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The Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Food Sciences

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Degree MAPs page in the University Catalog or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

  • MADT 103 is an approved GE Writing Intensive substitution.
  • JOUR 260 is an approved GE Writing Intensive substitution.
  • NFSC 429 is an approved GE Capstone substitution.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Literacy Requirement:

See Mathematics and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog. Writing proficiency in the major is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of a course in your major which has been designated as the Writing Proficiency (WP) course for the semester in which you take the course. Students who earn below a C- are required to repeat the course and earn a C- or higher to receive WP credit. See the Class Schedule for the designated WP courses for each semester. You must complete the GE Written Communication (A2) requirement before you may register for a WP course.

Course Requirements for the Major: 69-75 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree. Additional required courses, depending upon the selected option are outlined following the major core program requirements.

Note: A maximum of 15 units of externship courses may be applied to a bachelor's degree at CSU, Chico.

Major Core: 40 units

13 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Basic functioning of the organ systems of the human body, including the brain and nervous system; vision and hearing; heart and circulation; blood and immunity; respiration, digestion and metabolism; muscles; excretory, endocrine, and reproductive systems. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (001114)
Prerequisites: BIOL 103, BIOL 104, BIOL 151, or SCED 102; CHEM 107, CHEM 108, or CHEM 111.
Introduction to structure/function, metabolism, genetics, ecological interactions and pathogenic mechanisms of microorganisms. In addition, the roles of microorganisms in sanitation and in the food and biotechnology industries will be discussed. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001132)
Prerequisites: Completion of ELM requirement, Intermediate Algebra.
A survey of the principles of chemistry, primarily for students in agriculture, industry and technology, and pre-nursing. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001826)
Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or CHEM 111 or equivalent.
A survey of organic chemistry emphasizing the structure, properties, and reactions of all major functional groups of organic molecules. Not applicable towards a degree in chemistry or biochemistry. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001828)
Prerequisites: Completion of ELM requirement.
Summary of numerical data, elementary probability, distributions, and introduction to statistical inference. 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (005501)
An elementary study of the chemical, physical and sensory properties of foods. An emphasis on food science principles as they relate to food preparation, ingredient function and interaction, purchasing, storage, nutrient preservation, safety and sanitation. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (004271)
Knowledge of national (FDA's Food Code and statewide (California Retail Food Code) health and sanitation principles for retail food facilities. A student may receive a ServSafe® Certification from the National Restaurant Association certification if he or she receives a minimum of 75% on the respective examinations. Good Agricultural Practices are reviewed alongside various food safety topics. 2 hours lecture. (020596)
Introduction to professional associations, legislation, and career opportunities in the Nutrition and Food Sciences major and an introduction to campus resources. 1 hour lecture. Credit/no credit grading. (020288)
Study of management tools and practices ranging from conceptual to applied as they relate to all aspects of the field of nutrition and food services. 3 hours discussion. (004294)
Prerequisites: BIOL 211, CHEM 108, NFSC 120.
Application of principles and methods of physical and sensory analysis of food; effects of functional ingredients, processing, and biotechnology on the food supply. Group research projects are conducted, presented, and evaluated. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (004293)
Prerequisites: BIOL 104, CHEM 108.
Physiological and chemical roles of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, minerals, vitamins, and water in the functioning of the human body. Factors affecting the digestion of foods, use of nutrients, and the body's need for nutrients. 3 hours discussion. (004296)
Prerequisites: BIOL 104; NFSC 100 or NFSC 340.
A survey of nutritional needs from conception to death, including the relationship of nutrients to health and well-being and factors which affect food selection of different population groups. 3 hours discussion. (004298)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Written Communication (A2) requirement, NFSC 120. Recommended: ANTH 113, GEOG 102.
Study of world food patterns, including food customs of peoples of different ethnic backgrounds. Emphasis upon nutritional significance. Survey of social, economic, religious, and aesthetic aspects of food customs. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved US Diversity course. (004330)

Major Option Course Requirements: 29-35 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required dependent upon the option chosen. Students must select one of the following options for completion of the major course requirements.  Use the links below to jump to your chosen option.



The Option in Food and Nutrition Communication: 29-30 units

Notice: Students must complete a GE Area A1 course before enrolling in the following NFSC required courses.

