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The Master of Arts in English

Course Requirements for the Master's Degree: 30 units

Continuous enrollment is required. A maximum of 6 semester units of transfer and/or CSU, Chico Open University course work may be applied toward the degree.

Graduate Time Limit:

All requirements for the degree are to be completed within five years of the end of the semester of enrollment in the oldest course applied toward the degree. See Master's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements.

The Master's program in English is available to students whose undergraduate record qualifies them according to the standards set forth by the Office of Graduate Studies and the Department of English. Students who don't have the equivalent of a major in English must complete the equivalent of a general English minor.

Prerequisites for Students Who Don't Have an English Major or Minor

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
Practice in writing and revising prose that informs and persuades effectively, based on a study of classical and modern rhetorical principles. Open to all students; required of all English majors, including credential candidates, who should take it by the end of their junior year in preparation for upper-division course work in English. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (003488)
The course focuses on developing analytical approaches to literary genres, primarily short stories, novels, poems, and plays. Required of English majors by end of junior year in preparation for upper-division course work in English. 3 hours lecture. (003431)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A survey of British literature from Beowulf to mid-1700s. 3 hours lecture. (003472)
A survey of British literature from mid-1700s to the twentieth century. 3 hours lecture. (003473)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A survey of American literature from its beginnings to the 1850s. 3 hours lecture. (003475)
A survey of American literature from the 1850s to 1945. 3 hours lecture. (003476)

