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The Bachelor of Science in Agriculture

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Degree MAPs page in the University Catalog or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

This major has approved GE modification(s). See below for information on how to apply these modification(s).

  • ANSC 101 is an approved major course substitution for Life Sciences (B2).
  • AGRI 482 is an approved major course substitution for Upper-Division Social Sciences.
  • AGRI 482 is also an approved GE Capstone substitution.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Literacy Requirement:

See Mathematics and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog. Writing proficiency in the major is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of a course in your major which has been designated as the Writing Proficiency (WP) course for the semester in which you take the course. Students who earn below a C- are required to repeat the course and earn a C- or higher to receive WP credit. See the Class Schedule for the designated WP courses for each semester. You must pass ENGL 130I or JOUR 130I (or equivalent) with a C- or higher before you may register for a WP course.

Course Requirements for the Major: 79-83 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree. Additional required courses, depending upon the selected option are outlined following the major core program requirements.

Major Core Program: 34 units

Lower-Division Core: 24 units

4 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Principles of operation, adjustments, calibration, and safety of wheel and track-type tractors including implements and equipment commonly used in California agriculture. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000164)
A college success course for agricultural majors new to California State University, Chico. The course will explore the academic and social opportunities and resources available to promote successful completion of the student's educational goals. 1 hour discussion. Credit/no credit grading. (000198)
Prerequisites: Completion of ELM requirement.
Summary of numerical data, elementary probability, distributions, and introduction to statistical inference. A grade of C- or higher is required for GE credit. 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (005501)
Plant structure, growth, reproduction, and responses to the environment. How humans modify plants and the environment to grow crops. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (007765)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Completion of ELM requirement, Intermediate Algebra.
A survey of the principles of chemistry, primarily for students in agriculture, industry and technology, and pre-nursing. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001826)
Prerequisites: Completion of ELM requirement; second-year high school algebra; one year high school chemistry. (One year of high school physics and one year of high school mathematics past Algebra II are recommended.)
Principles of chemistry for students in science, medical, and related professions. Atomic structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, periodic table, gases, solids, liquids, solutions, and equilibrium. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001816)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or CHEM 111 or equivalent.
A survey of organic chemistry primarily for agriculture, industry and technology, and pre-nursing students. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001828)
Prerequisites: CHEM 111 with a grade of C- or better.
A continuation of CHEM 111. Chemical energetics, rates of reaction, acids and bases, solubility, oxidation-reduction, and nuclear chemistry. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001817)

6 units selected from:

Any combination of lower division courses in Agriculture (AGRI), Agricultural Engineering Technology (AGET), Animal Science (ANSC), Plant Science (PSSC), and Agricultural Business (ABUS). Choose courses in consultation with your advisor.

Upper-Division Core: 10 units

3 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ANSC 101 or PSSC 101; CHEM 107 or CHEM 111.
Mendelian inheritance, gene structure and action, sex-related inheritance, linkage and mapping, aneuploidy, polyploidy, population and quantitative inheritance, inbreeding and heterosis. Activities feature techniques in biotechnology with agricultural applications. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (000211)
Prerequisites: Completion of lower-division core or faculty permission.
An interdisciplinary treatment of physical and biological environments used for agriculture. Historical and ecological nature of agriculture its impact on the landscape and society. Comparison of sustainable and non-sustainable agricultural practices. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000206)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, senior standing or instructor permission.
An examination of major issues confronting agriculture emphasizing critical thinking, research, and balancing complex, and often opposing views of the role of agriculture in society. The course uses group work and presentations to enhance written and oral communication skills. This is the capstone course for AGRI, ANSC, and ABUS majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (000229)

Note: AGRI 305 may be substituted for an approved elective in the Land Resource Management area of study.

Major Option Course Requirements: 45-49 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required dependent upon the option chosen. Students must select one of the following options for completion of the major course requirements.  Use the links below to jump to your chosen option.



The Option in Agricultural Science and Education: 45 units

This option prepares students for careers in the broad field of agriculture or for careers in teaching at the secondary level. The option prepares students for diverse careers in agricultural production where the integration of animal, plant, and agri-business knowledge and skills is required.

