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The Bachelor of Arts in International Relations

The International Relations major at CSU, Chico emphasizes a varied interest in politics, history, geography, languages, economics, and culture (art, music, and literature). The major is designed to prepare students for an entry-level administrative position in government, business, or the non-profit sector. Many International Relations majors combine the degree with other majors and minors. Typically, these are foreign languages and international studies, although a minor in International Business is becoming increasingly popular as a related skill. International Relations majors who are particularly successful go to graduate school. An internship in Washington, DC, is highly recommended, ideally in the semester following completion of academic course work. International Relations majors at CSU, Chico are encouraged to spend a semester or year studying at another institution. These schools may be in the United States, through the National Student Exchange Program, or abroad, through International Programs.

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Degree MAPs page in the University Catalog or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

  • LAST 495, POLS 471B, and RELS 482 are approved GE Capstone substitutions.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Literacy Requirement:

See Mathematics and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog. Writing proficiency in the major is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of a course in your major which has been designated as the Writing Proficiency (WP) course for the semester in which you take the course. Students who earn below a C- are required to repeat the course and earn a C- or higher to receive WP credit. See the Class Schedule for the designated WP courses for each semester. You must pass ENGL 130I or JOUR 130I (or equivalent) with a C- or higher before you may register for a WP course.

Course Requirements for the Major: 39-56 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree.

Major Core Program: 30-31 units

5 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher.
An introduction to the discipline of political science, with emphasis on the major controversy of substance and method therein. Should be taken at the beginning of the junior year. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (007495)
This course covers use of computers and the Internet in political science research. 3 hours independent study. Credit/no credit grading. (007496)
Concepts in international politics, with emphasis on the analysis of contemporary global issues. Recommended for secondary teachers. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007500)
The classical roots of western political philosophy and their relationship to contemporary political theory. 3 hours seminar. (007279)
Prerequisites: POLS 341.
Analysis of the dynamics of international politics, with emphasis on the following theories and concepts: images, decision-making, power, the state, nationalism, balance of power, international system, war, alliances, and imperialism. International Relations majors: 3 hours lecture. (007559)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An introductory survey of macroeconomic analysis. Use of fundamental economic concepts to analyze the over-all economy. Determination of gross national product, rates of unemployment, problems of inflation, recession, and the use of governmental policies. Discussion of current problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002636)
An introductory survey of microeconomic analysis. Analysis of individual economic units: household, firms, and markets. Analysis of individual decision making. Supply and demand analysis. Type of market organization: competition, oligopoly, and monopoly. Discussion of current problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002638)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This is a comparative politics course, exploring the concept of political development, with a focus on developing nations. Political development, or the capacity and strength of government, is an essential, but often neglected component of development. In this course, we explore different definitions and conceptions of political development, and issues associated with political development. These issues include ethnic conflict, corruption, political upheavals such as coups and revolutions, and democratization. Students read several seminal texts in comparative politics, as well as current empirical research. 3 hours lecture. (007530)
Analysis of the international political economy and industrial- post-industrial societies. Specific focus on the internationalization of capitalism and major institutions of the international political economy in the post-Cold War era; the competing models of North Amerian, European, and Asian political economies; trade, investment and security issues among industrial nations; and relationship of industrial nations' policy to the political economy of the developing world. 3 hours lecture. (007539)