9 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Study and criticism of selected American films, with emphasis on their literary sources, their illustration of various literary conventions, and their use of language. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (003463)
History of publishing in America, acquisition of basic editorial skills, and study of the editing and publishing process. Class publishes authors' chapbooks. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (003497)
Prerequisites: Junior status at the end of semester in which course is taken and current enrollment in the Honors Program.
An overview of contemporary human geography and some aspects of women's studies, emphasizing the importance of space, movement, place, environment, and family. Primary texts such as novels, memoirs, and films will be used to explore the perspectives of a variety of culture groups. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. (003882)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; ENGL 220 for English Educ students only.
Instruction in the writing of poetry at an intermediate level. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (003443)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; ENGL 220 for English Educ students only.
Instruction in the writing of fiction at an intermediate level. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (003446)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; ENGL 220 for English Educ students only.
Instruction in the writing of fact-based prose (i.e., nonfiction) that acknowledges the presence and creative imagination of the writer at an intermediate level. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (003438)
An introduction to the study of public and scholarly literacy, and its applications in economic systems, schooling, religion, and technology. Required of English majors by the end of the junior year in preparation for upper-division work in English. 3 hours lecture. (003439)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; ENGL 375 recommended.
Advanced practice in writing and in using writing in the classroom for single- and multiple-subject credential candidates. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (003436)
Prerequisite: Engl 130, ENGL 335 recommended.
Through a variety of readings, documentary films, discussions, lectures and writing activities, students will learn about current arguments about the environment and, specifically, contemporary discourse on global climate change, sustainability, environmental activism, and social movements. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (020597)
Prerequisite: Engl 130I. Recommended: ENGL 335.
Through a variety of readings, documentary films, discussions, lectures and writing activities, students will learn about current arguments about the environment and, specifically, contemporary discourse on global climate change, sustainability, environmental activism, and social movements. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education Capstone course. (021357)
Prerequisites: ENGL 333 strongly recommended.
Basic concepts involved in the study of literature, interpretation and criticism of literary works, and suggestions for helping others understand and appreciate literature. Required of multiple-subject credential candidates. 3 hours lecture. (003433)
A study of the many ways in which the child and childhood are dealt with in literary works. Texts for study will be drawn from Western and non-Western works including memoir, fiction, poetry, film, autobiography, books for children and for young adults, essays, and plays. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (003434)
A study of the many ways in which the child and childhood are dealt with in literary works. Texts for study will be drawn from Western and non-Western works including memoir, fiction, poetry, film, autobiography, books for children and for young adults, essays, and plays. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education course. (021253)
This course studies American culture and the various ways in which particular cultural products reinforce, oppose, underscore, or resist the values of the dominant culture - we also explore the gaps between the explicit and the implicit in those cultural values. Our discussions of these texts sustain an ongoing conversation about the various ways science and technology drive and are driven by the movements in culture we explore. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021118)
This course studies American culture and the various ways in which particular cultural products reinforce, oppose, underscore, or resist the values of the dominant culture - we also explore the gaps between the explicit and the implicit in those cultural values. Our discussions of these texts sustain an ongoing conversation about the various ways science and technology drive and are driven by the movements in culture we explore. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021236)
An intensive survey of major issues and themes in non-Western literature. Students examine the interconnections between works of Western cultures and works from the literatures of Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (003470)
An introduction to the literature of ancient Greece and Rome. 3 hours lecture. (003411)
Study of the literary types and qualities of the English Bible and their impact upon British and American literature and language. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved General Education course. (003471)
Discussion of politically engaged literary texts and the possibilities of literary activism. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (021119)
This course explores the way place, socio-economic status, gender, and sexuality inform and inflect the experience of particular cultural groups set against the larger American culture. Classes typically focus on African American, Asian American, Chicana/o, or Native American literature. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021120)
This course explores the way place, socio-economic status, gender, and sexuality inform and inflect the experience of particular cultural groups set against the larger American culture. Classes typically focus on African American, Asian American, Chicana/o, or Native American literature. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021237)
Offers a better understanding of how literature illustrates and mediates the relationships between food and culture, ethnicity, gender, socio-economic classes, and religion. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. (020570)