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
The role of agricultural business in the economy. Introductory economic and business principles and their application to the solution of agricultural problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (000014)
An overview, using a scientific perspective, of farm animals. Highlights anatomy and physiology of farm animals, reproduction, nutrition, animal health, animal products, animal behavior, and pertinent social issues, such as animal rights. Includes human opportunity to influence trait inheritance, population densities, and productivity. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000419)

39 units selected from:

In consultation with your advisor, select courses from the prefixes: ABUS, AGED, AGET, AGRI, ANSC, and PSSC or any of the following: CMST 330, EDTE 530, EDTE 534, EDUC 302, ENGL 471, HCSV 451, JOUR 244, JOUR 255I, JOUR 260, JOUR 341.

A maximum of 12 lower division units are allowed. Students are strongly encouraged to gain practical skills and knowledge through an approved internship or directed work experience. Courses must be selected based on the career goals of the student and should have a recognizable theme such as agricultural education, sustainability, resource management, environmental horticulture*, agricultural communications, or agricultural mechanization*.

*12 units in these areas may be transferred from a community college. Students not seeking a teaching credential are encouraged to take AGRI 490 - Agricultural Experimental Research as an elective to strengthen their analytical skills.

Teaching Credentials for Agriculture

There are two credentials available for students who wish to pursue a career as an agricultural education teacher in California: the Single Subject Teaching Credential and the Agriculture Specialist Instruction Credential. The Single Subject Teaching Credential in Agriculture authorizes the holder to teach in the classroom. Candidates who fulfill the requirements for the Agriculture Specialist Instruction Credential are prepared to teach in out-of-classroom settings such as serving as an FFA advisor and Supervised Agricultural Experience Program supervisor.

The Single Subject Teaching Credential in Agriculture includes two components; a Subject Matter Preparation program and a Professional Education program. Students can complete the Subject Matter Preparation program by completing the Option in Agricultural Science and Education. Students completing another option or major in agriculture should consult the agricultural credential advisor to identify additional course requirements. Candidates may also demonstrate subject matter competence by successfully passing the appropriate California Subject examinations for Teachers (CSET). The subject matter preparation advisor is responsible for verifying that subject matter preparation has been completed.

The Professional Preparation component of the Single Subject Teaching Credential includes professional education courses and a student teaching experience. This portion of the credential program is administered by the Department of Education within the School of Education. For prerequisites and other admission requirements for professional education programs, see the "Education" chapter of this catalog and the Focus on Teaching.

You may want to consider adding the following courses to your undergraduate program: EDTE 324, EDTE 530, EDTE 531, EDUC 302, ENGL 471, and HCSV 451. All of these courses are prerequisites for the credential program.

All credential candidates recommended by CSU, Chico are authorized to teach all students, including English language learners, in the regular classroom. You may also want to qualify for the BCLAD (Bilingual, Cross-cultural, Language, and Academic Development) emphasis if you have skills in Spanish language and culture.

The requirements for the Agriculture Specialist Instruction Credential include a series of agricultural education courses (listed below), occupational experience, and a student teaching experience. Student teaching is combined with the student teaching experience required for the Single Subject Teaching Credential in Agriculture.

If you are interested in obtaining your credentials, confer with the appropriate credential advisor(s) early in your university career. Credential advisors can assist you in planning an educational program that will prepare you for both the BS in Agriculture and the teaching credential requirements. Students pursuing this career objective should also complete the single subject program pre-requisite courses and pass the California Basic Education Skills Test (CBEST).