2-3 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A series of presentations on a wide variety of topics of international concern. Lectures, debates, and panel discussions on areas of current international importance. 1 hour lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (004875)
Prerequisites: POLS 340A.
Individual and group research on an assigned country and its U.N. policy positions plus mock session activities to prepare delegates to represent that country at the National Model United Nations Conference held in New York City during the spring semester. Either attendance at the New York City conference or a 15-page research paper on a U.N. agenda topic is required. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (007499)
Prerequisites: POLS 340A, POLS 340B.
This course directs students through the process of being an officer in the Model United Nations (MUN) program. As an officer, students have the opportunity to take on significant responsibilities in the management and mentoring process of the MUN program. Must have successfully completed at least two semesters of Model United Nations courses previously and have received both the recommendation of peers within the program and the faculty advisor's permission. Enrollment in this course is required for both the fall and spring semesters. In addition, each officer will have responsibilities over winter break intersession. Must participate in MUN conferences in both the fall and spring semester. 1 hour seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 12.0 units. (021165)
This course is a simulation on selected topics in international relations. 3 hours independent study. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (007512)
This course is for special topics offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and may vary from term to term and be different for different sections. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered. 3 hours lecture. (007522)
This course is an independent study of special problems offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (007523)
Prerequisite: POLS 341 (may be taken concurrently).
This course involves an internship in selected government agencies or with an elected official, political party organization, interest group, or media outlet that is concerned with international organizations, non-governmental organizations, or domestic agencies concerned with international issues, foreign policy, or governmental action. 9 hours independent study. Credit/no credit grading. (021293)

Note: INST 301 may be taken twice to fulfill this requirement.

9 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
The political dynamics of selected developing countries. Major emphasis is on problems of poverty, colonialism, comparative political structures and behavior, imperialism, and international relations. The course also focuses on tensions in the political culture between traditional and non-traditional values in developing societies. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (015554)
Introduction to the United Nations, its procedures and current issues on its agenda to prepare delegates to participate in the a Model United Nations Conference held during the fall semester. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (007498)
Course analyzes post-World War II American foreign policy. It examines the origins and development of the cold war, with attention to nuclear capabilities, the growth of national security bureaucracy, and the impact on American society. Special attention is given to the decision-making process as well as to theories of personality, organizational behavior, and the political process as these affect the cold war basis of American foreign policy. 3 hours lecture. (007503)
This is a comparative politics course, exploring the concept of political development, with a focus on developing nations. Political development, or the capacity and strength of government, is an essential, but often neglected component of development. In this course, we explore different definitions and conceptions of political development, and issues associated with political development. These issues include ethnic conflict, corruption, political upheavals such as coups and revolutions, and democratization. Students read several seminal texts in comparative politics, as well as current empirical research. 3 hours lecture. (007530)
This is a comparative politics course, exploring the politics of the People's Republic of China. The course focuses on contemporary Chinese politics, and provides on a very brief history of Chinese politics prior to the 1949 revolution. Course topics include the formal and informal political institutions of China, economic reform, rural politics and village elections, corruption, inequality, public opinion, and Chinese foreign policy. 3 hours lecture. (007535)
Analysis of the international political economy and industrial- post-industrial societies. Specific focus on the internationalization of capitalism and major institutions of the international political economy in the post-Cold War era; the competing models of North Amerian, European, and Asian political economies; trade, investment and security issues among industrial nations; and relationship of industrial nations' policy to the political economy of the developing world. 3 hours lecture. (007539)
This course is also offered as MJIS 418 .
This course will examine the Israeli political system from its early development to the present. The class will focus on the Zionist ideology of the founders and the transformation of that ideology during the state-building period. Israeli political institutions will be examined along with historical and contemporary political conflicts, the vagaries of the peace process, and Israeli-American relations. 3 hours lecture. (005865)
Analysis of the development and activities of various types of international organizations, including the United Nations, multinational corporations, OPEC, the Common Market, the IMF, the World Bank, and such non-governmental organizations as Amnesty International and Greenpeace. 3 hours lecture. (007561)
Analyzes the foreign policies of the Middle Eastern nations. Emphasizes Arab-Israeli and inter-Arab dynamics, the impacts of Muslim culture, sectarian strife, and the roles of external forces, including the superpowers. 3 hours lecture. (007565)
This course is also offered as INST 446D .
3 hours lecture. (004873)
A multi-dimensional and cross-disciplinary study of the historical and contemporary phenomenon of terrorism and counterterrorist policy. Focus is on terrorism as different from war, the sources and practitioners of terrorism, and the multiple rationales for its use. Study will include both domestic and international terrorism, private and state as well as national and international counterterrorist policy. Particular attention on the threat of terrorism to liberal democracy and development of liberal democratic counterterrorist policy. Selection choice for the Option in Political Affairs. 3 hours lecture. (007575)
This course is a seminar on selected topics in international relations. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (007576)
Study in political science related to specialized subjects of topical and current interest. Intensive reading. Topics may be offered in American Government, Comparative Government, Political Behavior, Political Theory, International Relations, Public Law, or Public Administration. 1 hour seminar. (007665)