An introduction to linguistics. Topics include language acquisition, language structure, language variation, and languages of the world. This course is required for CLAD and BCLAD credentials as well as credential programs beginning in the fall of 2003 under SB 2042 standards. 3 hours lecture. (003450)
This course emphasizes both the grammatical content needed to teach non-native speakers and various integrated approaches to teaching grammar. 3 hours lecture. (003527)
An introduction to the descriptive grammar of English. Students learn to use basic syntactic terms to analyze spoken and written English, distinguishing between descriptive and prescriptive grammar. Required of English majors by the end of the junior year in preparation for upper-division course work in English. 3 hours lecture. (003452)
Prerequisites: Department permission.
This course is for special topics offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and may vary from term to term and be different for different sections. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered. 1 hour lecture. (003499)
You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (020178)
Prerequisites: ENGL 220 (may be taken concurrently), ENGL 315, or faculty permission.
Study of and workshop in the editing of literary magazines, manuscripts, and other literary materials. Practice in selection, evaluation, copy editing, and production. Class publishes Watershed literary magazine. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (003581)
Prerequisites: ENGL 335 or ENGL 375 (may be taken concurrently) or faculty permission.
Lecture/discussion with practical application in copyediting manuscripts for publication. Students copyedit manuscripts for magazines and book publishers. 3 hours discussion. (003568)
Prerequisites: ENGL 415 or two 400-level courses from the Minor in Creative Writing.
This course involves students in the process of chapbook production, from advertising, solicitation, judging and selecting manuscripts, through the stages of book production. Students learn to perform the duties of editorial assistants at a small book publisher. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units. (003525)
Prerequisites: ENGL 320 or instructor permission.
Instruction in the writing of poetry at an advanced level. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units. (003519)
Prerequisites: ENGL 321 or 327 or faculty permission.
Instruction in the writing of fiction and/or creative nonfiction at an advanced level. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units. (003521)
Prerequisites: ENGL 333 and ENGL 335 are strongly recommended.
Training and experience in the tutoring of students in composition. With permission of instructor, course may be repeated once for credit, but credit will not count toward major. 3 hours seminar, 3 hours laboratory. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units. (003539)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
Study of the Canterbury Tales and other works by the major poet of the English Middle Ages. The study of Middle English and of medieval society, its values and beliefs as mirrored in Chaucer's works. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (003503)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
An introduction to Shakespeare's principal plays, his art, his age, and his critics; designed especially for English majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (003507)
Prerequisites: ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
Study of British art and culture as revealed in its literature, such as battle poems, morality plays, and Arthurian romances. 3 hours seminar. (003506)
Prerequisites: ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
A study of the literature and culture of Tudor England, emphasizing the prose and poetry of such figures as More, Skelton, Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser and Marlowe. 3 hours seminar. (003511)
Prerequisites: ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
A study of the literature and culture of seventeenth-century England, emphasizing the drama, poetry, and prose of such authors as Webster, Jonson, Herrick, Donne, Herbert, Taylor, Bunyan, and Milton. 3 hours lecture. (003513)
Prerequisites: ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
The literature and intellectual currents of Restoration and eighteenth-century Britain, including works by such authors as Dryden, Addison, Steele, Pope, Swift, Hume, Sterne, Goldsmith, and Johnson. 3 hours seminar. (003514)
Prerequisites: ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
A study of the literary and intellectual currents of the Romantic period, including major essayists and critics, and the poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 3 hours seminar. (003515)
Prerequisites: ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
The poetry and prose of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Hopkins, and others. Attention to important essayists and critics and to the significance of the Victorian scene for our times. 3 hours seminar. (003516)
Study of twentieth-century British, American, Continental, and Latin American poetry. 3 hours seminar. (003543)
Prerequisites: ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
The development of British drama from its beginnings to the nineteenth century. Specific topics vary from semester to semester. 3 hours seminar. (003545)
British, Continental, and American drama from Ibsen to the present. Topics vary from semester to semester. 3 hours seminar. (003549)
Comparative study of major genres, themes, and literary figures in literature. Topics vary from semester to semester. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (003552)
Prerequisites: ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
A study of eighteenth-century and Romantic-period novels, including such authors as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Burney, Austen, and Scott. 3 hours seminar. (003554)
Prerequisites: ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
A study of Victorian novels, including such authors as Thackeray, the Brontes, Dickens, Gaskell, Eliot, Trollope, and Hardy. 3 hours seminar. (003556)
Prerequisites: ENGL 278, ENGL 340.
A critical and historical study of the American novel from its beginnings through the nineteenth century; Cooper, Melville, Hawthorne, Twain, James, and others. 3 hours seminar. (003557)
Prerequisites: ENGL 278, ENGL 340.
An in-depth study of major themes, authors, and works from the beginnings of American literature through the nineteenth century. Topics vary from semester to semester. 3 hours seminar. (003558)
Prerequisites: ENGL 279, ENGL 340.
