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The Bachelor of Arts in Intersectional Chicanx/Latinx Studies

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 39 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Degree MAPs page in the University Catalog or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Upper-Division Writing Requirement:

Writing Across the Curriculum (Executive Memorandum 17-009) is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of four Writing (W) courses, two of which are designated by the major department. See Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog for more details on the four courses.  The first of the major designated Writing (W) courses is listed below.

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ARTH 120.
This course is also offered as ARTH 473W.
A survey of Mexican art and culture from the Cortesian Conquest, the Colonial Period of monastery- and church-building, the Revolution of 1810, the Revolution of 1910, and the painters of the great revolutionary mural movement that followed, Rivera, Orozco, and Siqueriros, to contemporary artists who have tended toward international pluralism. Attention is given to the process of acculturation that produced the modern Mexican peoples, their national character, and their contemporary art. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. Formerly CHST 473W. (000842)
This course studies American culture and the various ways in which particular cultural products reinforce, oppose, underscore, or resist the values of the dominant culture - we also explore the gaps between the explicit and the implicit in those cultural values. Our discussions of these texts sustain an ongoing conversation about the various ways science and technology drive and are driven by the movements in culture we explore. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021236)
This course explores the way place, socio-economic status, gender, and sexuality inform and inflect the experience of particular cultural groups set against the larger American culture. Classes typically focus on African American, Asian American, Chicana/o, or Native American literature. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021237)
Prerequisite: MCGS 155 or WMST 170 recommended.
An exploration of current scholarship in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer theories, issues, and communities. Grounded in feminist scholarship, the course examines LGBTQ identity construction and formation through media, politics, sex/sexuality, science, and the law. Specific focus will vary from semester to semester. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021360)

The second major-designated Writing course is the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GW) (Executive Order 665). Students must earn a C- or higher to receive GW credit. The GE Written Communication (A2) requirement must be completed before a student is permitted to register for a GW course.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Course Requirements for the Major: 45-46 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree.

7 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as HIST 135.
Study of the Mexican-American subculture in the United States after 1848: historical background, migration, cultural patterns, folklore, economic and political objectives. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. Formerly CHST 135. (001974)
This course is also offered as SOCI 157.
This course explores contemporary issues affecting Latinx communities in the United States, including values, social organization, urbanization, gender, sexuality, and socio-economics. Special attention is paid to issues of colonialism, human rights, U.S. foreign policy toward Latin America, racism, capitalist globalization, migration, emerging political and economic shifts in the Americas, and new local and transnational efforts for social change on the part of Latin America's peoples and Latinx in the U.S. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. Formerly CHST 157. (001973)
This course is also offered as MADT 203.
Viewing and analysis of Latinx and Chicanx films, from classics to contemporary popular and critical hits. Feature and documentary films are discussed in sociopolitical context and as cultural production. Special attention is paid to intersections between race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, socio-economic class, and other facets of Latinx identities. 3 hours lecture. Formerly CHST 203. (021921)
This course is also offered as SOCI 358.
This course examines the identities and experiences of Latinx in contemporary society. From identity politics, to immigration policy, to the complex intersections of race, class, gender & sexuality, the broad spectrum of today¿s most pressing issues are investigated. Emerging or changing situations, events, and/or issues may be integrated into the class in any given semester. Latinx groups examined include heritage from throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. Formerly CHST 358. (001980)
An introduction to the concepts, terminology, and issues in multicultural and gender studies, including exploration of America's multicultural history, gender as an element of culture, and contemporary issues in the field. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (002602)
A seminar designed to complement the 120-hour fieldwork portion of your service/activism internship in the area of multicultural and/or gender studies. In order to pass this course you must receive a review of at least "satisfactory" from your fieldwork supervisor. No more than 3 units may be counted toward the major or minor. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Formerly MCGS 489. (005647)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Written Communication (A2) requirement.
Exploration of theory and extended research in the field of multicultural and gender studies leading to a public presentation. This course is designed as the capstone experience for multicultural and gender studies majors and minors. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. (002610)

Note: MCGS 389 must be taken for 3 units. This is a letter graded internship.

Genders & Sexuality: 3 units

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: CHLX 157 or MCGS 310W.
An in-depth study of gender and sexuality diversity within Latinx communities, this course delves into gender and sexuality based societal expectations and resistance to them. Explore gender non-conforming, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and other lived experiences of diverse groups such as Chican@, Xicano, Latnix, and Blacktinos 3 hours lecture. Formerly CHST 410. (021868)
Prerequisite: CHLX 157 or WMST 170.
Latina and Chicana women had been wielding power for centuries before feminism arrived, and now they are unstoppable. Find out how Xicana feminism challenged racism and sexism, how the activism of diverse Latinas has changed the landscapes of gender and ethnicity. Explore the complexities of Latina/Chicana power: political, social, spiritual, sexual, and artistic. 3 hours lecture. Formerly CHST 420. (021869)