Language Competence: 0-16 units

0-4 courses required:

Two years of a foreign language or the equivalent of the fourth semester of a college-level program (e.g., SPAN 202). Language units may be waived with demonstrated proficiency in a language.

Areas of Concentration: 9 units

9 units selected from:

Students are required to choose 9 units of upper-division elective courses outside of International Relations that provide a deepened understanding of a region of the world or a conceptual approach within the field of International Relations. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the International Relations Advisor.

Students studying abroad can fulfill this 9 unit requirement while studying abroad and will need to consult with the International Relations Advisor to develop an appropriate group of courses.

Geographical areas of concentration include: Africa, Asia, Europe, Canada, Latin America, Middle East, or Pacific Rim.

Conceptual areas of concentration include: Development, Environment, Trade Policy, or Security.

Below are some examples of common areas of concentration chosen by students including lists of course that have fulfilled this requirement. Students are not limited to this list, and each student must meet with the International Relations Advisor to determine an Area of Concentration that best meets his/her needs.

Latin America

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as POLS 321 .
An interdisciplinary survey of the politics of Central America and the Caribbean Basin. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (005381)
Prerequisites: Completion of the lower-division GE Pathway Foundation Physical Sciences and GE Pathway Foundation Life Sciences or faculty permission.
LAST 351 explores the natural and human-modified environments of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. It introduces students to the biological and physical processes that create the natural environments of the region and examines the complex interactions between people and these environments, both past and present. This course is designed to be the Area B course in the General Education Upper-Division Theme I: Mexico and Central America. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (005379)
An interdisciplinary examination of how Mexican literature and the arts reflect the social and cultural roots of the people of Mexcio. This course is a component of the General Education Upper-Division Thematic Program on Mexico and Central America. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (005377)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, LAST 110.
An in-depth, interdisciplinary seminar that examines selected topics in Latin American culture and society, past and present, through critical reading of, and commentary on, recent scholarship devoted to the region. Readings may include Spanish language sources. Topics vary by semester. Required for majors and minors. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (005384)

Economics

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ECON 103.
Microeconomics examines the economic behavior of individual decision-making agents, such as consumers, resource owners, and firms. The goal of this course is to build a theoretical foundation to study various applied fields in economics and management (such as international trade, public finance, labor, or environmental economics). Topics include consumer theory, production and cost analysis, theories of the firm and markets, and welfare economics. 3 hours discussion. (002647)
Prerequisites: ECON 102.
An extension of macroeconomic concepts and principles relating to short-term stabilization policies, long-term growth questions, fiscal and monetary theory and policy, international dimensions, and problems of inflation, deflation, unemployment, productivity, and growth. Theories and models are used to examine, develop, and analyze macroeconomics issues, problems, and policies. 3 hours discussion. (002648)
Prerequisites: ECON 102.
Financial markets and financial institutions. Impact of money and credit on the economy. Central banking and monetary policy. International finance. Macroeconomics and monetary theory will be emphasized. (Can be substituted for ECON 102 in the major.) 3 hours lecture. (002660)
Prerequisites: ECON 103.
An overview of the economics of government regulation with emphasis on the formulation of regulatory policy, alternative methods of regulation, and the economic impacts of such policy. Topics may include environmental regulation, energy conservation policy, consumer protection, antitrust policy, and a critical evaluation of market-based regulatory policy. 3 hours lecture. (002668)
An analysis of the costs and benefits of environmental preservation. Systems for creating economic incentives for pollution abatement. Criteria for establishing optimum pollution abatement, including efficiency, safety, and sustainability standards. Impacts of population growth on global environmental problems. Alternative energy use patterns and their impact on energy markets and global environmental health. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002671)
Prerequisites: ECON 103 or instructor permission.
A study on the theory of international finance and trade. In-depth analysis of what determines trade flows, gains from trade, and the international flow of capital and technology. Focus on international trade policies and institutions and a survey of current trade problems and conflicts. 3 hours lecture. (002672)
Prerequisites: ECON 103.
This course surveys theoretical approaches and policy options to the problems of development and underdevelopment in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Agricultural transformations, industrial development, balance of payments problems, the role of foreign aid, direct foreign investment, the economic role of international institutions such as the World Bank, and other related topics are included in this course. 3 hours lecture. (002673)
Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 102 or faculty permission.
A survey and analysis of economic development in the Pacific Rim and its linkages with politics, history, society, and foreign policy. Topics covered include trade, tariffs, subsidies, balance of payments, savings, investment, government deficits, environment, agricultural economics, and economic growth. 3 hours discussion. (002674)