An in-depth study of major themes, authors, and works in the twentieth-century and contemporary American literature. Topics vary from semester to semester. 3 hours seminar. (003559)
British, American, Continental, and Latin American novels in the twentieth century. 3 hours seminar. (003562)
Prerequisites: ENGL 340; ENGL 278 or ENGL 279.
An intensive study of major authors in American literature. Authors vary by semester. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (003566)
The study of modern world literature. Works may vary from semester to semester and focus on one region or culture (such as India, Africa, or the Caribbean), or several regions or cultures. 3 hours seminar. (003577)
Seminar examination of writers and themes in American literature. Topics vary by semester. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (003583)
An examination of multicultural literature with particular attention paid to the teaching of multicultural literature in the secondary and post-secondary classroom. This course is required for the single subject credential in English. 3 hours seminar. (003586)
Prerequisite: ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
Study of 20th-Century and contemporary poetry, fiction, drama, and essays from British, Irish, and postcolonial authors. 3 hours lecture. (020571)
Prerequisite: ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
Study of 20th-Century and contemporary British and Irish novels, including such authors as Woolf, Conrad, Joyce, Greene, Lessing, Beckett, and Rushdie. 3 hours lecture. (020572)
Prerequisites: ENGL 371.
Introduction to major issues in second language acquisition and teaching. 3 hours seminar. (003540)
An intensive introduction to the theory and practice of second language acquisition and teaching. 3 hours lecture. (020485)
Prerequisites: ENGL 371.
Methods of investigating and reconstructing the history of languages (including those for which no significant earlier written record exists). Examining and evaluating the linguistic evidence for its insights into the earlier culture, migration patterns, and linguistic contacts of the speakers. 3 hours lecture. (003529)
Prerequisites: ENGL 371, ENGL 375.
Study of syntax and morphology, focusing on similarities and differences among languages from the viewpoint of both form and function. 3 hours seminar. (003531)
The development of the English language from its earliest origins to the present. Fundamental rules of language change in syntax, morphology, and phonology, with application to examples from Old, Middle, Early Modern, and contemporary English. 3 hours lecture. (003532)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, ENGL 371.
Study of world's sound systems as well as the relevant phonetics and morphology with an emphasis on English and second language acquisition. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (003533)
A comprehensive exploration of semantics, including theories of meaning, relationship between semantics and conceptual structure, semantics and cognition in language acquisition, and the relationship between meaning and use. 3 hours lecture. (003534)
An examination of recent psycholinguistic theory and research in the field of reading as a language process, with practical experience in reading instruction. 3 hours seminar. (003535)
Prerequisites: ENGL 371 or WMST 200.
This course explores recent theories and applications associated with the relationships among language, gender, and sexuality. The course includes a focus on the intersection of linguistic gender with class and ethnicity by drawing on research in linguistic anthropology and sociolinguistics. There will be an examination of gendered speech, writing, and sign from a variety of the world's languages. 3 hours lecture. (003536)
Study of major texts in literary theory and criticism from Plato and Aristotle to the present day. 3 hours lecture. (020573)
This course is an internship offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Supervised, out-of-classroom work experience in English-related activities in the University, community, and businesses. No more than 3 units may be applied to the major. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (003569)
This course is for special topics offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and may vary from term to term and be different for different sections. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered. 1 hour seminar. (003612)
This course is for special topics offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and will vary from term to term and be different for different sections. 3 hours lecture. (003501)
Prerequisites: ENGL 415; or two 400-level courses from the Minor in Creative Writing; or ENGL 620.
This course involves students in the production of chapbook, from advertising, solicitation, to judging and selecting manuscripts, as they work with Flume Press at CSU, Chico. Students learn to perform the duties of editorial assistants at a small book publisher and produce the resulting chapbook. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units. (003645)
Professional development seminar in the theory, research, and practice of writing instruction for practicing teachers, kindergarten through college. Topics include writing as inquiry, genre studies, critical pedagogy, responding to writing, technology and writing, writing in the disciplines, writing assessment, and writing to learn. Participants write about their teaching practices, develop inquiry-based presentations, and read current research in the teaching of writing. 1 hour discussion. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (003570)
Prerequisites: ENGL 335, ENGL 375, and ENGL 441.
A capstone course focusing on connections among literature, language, and composition required of all single-subject credential candidates. To be taken during the senior year. 3 hours seminar. (003579)
Prerequisites: ENGL 371, ENGL 375.
An exploration of special topics in contemporary linguistics, including, but not limited to, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, discourse analysis, stylistics, phonology, and morphology. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (003589)
Prerequisites: ENGL 340, ENGL 335; 3 units selected from ENGL 276, ENGL 277, ENGL 278, or ENGL 279 ; 3 units of 400-level genre or period course with grades that place student in top 5%; interview; faculty permission.
Six-unit Honors senior thesis independent study involving substantial research, extended critical analysis, and public presentation. Grade of B or higher required for Honors credit. These units are in addition to those required for the major in English. 18 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (003621)