Agricultural Education Courses

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Objectives, nature, and scope of teaching vocational agriculture. Types of programs and career opportunities in vocational education. 3 hours lecture. (000203)
An individualized class in gaining teaching experience through observation and critique of high school students and teachers in the classroom, at FFA events, and in supervised occupational experiences. 2 hours lecture. (000204)
Up-to-date approaches in integrated program development based on occupational opportunities and community needs. Philosophy, organization, and administration of agricultural education programs. Development of curriculum, supervised occupational experience, Future Farmers of America (FFA), and summer programs. 2 hours seminar. (000220)
Prerequisites: AGED 201 or faculty permission.
Preparation for student teaching in agriculture. Orientation to classroom situations. Development of plans for teaching, including daily lessons and unit plans, utilization of source information, and resources. Class demonstration in teaching procedures, analysis, and evaluation. 2 hours seminar. (000208)
Prerequisites: AGET 120, AGET 150 or equivalent.
Curriculum development and methods of teaching and motivating students in agricultural mechanics. 2 hours seminar, 3 hours laboratory. (000230)

45 units of required subject matter competency may be obtained by completing courses in the areas of:

  • Agricultural Business: 9 units. Recommended: ABUS 101*, ABUS 261, ABUS 321
  • Agricultural Mechanics: 8 units. Recommended: AGET 120, AGET 150*
  • Animal Science: 8 units. Recommended: ANSC 101*, ANSC 230
  • Plant Science: 8 units. Recommended: PSSC 101*, PSSC 250
  • Natural Resources: 3 units. Recommended: AGRI 331*

*Required in either the core or in the option.

Plus 9 units of additional courses in one of the above areas (a specialization). This credential requirement may be met using coursework in the major and in the option.

Students are strongly encouraged to gain practical skills and knowledge through an approved internship or directed work experience in areas where additional experience is needed to become a successful agricultural teacher. With the approval of your advisor, single subject credential program pre-requisite courses may be used as electives in this option.

Agricultural Communications

Students wishing to pursue a career in agricultural communications are encouraged to take the following courses as part of their option electives. Agricultural communications prepares students to enter the field by blending agriculture, journalism, and communication studies.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Effective oral communication. Introduction to human communication theory. Practice in gathering, organizing, and presenting material in speeches to persuade, inform, and interest. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (002206)
This course introduces students to the communication studies major or minor. It reviews and discusses the major theories, research, and related principles of the field to create general awareness for students new to the communication discipline and emphasizes the practical and professional applications of the field, enabling students to make connections among the discipline, their daily life, and potential career choices. 3 hours lecture. (002001)
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of JOUR 260 for Journalism majors.
This course is also offered as POLS 244 .
A survey of public relations: problems and issues, organization and operations, skills and techniques, careers and opportunities. 3 hours lecture. (001995)
The mass media are changing more rapidly now than at any time in the past century, and this course gives a context to those changes and provides an overview of what citizens need to know for understanding the role of the mass media in their public lives. Students explore the structure of media organizations; the professional and ethical values of journalists; the needs, desires, and influences of culture on media consumers; and the impact of changing technologies - both visual and written - on public relations and traditional news gathering. This includes critical analysis of the relationship of journalism and society and their effect on democracy, as well as the psychological, political, economic, and cultural values of citizens. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education course. (021263)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130.
Techniques of information gathering and writing for various audiences in the mass media. Required course for the Options in News-Editorial and Public Relations. Students must earn a grade of C or higher to advance to subsequent writing courses in the Department of Journalism. Students who do not receive at least a C may repeat the course. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (004838)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130I or JOUR 130I (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, JOUR 244, JOUR 260.
Principles and practices of writing styles for public relations. Emphasis will be on writing tailored to an organization's communication needs. Required for majors. Journalism majors in the public relations option who earn below a C- in JOUR 341 are required to repeat the course and are expected to earn a C- or higher to receive writing proficiency credit. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (004844)

The Option in Crops, Horticulture, and Land Resource Management: 46-49 units

This option prepares students to manage agricultural enterprises for the production of plant crops for human and animal consumption, for the protection of these crops and resources against pests (insects, diseases, weeds, vertebrates), and for the stewardship of their natural resources (soil, water, air, and biota). The option emphasizes sustainable land use and crop production practices. Career opportunities may be found in the agricultural production industry, in agricultural research, and in agricultural consulting, assistance, and regulation.