Political Science

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.
An examination of major political problems challenging America today. Emphasis on class discussion of controversial topics involving political policy in the context of the study of political science. 3 hours lecture. (015555)
This course is also offered as LAST 321 .
An interdisciplinary survey of the politics of Central America and the Caribbean Basin. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (005381)
This course is also offered as WMST 324I .
Analysis of the roles of women in politics; volunteer, candidate, elected official. Considers politics of the women's movement and women's issues. 3 hours lecture.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education course. (007491)
Analysis of the history and development of the American federal system and the role of state and local governments, with special emphasis directed to the government and politics of California. Among the major topics considered: the state and local political systems; the political environment; party, interest group, citizen, and media inputs; and current problems and changing functions affecting state and local governments. 3 hours lecture. (007524)
An exploration of campaigns and elections in the United States with emphasis on the activities and strategies of candidates for office, the behavior of voters, the role of political parties, interest groups, and the media, and the financing of campaigns. 3 hours lecture. (007549)
This course is a seminar on selected topics in international relations. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (007576)
Investigation and analysis of the political nature of the environmental crisis in the United States and the development of legal and administrative mechanisms for handling environmental problems. 3 hours lecture. (007596)
Critical examination of the process of policy formation in American governments. Relationship of executive, legislative, and judicial branches in policy formation. A significant policy area will be examined, with emphasis on both statutory and constitutional bases and the social/political factors influencing policy development. 3 hours lecture. (007607)
Prerequisites: POLS 421, POLS 471A.
An examination of the approaches, models, methods, and concepts of public policy analysis, with special emphasis on program evaluation, research methodologies, implementation problems, and policy evaluation models. Recommended for political science and public administration majors and minors. 3 hours lecture. (007608)

French

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: FREN 202 or equivalent.
See description below. 3 hours discussion. (003805)
Prerequisites: FREN 202 or equivalent.
See description below. 3 hours discussion. (003806)
Prerequisites: FREN 202 or equivalent.
An introduction to French history and geography as well as French art, literature, philosophy, education, economy, social classes, and politics. 3 hours discussion. (003812)
Prerequisites: FREN 301, FREN 302, or FREN 303.
A survey of French literature with special emphasis on genres, literary techniques, and methods of analysis, early French literature to the French Revolution. 3 hours discussion. (003815)
Prerequisites: Six units from FREN 301, FREN 302, FREN 303; FREN 340 or FREN 345.
Study of the important trends of the period as seen through representative novels and plays. 3 hours discussion. (003818)
Prerequisites: Six units from FREN 301, FREN 302, FREN 303; FREN 340 or FREN 345.
Varying content may include writers of prose, poetry, and theater and literary movements such as surrealism, existentialism, the New Novel, and feminism. 3 hours discussion. (003820)
An introduction to French cinema as a narrative form, with emphasis on key films and directors from various periods of French film history. The class is taught in English. All films have English subtitles. 3 hours discussion. (003813)