Elective courses should be chosen in consultatio with the Graduate Coordinator. Equivalent coursework on listed transcripts will be considered in all categories. Substitutions shall be made in consulatation with the Graduate Coordinator.

The Master of Arts degree in English offers patterns in British and American Literature, Creative Writing, and Language and Literacy.

Prerequisites for Admission to Conditionally Classified Status:

1. Satisfactory grade point average as specified in "Admission to Master's Degree Programs" in the University Catalog.

2. An acceptable baccalaureate from an accredited institution, or an equivalent approved by the Office of Graduate Studies.

3. Completion of the Graduate Record Examination with a minimum score of 500 on the verbal portion of the General Test (native English speakers only). The GRE score is only one of the factors considered on the assessment of the applicant.

4. For all applicants who have not completed a baccalaureate degree (or three years of full-time academic study at the post-secondary level) in Australia, Great Britain, Anglophone Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, or the United States, completion of one of the following:

  1. Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum paper-based score of 580 or Internet-based score of 92; or
  2. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with a minimum score of 7.0; or
  3. Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE) with a minimum score of 65.

Further, a significantly low score on any part of these required exams will require that a student enroll in remedial courses appropriate to the area of weakness as specified by the Graduate Advisor.

5. Submission, with the application, of a writing sample demonstrating critical and analytical skills. Creative Writing students should also submit a sample of creative work.

6. The Graduate Committee will make assessments of the applicant's complete record, balancing GPA, letters of recommendation, GRE score, writing samples, and any other material in the application package.

7. Approval by the department and the Office of Graduate Studies.

Prerequisites for Admission to Classified Status:

In addition to any requirements listed above:

1. Completion of a departmentally administered essay assignment, by those required to take TOEFL, during registration week of the first semester. Remedial work in composition will be required for those whose writing is judged inadequate by essay readers, and a student may not be advanced to classified status until an acceptable level of proficiency is reached.

2. Two letters of recommendation, preferably from English department faculty who know the student's work, to the departmental Graduate Coordinator.

3. Completion of ENGL 276 and ENGL 277, Survey of British Literature, or its equivalent. Students coming to Chico from undergraduate institutions that offer an undergraduate comprehensive examination in literature or a course of the same kind as the Survey of British Literature are requested to submit, when possible, as one of their letters of recommendation, a statement from a faculty member directly involved with that examination or course.

4. A post baccalaureate grade point average of at least 3.0 in a minimum of 12 departmentally specified units of letter-graded, graduate-level course work.

5. Completion of departmental literacy requirement.

Advancement to Candidacy:

In addition to any requirements listed above:

1. Classified graduate standing and completion at the University of at least 9 units of the proposed program.

2. Fulfillment of the foreign language requirement (see below).

3. Formation of the graduate advisory (thesis) committee in consultation with the Graduate Coordinator.

4. Development of an approved program in consultation with the Graduate Coordinator. Such a program will include:

(a) A statement of aims.

(b) An outline of course units to be earned in pursuit of these aims.

(c) A description of the nature of the culminating activity.

Requirements for the MA Degree in English:

Completion of all requirements as established by the department graduate committee, the graduate advisory (thesis) committee, and the Office of Graduate Studies, to include:

1. Completion of an approved program consisting of 30 units of 400/500/600-level courses as follows:

1 course required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Advanced study of the major literary critics from Aristotle to modern times, including the study of contemporary approaches to the reading and interpreting of texts. 3 hours seminar. (003658)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
For more information regarding the specific coverage of this course, please see the instructor's course description posted on the Department's website. 3 hours seminar. (003626)
For more information regarding the specific coverage of this course, please see the instructor's course description posted on the Department's website. 3 hours seminar. (003628)
For more information regarding the specific coverage of this course, please see the instructor's course description posted on the Department's website. 3 hours seminar. (003632)
For more information regarding the specific coverage of this course, please see the instructor's course description posted on the Department's website. 3 hours seminar. (003636)
For more information regarding the specific coverage of this course, please see the instructor's course description posted on the Department's website. 3 hours seminar. (003639)

Note: Students may also take ENGL 648, 652, 654, 656, or 657 if the reading list covers primarily texts written prior to 1900.