Option Core: 25 units

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Students design and execute applied agriculture research projects that seek to improve the management of agricultural enterprises. Students learn the most common experimental designs for agricultural research, utilize computer programs to analyze and interpret experimental data and further develop scientific writing skills. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour discussion. (000223)
Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or CHEM 111.
Soil biology, fertility, chemistry, physical properties, taxonomy and their applications to agricultural management and environmental enhancement. Relationships of soils to the world food supply and population. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007776)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
The role of agricultural business in the economy. Introductory economic and business principles and their application to the solution of agricultural problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (000014)
Introduction to the principles of farm accounting, farm business record keeping, agribusiness management, financial analysis, and enterprise budgeting. 2 hours lecture, 1 hour discussion. (000020)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An overview, using a scientific perspective, of farm animals. Highlights anatomy and physiology of farm animals, reproduction, nutrition, animal health, animal products, animal behavior, and pertinent social issues, such as animal rights. Includes human opportunity to influence trait inheritance, population densities, and productivity. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000419)
An introduction to the nutrition of domestic and wild animals with emphasis on appropriate nutrition for various activities. A survey of the integration of feed production and animal production systems. Computer formulation and analysis of diets to achieve desired performance levels of animals. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (000434)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: PSSC 250 or instructor permission.
Course examines the capacity of the soil to function within natural and managed ecosystems to sustain plant/animal productivity, maintain or enhance water and air quality, and support human health and habitation. Soil quality factors include biological, physical, and chemical soil properties. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (007808)
Prerequisites: PSSC 250.
Properties of soils, fertilizers, and plant materials. Soil amendments and soil reaction effects on plants. Fertilizer usage. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007840)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: NSCI 102 or BIOL 153; CHEM 108 or CHEM 270; or faculty permission.
Functions in higher plants; water and soil relations, photosynthesis, respiration, enzyme action, and growth. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (001181)
Prerequisites: BIOL 152 or faculty permission.
Principles of plant classification with field study of local flora, emphasizing the higher plants and their phylogenetic relationships. 2 hours discussion, 6 hours laboratory. (001198)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Survey of microcomputer applications for agribusiness management, emphasizing personnel productivity software, including database manager, advanced spreadsheet, and electronic communication software. 3 hours lecture. (000025)
Prerequisites: ABUS 101 or equivalent.
The application of economic and management principles to the planning, control, and organization of agribusiness firms. Linear programming applications, decision trees, inventory control, and equipment replacement. 3 hours lecture. (000027)
Prerequisites: ABUS 101.
Principles and techniques of farm and ranch appraisal. Valuation of farm and rural resources. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000031)
Prerequisites: AGRI 331 or faculty permission.
A study of sustainable management practices in the context of agricultural land stewardship. The development of practical skills and understanding paramount to leadership and management of personal and professional activities. The focus is on identifying available resources, clarifiying goals, developing action plans, and promoting communication, savvy monitoring, and decision making that expedite progress toward a thriving enterprise and contribute to a sustainable community. Case studies, community activities, and discussion explore the impact of management decisions on progress toward desired goals. 3 hours lecture. (000225)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: AGET 150 or faculty permission.
Directed work and discussion on all fall aspects of field and row crop production practices applicable to northern California. Students are encouraged to enroll in PSSC 309B after this course. 1 hour discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (007773)
Prerequisite: AGET 150.
Directed work and discussion on all spring aspects of field and row crop production practices applicable to northern California. 1 hour discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (007788)
Directed work and discussion on all aspects of plant production in the greenhouse environment. Plant species may include ornamentals, crops, and California wildland natives. 1 hour discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (007791)
Prerequisites: Junior standing, faculty permission.
This course is an internship offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Internship with private industry, state, federal, international, or non-profit organization. Selected topic must be in a Plant and Soil Science Option area. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (007824)

PSSC 389 must be taken for 2 units.

Area of Study: 21-24 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required depending on the area of study chosen. Students must select one of the following areas of study for completion of the major course requirements. Courses must be approved in advance by the academic advisor.