Race/Ethnicities: 3 units

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as SOCI 240.
This fully online course facilitates the study of intersecting systems of oppression and inequity--in particular socio-economic class, ethnicity, and gender--all of which impact access to basic needs, especially healthy food. The course provides a scholarly, theoretical context for individuals working with communities outside of the middle class. Students are guided in the application of concepts and ideas in their personal lives and professional practice. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021867)
This course is also offered as POLS 327.
Analysis of the role of race and ethnicity in the American political process, including a critique of their role in local, state, and national elections. Factors accounting for participation and non-participation will be analyzed. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000137)
This course is also offered as SOCI 350.
This course examines the social construction of race, and studies ethnic and racial relations in the United States, looking at variations by class, gender, and immigration experiences. Students analyze interpersonal relationships between racial and ethnic groups, discrimination, resistance, social movements, and governmental policies 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (005640)
An exploration of how science and culture have affected people's understandings of gender and sexuality, in both Western and non-Western cultures, from ancient times to the present. 3 hours lecture. (005642)

Arts & Humanities: 3-4 units

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as FLNG 254, HUMN 254.
An overview of Chicana/o art, literature, and ideology. The course examines the trajectory of the Chicano Movement and follows the development of artistic and intellectual culture down to contemporary times. We explore how Chicano literature asks enduring and universal questions and at the same time reflects a specific historical and cultural reality that is fundamental to the United States experience. Reading, discussions, and reports are in English (with some code-switching in Spanish). 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. Formerly CHST 254. (021205)
Prerequisites: SPAN 301; SPAN 341 or SPAN 342; or faculty permission.
This course is also offered as SPAN 454.
A study of the Chicano people as reflected in selected films and literature. Discussions will be in Spanish, readings in English and Spanish, reports in Spanish. 3 hours seminar. Formerly CHST 454. (001984)
Prerequisites: ARTH 120.
This course is also offered as ARTH 473W.
A survey of Mexican art and culture from the Cortesian Conquest, the Colonial Period of monastery- and church-building, the Revolution of 1810, the Revolution of 1910, and the painters of the great revolutionary mural movement that followed, Rivera, Orozco, and Siqueriros, to contemporary artists who have tended toward international pluralism. Attention is given to the process of acculturation that produced the modern Mexican peoples, their national character, and their contemporary art. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. Formerly CHST 473W. (000842)
This course explores the way place, socio-economic status, gender, and sexuality inform and inflect the experience of particular cultural groups set against the larger American culture. Classes typically focus on African American, Asian American, Chicana/o, or Native American literature. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021237)
Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in SPAN 101 and SPAN 102. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (009121)
Prerequisite: Faculty permission.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills possessed by speakers of Spanish who have not studied the language formally. This course includes composition and reading. Particular focus on the Mexican-American/Latino experience. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (009123)
Prerequisite: SPAN 201 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in SPAN 101, SPAN 102, and SPAN 201. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (009120)
Prerequisite: Faculty permission.
Further reviewing and expanding of language skills possessed by speakers of Spanish who have not studied the language formally. Builds on topics studied in SPAN 201N. This course includes composition and reading. Particular focus on the Mexican-American/Latino experience. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (009126)

Latin American Studies Context: 3 units

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A survey of Latin America since independence from Iberia, highlighting the chaotic years of post-independence state building, the region's integration into the global capitalist economy and the age of mass politics and revolutionary ferment after 1930. The final weeks focus on Latin America's experience with military dictatorship and current transitions to democracy. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004495)
This course explores twentieth-century social revolutions in Mexico, Cuba, Chile and Nicaragua. Additional consideration will be given to more recent phenomena in Venezuela and the Mexican state of Chiapas. Evaluates the role played by class, ethnicity, and gender in these movements and considers whether the driving force of social revolution in Latin America is Marxism or nationalist/anti-imperialism. 3 hours seminar. (004647)
This course is also offered as GEOG 357.
Study of the physical environment, human settlement, development, and modern problems of the nations of Latin America. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021143)
This course is also offered as HIST 382.
An interdisciplinary approach to the history and politics of Mexico. This course will introduce students to the panorama of Mexican history since 1810 while delineating the roots and development of the current Mexican political system. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. Formerly LAST 350. (004558)
Prerequisites: SPAN 301 or faculty permission.
A survey of the cultural, social, economic, and political heritage of Latin America and its evolution into contemporary Latin American society. 3 hours discussion. (009155)

Social Sciences: 3 units

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course on immigration is a social-historical examination of the migration and settlement of Mexican, Caribbean, South American and Central American origin people to the Unites States. Attention paid to the diversity of race, ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic class of immigrant groups. The "creation" of the U.S.-Mexico border since 1848 has served to create one of the world's unique separation of nations that profoundly impact the lives of Mexican immigrants and the Chicanx community, as well as other Latinx immigrants who also must pass through the border. The social construction of the U.S.-Mexico border serves to develop a critical view of the economic, social, political, and cultural consequences of immigration. 3 hours lecture. Formerly CHST 415. (021870)
Prerequisite: CHLX 157.
This course examines the labor force participation of Latinx workers in the U.S. and Global labor market. Theoretical models of labor market inequality are also explored to acquaint students to the latest models. Empirical studies of global and U.S. market participation of Latinx populations guide students to the changing nature of those groups participation. Latinx groups examined are Chicanos, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Central Americans. 3 hours lecture. Formerly CHST 416. (021917)

Chicanx/Latinx Electives: 9 units

With the approval of the major advisor, select courses from the Chicanx/Latinx Studies (CHLX) which are not used to meet other requirements in the major.

Advising Note-Graduate Studies:

Students who are considering attending graduate school in Latinx Studies are strongly advised to take courses in Spanish.

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  • You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  • You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  • Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  • Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  • Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  • Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

Catalog Cycle:19