8 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course introduces health education theory, curricula, resources, and marketing techniques for use in school and community settings. Students plan, develop, implement, and evaluate effective health education and promotion programs. Students practice professional health education techniques while working with a local organization to implement a community health education. 3 hours lecture. Formerly HCSV 369. (001613)
Prerequisites: One lower-division course in biological sciences.
Analyzes and evaluates current practices and theories regarding nutrition and its relationship to athletics, weight control, and physical exercise. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (004288)
Prerequisite: NFSC 340.
This course is designed to develop skills in the use of clinical nutrition in the prevention and treatment of diet-related health problems, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and kidney disease. 3 hours lecture. (020608)
Prerequisites: NFSC 340.
Scientific overview of popular dietary supplements and food phytochemicals and their relation to human health and disease. Current government regulations are also considered. 3 hours lecture. (020289)
Prerequisites: NFSC 360 (may be taken concurrently).
Communication skills for nutrition counseling and nutrition education; strategies and techniques for nutrition education; including the development, implementation and evaluation of nutrition education interventions; client-centered nutrition counseling techniques to promote behavior change. 3 hours seminar. (004335)
Prerequisites: Senior standing.
Overview of career opportunities and application procedures for post-baccalaureate programs in the discipline. 1 hour lecture. (004336)
Prerequisites: NFSC 360, NFSC 365 (may be taken concurrently).
Acquaints the student with nutrition programs that relate the science of nutrition to the improvement, maintenance, and promotion of the health status of individuals and groups. Community organization and assessment, program planning, funding and evaluation, and current status of foreign and domestic food insecurity and hunger will be addressed. 2 hours lecture. (004333)
This course is an externship offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. The externship provides students with preprofessional experience and is designed as a transition to professional practice wherein the student applies learned theory to actual practice. Students may be required to purchase professional liability insurance. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (004353)

Note: Students are required to take 2 units of externship in one of the areas of study. Please see the designated advisor of one of the core areas described below for recommendations on externship placements.

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An introduction to the study of one-to-one relationships, focusing on the experience, behavior, and rules governing such interpersonal contexts as friendships, families, and employer-employee relations. Factors influencing communication are studied, such as language, perception, non-verbal, power, status, and roles. Problems of communication are identified and studied. Confidence in relating interpersonally is handled. 3 hours discussion. (002219)
Focus is on the problems of communication between cultural groupings inside and outside of the U.S. Various historical and political contexts in which intercultural communication occurs are examined. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021193)

Area of Study: 6-7 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required depending upon the area of study chosen. Students must select one of the following areas of study for completion of the major course requirements.

Lifecycle Nutrition Area of Study: 6 units

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: NFSC 360 or faculty permission.
Examines the relationship of food and nutrition with social, cultural and behavioral factors in child and adolescent development. Topics include nutrition and learning, nutrition education, eating disorders, sports nutrition, public policy, food safety and child nutrition programs. 3 hours lecture. (020611)
Prerequisite: NFSC 360 or faculty permission.
Designed to provide an overview of the physiological, socioeconomic, psychological, and environmental factors affecting the nutritional status and requirements of older adults. Policies and programs related to health care and nutrition services for older Americans are also addressed. 3 hours lecture. (020612)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A study of the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of children from conception through adolescence. The course examines genetic, biological, and environmental influences including cross-cultural issues. Scheduled observations are included. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (001442)
Prerequisites: CHLD 252 or PSYC 355.
This class examines the physical, cognitive, emotional, and psychosocial aspects of growth during the school-aged years (ages 5 through 12), as well as contextual influences (e.g., family, school, peer group) on children's development. Particular attention is paid to the implications of developmental patterns for those who work with school-aged children. 3 hours lecture. (001449)
Exploration of changing health status and needs in later life. Discussion of body system changes, bio-psycho-social influences on elders' health, health enhancement strategies, common health problems, treatment, and prevention. Also addresses drug use and abuse, sexuality, chronic illness, use of health delivery systems, including long-term care. 3 hours lecture. (001569)
Examines major social policies, legislation, programs, models of service delivery, and funding related to the needs and concerns of older adults living in the US. Barriers to service availability and delivery to older populations-at-risk, and types of advocacy efforts to promote policy change are addressed. 3 hours lecture. (001570)