History

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
The course covers the dramatic events of the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917 and the evolution of Soviet and Russian history up to the present. Emphasis is on the social origins of the Russian Revolution, how a revolution for social democracy gave rise to one- party rule, and the chain of events which placed the Soviet Union on a path leading eventually to its demise in 1991 and the recasting of politics and society. 3 hours seminar. (004530)
An historical survey of pre-Columbian and colonial Latin America, with emphasis on Aztec and Inca societies, Iberia's military, economic, and spiritual conquest, and the ways in which diverse colonial subjects resisted, adapted to, and assimilated colonial rule. Concludes by considering popular and elite culture in the late colonial period and tensions leading toward independence. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004568)
A survey of Latin America since independence from Iberia, highlighting the chaotic years of post-independence state building, the region's integration into the global capitalist economy and the age of mass politics and revolutionary ferment after 1930. The final weeks focus on Latin America's experience with military dictatorship and current transitions to democracy. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004495)
This course explores tradition and new trends in 18th and 19th century China, the Western impact and the Chinese response, the nationalist and the communist movements, changes in values and the society after 1949, and the ongoing economic reforms. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004661)
This course explores twentieth-century social revolutions in Mexico, Cuba, Chile and Nicaragua. Additional consideration will be given to more recent phenomena in Venezuela and the Mexican state of Chiapas. Evaluates the role played by class, ethnicity, and gender in these movements and considers whether the driving force of social revolution in Latin America is Marxism or nationalist/anti-imperialism. 3 hours seminar. (004647)

German

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: GERM 202 or equivalent.
Study and practice of the phonology, morphology, and syntax of modern German. Contrastive analysis of the sounds of German and English. 3 hours discussion. (004215)
Prerequisites: GERM 202 or equivalent.
A survey of some of the great figures and periods of German art, literature, music, and public life which have made significant contributions to the development of civilization in German-speaking countries. 3 hours discussion. (004216)
Prerequisites: GERM 202 or equivalent.
A survey of the development of prose, drama, and lyric after Goethe and the Romantics to the twentieth century, including representative authors of poetic realism and naturalism. 3 hours discussion. (004228)
Prerequisites: GERM 202 or equivalent.
Readings in prose, drama, and lyric of the Expressionists, Rilke, Mann, Hesse, Kafka, Brecht, and others. 3 hours discussion. (004229)
Class taught in English. All films have English subtitles. Historical survey of representative films from the post-war era, the New German, and feminist cinema, including study of their cultural and social significance, with a component of significant film aesthetics and theories from Kluge to contemporary feminist film theories. 3 hours discussion. (004224)
Class is taught in English; films in German with English subtitles. A historical survey of representative films and cinema cultures of Austria and Switzerland, and of the former two German states, East and West Germany from the 1980's to the present; including study of their cultural and social significance with a component of aesthetic changes in united Germany's cinematic culture after 1990, and a representation of Germany's multicultural society. 3 hours discussion. (020681)
This is an exploration of the fundamental concepts of human biological, social, and cultural evolution. It is a comparative study of adaptation, social organization, religious and other ideological systems in contemporary non-Western societies. With a multidisciplinary approach, the course covers the biological basis of human social behavior, fossil evidence for human evolution, and relevant ethnographic and archaeological evidence of human social evolution. This course is required for Liberal Studies majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (009062)