Crops and Horticulture Area of Study: 24 units

1 course required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or CHEM 111; PSSC 250.
An examination of materials and application methods used for protecting the health of plants in a manner that is safe for the environment, applicator, and consumer. Comprises the laws and regulations, safety, application, properties, mode of action, toxicology, and environmental impacts of pesticides, fertilizers, and other rmaterials used in agriculture. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007806)

Crop Production

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: PSSC 101 or PSSC 250 or faculty permission.
Design, management, and evaluation of landscape and agricultural irrigation systems for efficient water use. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000170)
Greenhouse construction, environment, and management practices, including heating and cooling, irrigation, fertilization, and pest control. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007818)
This course covers the requirements and cultural practices needed for maximizing yields of annual field crops. Principles affecting growth development and management will be covered. For field experience, students are advised to enroll in PSSC 309A/PSSC 309B. 3 hours lecture. (007810)
Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.
Managing and optimizing the fruit and nut production system. Selection of planting sites and varieties, tree training and pruning, pollination, thinning, irrigation, mineral nutrition, and pest management are included. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007820)

Agricultural Pests and Control

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: BIOL 153 or PSSC 101 or faculty permission.
Study of plant pathology encompassing parasitism and disease in plants, pathogen attack strategies, diseased plant physiology, plant defense mechanisms, environmental effects on disease and descriptions of diseases and treatments. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001194)
A survey of the structure and function of insects, leading to a fundamental understanding of applied insect ecology and taxonomy. Particular emphasis is placed on arthropod species of economic importance to humans. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007797)
Prerequisites: AGRI 331.
Identification, modes of spread, and population ecology of weeds and other invasive plant species. Biological, cultural, mechanical, and chemical control of weeds and invasive species. Methods of crop/vegetation management to control and reduce weed populations. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007801)
Prerequisites: AGRI 331; BIOL 446, PSSC 340, or PSSC 343.
An introduction to the principles and mechanisms of integrated management of insect pests, plant pathogens, and weeds, dealing with such areas as the agro-ecosystem, population dynamics, and specific approaches to pest management. 3 hours lecture. (007834)

8-9 units selected from:

To fulfill the requirements of this option, select additional courses from the option core and this area of study.

Land Resource Management Area of Study: 21 units

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; BIOL 152 or faculty permission.
Some taxonomic background is recommended. Interrelationships among living organisms, field observations of such phenomena. Application of quantitative and qualitative methods to the interpretation of ecological phenomena. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (001206)
Prerequisites: PSSC 250 or faculty permission.
An examination of the factors of soil formation, criteria and systems of soil classification. The laboratory consists of five all-day field trips. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007837)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Application of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in agriculture and natural resource management. Identification and delineation of locations and areas; collection, analysis, storage, and retrieval of site and time specific data for agriculture and natural resource management and monitoring. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000168)
This course provides an introduction to topics and technology in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course will combine a conceptual discussion of topics with practical exercises. Both the theory and practice of GIS analysis will be presented. Formerly GEOG 319. 3 hours lecture. (021439)
Introduction to essential geographic problem solving techniques which include: data collection, analysis, and presentation of spatial information. Techniques include map measurement and interpretation, aerial photo analysis, field observations with GPS, introductory geographic information systems, computer cartography, summary of numerical data, elementary probability, distributions, and introduction to statistical inference. This is an inductory tools course for students majoring in geography, the natural and earth sciences, and in such applied fields as planning and recreation. Several software analysis packages are introduced. 3 hours lecture. (015867)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: GEOG 101, GEOS 102, PSSC 101, or PSSC 250; GEOG 211, GEOG 219, or AGET 340.
Systematic analysis of the origin and development of landforms. Emphasis is on the study of geomorphic processes using maps, air photos, and field data. 3 hours discussion. (003926)
Prerequisites: GEOS 101 or GEOS 102 or consent of instructor.
Geologic setting of California and historical development of its geologic provinces. The impact of earthquakes, volcanic activity, coastal erosion, and earth resources on California. Field trip required. 3 hours discussion. (004085)

9 units selected from:

To fulfill the requirements of this option, select additional courses from the option core and this area of study in consultation with your advisor.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  1. You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  2. You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  3. Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  4. Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  5. Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  6. Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

Catalog Cycle:14