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. The Master's Project is developed in consultation with Graduate Coordinator. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (003694)
This course is offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. The Master's Thesis is developed in consultation with Graduate Coordinator. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (003692)

Students who plan to do a creative project (ENGL 699P) must have permission to do so from the creative writing coordinator and must have completed the requirements for the Creative Writing Pattern.

Twelve units selected from one of the patterns listed below. Specific courses for each pattern will be chosen in consultation with the Graduate Coordinator. With the permission from the Graduate Coordinator and thesis/project committee, students may also take related courses beyond their chosen pattern requirements.

Creative Writing Pattern

6 units required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: At least one 400-level creative writing course or instructor permission.
This course is for graduate students who are independently writing poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction. Course emphasis is on reading, discussing, and critiquing students' manuscripts in progress, including studies in theory and forms of poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (003642)

ENGL 620 must be taken twice for credit.

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ENGL 415 or two 400-level courses from the Minor in Creative Writing.
This course involves students in the process of chapbook production, from advertising, solicitation, judging and selecting manuscripts, through the stages of book production. Students learn to perform the duties of editorial assistants at a small book publisher. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units. (003525)
Prerequisites: ENGL 320 or instructor permission.
Instruction in the writing of poetry at an advanced level. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units. (003519)
Prerequisites: ENGL 321 or 327 or faculty permission.
Instruction in the writing of fiction and/or creative nonfiction at an advanced level. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units. (003521)
Prerequisites: ENGL 415; or two 400-level courses from the Minor in Creative Writing; or ENGL 620.
This course involves students in the production of chapbook, from advertising, solicitation, to judging and selecting manuscripts, as they work with Flume Press at CSU, Chico. Students learn to perform the duties of editorial assistants at a small book publisher and produce the resulting chapbook. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units. (003645)
Prerequisites: ENGL 431 or ENGL 470 for ESL; faculty permission.
Supervised classroom experience in teaching ESL, literature, and creative writing. Students must be in MA program in English and have permission of program coordinator and instructor of record. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (015976)

3 units selected from:

Any 600-level literature class after 1900

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is a graduate-level independent study offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (003691)

Language and Literacy Pattern

4 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ENGL 333 and ENGL 335 are strongly recommended.
Training and experience in the tutoring of students in composition. With permission of instructor, course may be repeated once for credit, but credit will not count toward major. 3 hours seminar, 3 hours laboratory. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units. (003539)
An examination of recent psycholinguistic theory and research in the field of reading as a language process, with practical experience in reading instruction. 3 hours seminar. (003535)
Theories of distributed and situated cognition and learning as applied to literacy development and education. The course materials come from a variety of disciplines, including psycholinguistics, anthropology, cognitive science, sociology, education, and literacy theory. 3 hours lecture. (020258)
Intensive study of contemporary literacy theory and practice; the cultural and individual bases of the development of literacy. 3 hours seminar. (003657)
Weekly seminar in the theory and practice of teaching composition. Required of all prospective teaching associates. 3 hours seminar. (003660)
Intensive study of the current theories and administrative practices which structure composition program development. 3 hours seminar. (003662)
Current issues in the study of literature, critical theory, composition, and linguistics. Specific topics vary from semester to semester. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (003663)

Literature Pattern

1 course required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is a graduate-level independent study offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (003691)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
For more information regarding the specific coverage of this course, please see the instructor's course description posted on the Department's website. 3 hours seminar. (003626)
For more information regarding the specific coverage of this course, please see the instructor's course description posted on the Department's website. 3 hours seminar. (003628)
For more information regarding the specific coverage of this course, please see the instructor's course description posted on the Department's website. 3 hours seminar. (003632)
For more information regarding the specific coverage of this course, please see the instructor's course description posted on the Department's website. 3 hours seminar. (003636)
For more information regarding the specific coverage of this course, please see the instructor's course description posted on the Department's website. 3 hours seminar. (003639)

Note: Students may also take ENGL 648, 652, 654, 656, or 657 if the reading list covers primarily texts written prior to 1900.

2 courses selected from:

Courses may be selected from any 600-level literature courses.