Spanish

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: SPAN 301 or faculty permission.
A survey of the cultural, social, economic, and political heritage of Latin America and its evolution into contemporary Latin American society. 3 hours discussion. (009155)
Prerequisites: SPAN 301.
Introduces students to the study of Hispanic literature and culture, and develops their skills in language comprehension and analysis of prose, poetry, and drama. The works studied will be short stories, full-length plays, and Hispanic-American narrative and lyric poetry. SPAN 341 and SPAN 342 are required of all majors and count as electives for the minor. Either fulfills the prerequisite for all other upper-division literature courses. 3 hours discussion. (009140)
Prerequisites: SPAN 301.
Introduces students to the study of Hispanic literature and culture, and develops their skills in language comprehension and analysis of prose, poetry, and drama. Works studied will be the novel, one-act plays, and Peninsular Spanish narrative and lyric poetry. SPAN 342 is required of all majors and fulfills the prerequisite for all other upper-division literature courses. 3 hours discussion. (009141)
This course is for special topics offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and may vary from term to term and be different for different sections. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered. 1 hour lecture. (009157)
Prerequisites: SPAN 301; SPAN 341 or SPAN 342; or faculty permission.
Women in Spanish-speaking society. An approach to culture via a study of women as literary subjects and as writers. The idealization and reality of their existence as reflected through Spanish and Latin American literature. 3 hours discussion. (009182)
Prerequisites: SPAN 301; SPAN 341 or SPAN 342; or faculty permission.
Students will consider the elements that constitute literary and cinematic masterpieces by examining films based on a variety of texts: epic poetry, drama, short story, legend, novel, zarzuela, and filmscript. The films will represent the cultural and linguistic diversity in areas of Spain and Latin America. 3 hours discussion. (009183)

Italian

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ITAL 202 or equivalent.
Survey of some of the greatest figures in literature, philosophy, science, art, music, politics, geography, and history of Italy. 3 hours discussion. (005103)
Prerequisites: ITAL 201 or faculty permission.
Through prose, poetry, film, music, art, and historical accounts, this course surveys contemporary Italian social, political, and cultural life from the fall of Fascism to the present. 3 hours lecture. (020849)
Prerequisites: Department permission.
This course is for special topics offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and may vary from term to term and be different for different sections. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered. 3 hours lecture. (005109)
The Italian Cinema as a creative art form has had a profound and lasting impact on world cinematography. The course will include Italian film history and the study of major trends and techniques. The relationship of the cinema to socio-political, economic, and literary events in Italy and the world will be studied: Neorealism, The Felliniesque, Spaghetti Western, Commedia all'Italiana, and more recent trends. The class is taught in English and all films have English subtitles. 3 hours discussion. (005111)

Japanese

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Practice of conversational patterns in a casual format aiming at improving fluency in day-to-day interactions with native Japanese speakers. In an attempt to provide real conversational settings, there are hands-on activities such as singing, cooking, observing tea a ceremony, watching Japanese television programs, etc. 3 hours discussion. (020181)
This course is taught in English. It examines a variety of Japanese films involving the following cultural themes: roles of men and women, society, history, politics, education, theater, sports, music, industry, comedy, etc. In the process, the students examine and analyze the myths and realities of Japanese people as portrayed in the films. Discussions are designed to increase students' awareness of intercultural communication, to foster their preparedness for functioning in the complex order of Japanese society. All films have English subtitles. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (020182)
Prerequisites: Department permission.
This course is for special topics offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and may vary from term to term and be different for different sections. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered. 3 hours lecture. (005340)
Prerequisites: JAPN 202 or faculty permission.
This course is for students who have attained an advanced level of fluency in Japanese or are native speakers of Japanese. While this course explores a variety of teaching methodologies, students analyze the gap between syntax and semantics to formulate concise explanations and develop skills best suited for teaching Japenese to non-native learners. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours supervision. (020183)
Prerequisites: Department permission.
This course is for special topics offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and may vary from term to term and be different for different sections. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 99.0 units. (020012)
Western philosophical thought from the Renaissance through Kant, including Bacon, Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. 3 hours lecture. (007182)

