation and remediation, including amplification and assistive devices, are discussed. 3 hours discussion. (002160)
Prerequisites: CMSD 321, CMSD 341, CMSD 351, CMSD 363.
Lecture and discussion of types of language disabilities seen in children. The focus of this course is evaluation and remediation. 3 hours lecture. (002164)
Prerequisites: CMSD 431, CMSD 440, CMSD 451, CMSD 488W.
Corequisite: CMSD 435W.
This course emphasizes development of knowledge and skills prerequisite to clinical practice in speech-language pathology. Lecture and discussion on general treatment principles (learning and teaching), disorder-specific treatment techniques, report writing techniques, clinical problem-solving, cultural issues in treatment, professional requirements and ethics, etc. Direct observation of therapy is required. 3 hours lecture. (002167)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Written Communication (A2) requirement; CMSD 321, CMSD 341, CMSD 351, CMSD 363, MATH 105 (or equivalent).
This course enables students to write clearly and effectively, using APA style; demonstrate knowledge of the basic processes involved in research in communicative disorders; integrate research principles into evidence-based clinical practice; and demonstrate entry-level skills in reading, understanding, and evaluating research in communication sciences and disorders. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. (002169)
Prerequisite: GE Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning Ready.
Summary of numerical data, elementary probability, distributions, and introduction to statistical inference. 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (005501)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A study of the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of children from conception through adolescence. The course examines genetic, biological, and environmental influences including cross-cultural issues. Scheduled observations are included. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (001442)
Examination of the theories and empirical research relevant to physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Influences such as family, peers, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and media are also examined. The interaction between nature and nurture on developmental outcomes is interwoven throughout the course. 3 hours lecture. (007925)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course provides students with knowledge of a variety of aspects of aging that impact the communication process: changes in social, economic status, cognitive, linguistic, sensory, and motor abilities. The class is conducted in seminar style, with research-based student presentations and guest lectures. 3 hours discussion. (002165)
Exploration of changing health status and needs in later life. Discussion of body system changes, bio-psycho-social influences on elders' health, health enhancement strategies, common health problems, treatment, and prevention. Also addresses drug use and abuse, sexuality, chronic illness, use of health delivery systems, including long-term care. 3 hours lecture. Formerly HCSV 541. (001569)
Studies the changes people face as they age in modern society, as individual social beings and as members of a larger society; how social change (economic, political, technological) affects older people in their aging patterns; emphasis is on the social aspects of problems and prospects for America's elders. 3 hours lecture. Formerly HCSV 543. (001571)
An introduction to the psychological processes and phenomena associated with middle and older adulthood. 3 hours lecture. (004457)
Examines major social policies, legislation, programs, models of service delivery, and funding related to the needs and concerns of older adults living in the US. Barriers to service availability and delivery to older populations-at-risk, and types of advocacy efforts to promote policy change are addressed. 3 hours lecture. (001570)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Designed for non-science majors, this course will introduces students to some of the fundamental concepts of chemistry and illustrates how they apply to important contemporary issues, including nuclear power, water purification, alternative energy, climate change, and foods and drugs. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001819)
Prerequisites: Completion of ELM requirement, Intermediate Algebra.
A survey of the principles of chemistry, primarily for students in agriculture, industry and technology, and pre-nursing. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001826)
This course provides an overview of modern physical theory, emphasizing the approach of science in understanding our place in the universe. The student discovers how simple, fundamental physical principles enable us to understand key features in diverse physical systems: from the radiometric dating of early hominid ancestors to the measurement of the expansion rate of the Universe. The course emphasizes our current understanding of astronomy, solar system formation, stellar evolution, and cosmic evolution. This in turn leads us to investigate the physical conditions salient to life on Earth, and ways in which these conditions are 'rare'. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (007392)
Prerequisites: GE Physical Sciences (B1), GE Life Sciences (B2).
This course is intended for non-science majors and explores the deep connection between physics and music. Basic principles of physics and scientific reasoning are taught in the context of the production and perception of music, emphasizing the historic and scientific interplay between physics and music. No previous knowledge of physics or music is assumed. Through learning the physical concepts used to describe music, students are able to extend their understanding to additional examples of physical phenomena. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (021877)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
The qualities of being human are examined through the investigation of evolutionary principles, non-human primates, human fossil record, and living peoples. The biological origin, evolution, and variation of humankind are explored. Lower division General Education Breadth Area B2, Natural Sciences-Life Forms. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (000490)
This course is also offered as SCED 102 .
An integrated study of the nature and interactions of living things and their environments. This course is an introduction to the processes of evolution and speciation, ecology and ecosystem processes, cellular biology and organismal physiology. The course is primarily for students without a strong background in high school biology or chemistry. The course includes online content delivery, in-class discussion, and a hands-on activity session. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (020372)
Study of the structure of the human body, to include muscles, bones, heart, brain, ear, eye, and other systems, as well as a short look at development of the fetus. Lab work entails dissection of the cat and study of the human skeleton. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001110)
Basic functioning of the organ systems of the human body, including the brain and nervous system; vision and hearing; heart and circulation; blood and immunity; respiration, digestion and metabolism; muscles; excretory, endocrine, and reproductive systems. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001114)

Other courses may be substituted upon approval of your advisor.

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  • You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  • You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  • Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  • Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  • Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  • Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

Catalog Cycle:19