Electives

9 units required:

Students may select the 600-level courses from Creative Writing, Language and Literacy, or Literature.

(a) You must take at least 24 units of 600-level courses in the discipline of English.

(b) You may take up to 6 units from 400/500-level courses.

(c) ENGL 689T (Internship in Teaching College English) may be repeated, but only one course (3 units) will be counted as an elective.

(d) Normally, not more than a total of 6 units of Independent Study (ENGL 697) and Master's Thesis (ENGL 699t) or Masters Project (ENGL 699P) will be allowed. Note: ENGL 697 may be taken for a letter grade.

2. Completion and approval by the Graduate Coordinator of an acceptable culminating activity. The English Department Graduate Committee will recommend granting the master's degree to candidates who have satisfactorily completed one of the following:

(a) A written thesis prepared according to the standards established in A Guide to Graduate Studies: Policies, Procedures, and Format, available from the Office of Graduate Studies. The thesis will present a scholarly/critical study or a sustained creative effort.

(b) A terminal project equivalent in scope to the thesis or seminar papers options and appropriate to the candidate's focus of study or special competence.

3. Approval by the departmental Graduate Committee and the Graduate Coordinators Committee on behalf of the faculty of the University.

Graduate Requirement in Writing Proficiency:

Writing proficiency is a graduation requirement.

English degree candidates will demonstrate writing competence through two examples of their writing which have been submitted as assigned work. These must be presented to the Graduate Coordinator by the instructor(s) who assigned them, together with a written statement of his/her opinion of the papers' authenticity. The papers may not represent work done in connection with the thesis or terminal project, and at least one sample must demonstrate documentation of research according to the latest edition of the MLA Handbook style standards. This requirement must be met before the student is advanced to classified status.

Foreign Language Requirement:

Prior to advancement to candidacy, students must fulfill a foreign language requirement in one of the following ways:

1. Show evidence of completion, within the last five years, of the equivalent of two years of foreign language study at the college/university level with a grade of B or better; or

2. Show evidence of completion, within the last five years, of an upper-division foreign language literature course taught in the language with a grade of B or better; or

3. Demonstrate a reading knowledge of a foreign language through a departmentally authorized examination; or

4. Completion of a pre-approved translation project supervised by a qualified academic fluent in the language of choice. Interested students will submit a written proposal and timeline to the Graduate Coordinator who will, in consultation with the Graduate Committee, review and approve projects on a case-by-case basis. The proposal must detail how intermediate reading knowledge will be demonstrated. Approved projects must be undertaken for academic credit, typically a 3.0 unit independent study (e.g., FREN 697 or an approved equivalent) taken for a letter grade; a grade of B or higher satisfies the foreign language requirement.

Note: Appropriate accommodations will be made for the deaf or hearing impaired. Units earned in language courses will not be counted toward the 30 units required for the Master of Arts in English. The language taken must be a major literary language. International students from non-English-speaking countries will be exempt from this language requirement.

Graduate Grading Requirements:

All courses in the major (with the exceptions of Independent Study - 697, Comprehensive Examination - 696, Master's Project - 699P, and Master's Thesis - 699T) must be taken for a letter grade, except those courses specified by the department as ABC/No Credit (400/500-level courses), AB/No Credit (600-level courses), or Credit/No Credit grading only. A maximum of 10 units combined of ABC/No Credit, AB/No Credit, and Credit/No Credit grades may be used on the approved program (including 697, 696, 699P, 699T and courses outside the major). While grading standards are determined by individual programs and instructors, it is also the policy of the University that unsatisfactory grades may be given when work fails to reflect achievement of the high standards, including high writing standards, expected of students pursuing graduate study.

Students must maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average in each of the following three categories: all course work taken at any accredited institution subsequent to admission to the master's program; all course work taken at CSU, Chico subsequent to admission to the program; and all courses on the approved master's degree program.

Graduate Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory each semester for all English majors. Consult the Graduate Coordinator for specifics.

Catalog Cycle:14