Business

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ACCT 202.
Accounting concepts, standards, and procedures for the international business environment. Topics include International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), accounting for foreign currency translations, hedging foreign exchange risk, translation of foreign currency, financial statements, accounting for changing prices, international consolidation of financial statements, segment reports, international taxation and transfer pricing, performance evaluation, international auditing, and corporate governance. 3 hours lecture. (000086)
Prerequisites: ACCT 201, ECON 103.
An introduction to financial management, providing a background in the areas of financial institutions, the time value of money, analysis of financial statements, working capital management, financial structure of the firm, capital budgeting, and related tools of financial analysis. 3 hours lecture. (003729)
Using a combination of theory and application, this course focuses on the human side of organizations, including issues of 1) making good decisions, 2) enhancing performance, 3) steering through a turbulent global environment, 4) combining and unifying multiple business functions and 5) enabling change. Students gain an understanding of management and how and why organizations are structured. The themes of quality, technology, ethics, and adaptation are emphasized. 3 hours lecture. (005704)
This course surveys human resource management practices needed for effective performance by every manager and employee. The focus of the course is on processes used to effectively recruit, select, develop, evaluate, reward, and ensure the safety of employees in order to attract and retain the best possible workforce in any organization. This course provides students with an understanding of workforce diversity, investigates ethical issues, and explores the international context of HRM. 3 hours lecture. (005690)
This course explores creative, integrative approaches to conflict resolution. Includes bargaining games, role-plays, cases, issues in conflict management, interpersonal influence processes, cultural, and ethical implications of bargaining problems and personal negotiating styles. 3 hours lecture. (005703)
Prerequisites: MGMT 303.
An examination of the strategy, infrastructure, and business processes that foster effectiveness in global organizations. An analysis of the impact of cross-cultural differences on managerial issues such as motivation, discipline, work and leisure values, and collaboration. An analysis of issues in the global business environment, including the impact of labor conventions, legal systems, technology transfer, ethics, and e-commerce. 3 hours lecture. (005707)
Nature and functions of marketing systems and marketing in the individual firm. Study of the marketing mix, marketing institutions, and the environments in which marketing decisions are made. 3 hours lecture. (005872)
Prerequisites: MKTG 371.
Study of the changes in the marketplace created by the increasing utilization of technological tools to perform traditional marketing functions. The course provides insight into strategies and tactics which can be used to implement and manage electronic marketing initiatives. 3 hours lecture. (005884)
Prerequisites: MKTG 371 for Marketing Option students and OSCM 302 for non-Marketing Option students.
This course is also offered as OSCM 471 .
The course includes a study of distribution and its role in the marketing system, economics of distribution, financing competing carriers, rate determination, government regulation subsidization, carrier organization, operation, and traffic control. 3 hours lecture. (005878)
Prerequisites: MKTG 305, Senior Standing.
A study of all aspects of marketing unique to international business. Examines the impact of cultures, ethics, history, politics, and social customs on marketing thinking and practices worldwide. 3 hours discussion. (005879)

Psychology

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: One course from GE Pathway Foundation Physical Sciences.
Analysis of present and long-term global energy crises; coverage of scientific concepts needed to understand energy and its environmental interactions; in-depth examination of alternative energy sources and their environmental impact. 3 hours lecture. (004149)
This course explores the fundamental relationships between brain function, mental states and consciousness, and human behavior. Attention is given to the influence of brain research on artifical intelligence, neural networks, and computer technology, and to the current metaphor of brain as computer. The course focus is on basic brain processes involved in sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, learning and memory, and language and consciousness. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007919)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, PSYC 101, PSYC 261.
An introduction to basic processes involved in brain function and an overview of the biological bases of behaviors such as sleep, biological rhythms, sex, emotions, learning and memory, language, laterality, and psychophysiological states such as depression, anxiety disorders, and schizophrenia. The laboratory includes the study of neuroanatomy and experiments on topics such as EEG, GSR, biofeedback, hemisphere specialization, and cardiovascular reactivity. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007901)
A review of the major theories, phenomena, and research associated with the structure and function of the sensory and perceptual systems. Primary emphasis is on the visual and auditory systems, but gustation, olfaction, and skin perception are also reviewed. 3 hours lecture. (007985)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, PSYC 101, PSYC 261, or faculty permission.
An in-depth examination of current research and theory in cognition. Topics include attention, memory models, language, problem solving, creativity, reasoning, decision making, human and artificial intelligence, and cognitive development. 3 hours lecture. (007903)
An examination of quantitative or qualitative research methods via the design and implementation of original research or evaluation studies. These activities develop skills in research design, sampling techniques, instrumentation, data collection, analyses, and interpretation of results. Presentation or manuscript submission is encouraged. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (020072)
Introduction to the study, definition, and classification of deviant behavior, including experimental psychopathology, psychodiagnostic methods, and psychotherapeutic procedures. 3 hours lecture. (007939)
Introduction to the nature and development of personality, with emphasis on the normal adult, including theories of personality, techniques of assessment, and a survey of current research. 3 hours lecture. (007944)
Examination of the nature of prejudice and hate and their contribution to societal violence. How prejudice and hatred affect personal, family, and group behavior are considered in a context of understanding factors that contribute to their development. Strategies for reducing the prevalence of prejudice, hatred, and violence in our contemporary culture are evaluated. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (007908)

Geography

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A systematic survey of human economic activities. Analysis of resource exploitation and use, including agriculture, extractive activities, industry, commerce, and service functions. Recommended for business and liberal arts majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003871)
Geography in the news. Analysis of current world conflicts and problem areas, with an emphasis upon examination of social, economic, political, and environmental realities. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003872)
Geographic analysis of humanity's interaction with the environment. Examines natural and human systems, resources, population, energy, and pollution. Develops an appreciation of the beauty, balance, and complexity of natural systems and human success in attaining harmony with them. Enhances awareness and perception of each individual's role in and with the environment. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (003873)
This course is also offered as LAST 357 .
Study of the physical environment, human settlement, development, and modern problems of the nations of Latin America. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021143)

Religious Studies

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An introduction to major religions of the contemporary world (Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, and Chinese religions) with particular emphasis on their relationship to pressing global issues, including economics and poverty, environmental issues, war and peace, and human rights. Explores a number of religious traditions that are closely identified with specific ethnic groups in this country. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (008190)
This course explores how Christians, Buddhists, and Marxists have sought to answer questions about the nature and goals of human life and about the methods of individual and social transformation. Attention will be given to the diversity of ethical perspectives in the traditions on such topics as the human good, the ideal society, political and economic life, war and peace, the family, the meaning of freedom, and the nature of salvation. 3 hours discussion. (008165)
An examination of the representation of religious concerns and meaning in modern film. Utilizing resources developed in religious traditions and in the field of religious studies, the course examines themes central to the human condition such as selfhood, religious conviction, despair, redemption, and race and ethnicity. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (008149)
Prerequisites: RELS 100 or RELS 110 or faculty permission.
A study of the history, theories, and methods of religious studies as a scholarly and academic discipline, with emphasis on the biographical and historical contexts of significant contributors to the discipline and their classic works. Topics include secular vs. religious approaches to the study of religion and the contrast between religious insiders' and outsiders' perspectives; alternative theories of the origins and functions of religion; and debates over whether religion is a positive or a negative influence in the lives of inindividuals and social groups. 3 hours seminar. (008191)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; concurrent enrollment or prior completion of RELS 281 and RELS 480.
Readings and research on selected topics in religious studies. Content varies. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (008200)

English

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An introduction to linguistics. Topics include language acquisition, language structure, language variation, and languages of the world. This course is required for CLAD and BCLAD credentials as well as credential programs beginning in the fall of 2003 under SB 2042 standards. 3 hours lecture. (003450)
This course emphasizes both the grammatical content needed to teach non-native speakers and various integrated approaches to teaching grammar. 3 hours lecture. (003527)
An introduction to the descriptive grammar of English. Students learn to use basic syntactic terms to analyze spoken and written English, distinguishing between descriptive and prescriptive grammar. Required of English majors by the end of the junior year in preparation for upper-division course work in English. 3 hours lecture. (003452)
An examination of recent psycholinguistic theory and research in the field of reading as a language process, with practical experience in reading instruction. 3 hours seminar. (003535)

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Catalog Cycle:14