Media and Writing Area of Study: 6 units

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: English Placement Test score of 147 or higher.
An intensive writing course designed to introduce students to professional expository writing by using media content as models and a platform. Emphasis is on clarity, conciseness, and consistency in style, along with form, content, context, and effectiveness of communication. Writing for various audiences will feature the Internet, academic writing, persuasion, description and other rhetorical models. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity.This is an approved Writing Intensive course. This is an approved General Education course. (021092)
The mass media are changing more rapidly now than at any time in the past century, and this course gives a context to those changes and provides an overview of what citizens need to know for understanding the role of the mass media in their public lives. Students explore the structure of media organizations; the professional and ethical values of journalists; the needs, desires, and influences of culture on media consumers; and the impact of evolving media technologies on public discourse. This includes critical analysis of the relationship of journalism and society and their effect on democracy, as well as the psychological, political, economic, and cultural values of citizens. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (020555)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130I or JOUR 130I.
Techniques of information gathering and writing for various audiences in the mass media. Required course for the Options in News-Editorial and Public Relations. Students must earn a grade of C or higher to advance to subsequent writing courses in the Department of Journalism. Students who do not receive at least a C may repeat the course. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (004838)
Prerequisites: JOUR 260.
Techniques of writing nonfiction articles and features for publication; where to find material, markets. Student writings may appear in campus publications such as Orion. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (001667)
Prerequisites: ENGL 130I.
An introduction to the styles and formats used in writing for radio, television, multimedia, and the Web. Writing includes commercials /public service announcements, news, and informational programming. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. Formerly CDES 103. (001638)
This course is an introduction to the fundamental vocabulary and techniques of digital photography. Emphasis is placed on developing visual competence in the creation and consumption of lens-based imagery. Course content includes the basics of camera and digital production techniques for color and black and white photographs that are produced as exhibition-quality prints and on-screen imagery. Includes a broad-based survey of photo history, contemporary theory, and current issues related to the practice of photography. Open to non-majors. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. Formerly CDES 206. (001654)
An exploration of the design and impacts of new technologies related to communication through social media. 3 hours lecture. Formerly CDES 219. (001772)
An introduction to the application of media and learning theories that emphasize efforts and practices on designing, developing, delivering, and assessing the effects of digital media on the development of consumers' knowledge, perceptions, beliefs, and behaviors. The understanding and awareness of the impact of media on both intentional and incidental learning will be explored. 3 hours discussion. Formerly CDES 271. (001684)

Sports Nutrition Area of Study: 6-7 units

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: BIOL 104 with a grade of C- or higher or faculty permission for non-majors, basic computer literacy skills.
This course is an in-depth study of the physiology of exercise. Emphasis will be placed on energy metabolism during exercise and its relationship to the circulatory, pulmonary, and neuro-endocrine systems. Practical application will be stressed through discussions of clinical exercise physiology, exercise prescription, environmental exercise physiology, exercise and disease, special populations, biological adaptation, and the biology of peak performance. Concepts will be reinforced through laboratory exercises. 3 hours clinical, 2 hours activity. (006968)
Prerequisite: Bachelor's Degree in any discipline or KINE 323 or faculty permission.
Exercise Pathophysiology, formerly known as Medical Topics in Exercise Physiology, focuses on how exercise ameliorates various chronic disorders. The course addresses obesity, metabolic, cardiovascular, muscular, skeletal, and auto-immune disorders. 3 hours seminar. (007027)
Prerequisites: NFSC 303 or NFSC 340; CHEM 108.
Integration of nutrition, physiology, and biochemistry in the examination of the relationship among nutrition, fitness, and exercise performance. Emphasis is on the application of current research finding in regards to nutrition and athletic performance. 3 hours lecture. (015977)

The Option in Nutrition Management: 30 units

9 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Introductory study of the information system that measures, records, and communicates the economic activity of an entity, in monetary terms, to stakeholders outside of the organization. The study of assets, liabilities, owners' equity, revenues, expenses, gains, and losses as they relate to the preparation of financial statements communicating an entity's financial position, results of operations, and cash flows. 3 hours lecture. (000077)
Nature and functions of marketing systems and marketing in the individual firm. Study of the marketing mix, marketing institutions, and the environments in which marketing decisions are made. 3 hours lecture. (005872)
Prerequisite: NFSC 340.
This course is designed to develop skills in the use of clinical nutrition in the prevention and treatment of diet-related health problems, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and kidney disease. 3 hours lecture. (020608)
Prerequisites: NFSC 120; NFSC 122; NFSC 230 or MGMT 303.
Principles of purchasing for commercial and institution foodservice. A study of the types of food, their distribution, and laws affecting sales and quality; purchase procedures for other supplies and equipment. Preparation of purchase specifications, factors affecting cost control, budgeting, and theories of internal control. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (004326)
Prerequisites: NFSC 430.
Application of meal production, recipe adaptation and costing, employee and production schedules, environmental health control, inservice training, and logic models. Survey of various foodservice operations. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (004332)
Prerequisites: Senior standing.
Overview of career opportunities and application procedures for post-baccalaureate programs in the discipline. 1 hour lecture. (004336)
This course is an externship offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. The externship provides students with preprofessional experience and is designed as a transition to professional practice wherein the student applies learned theory to actual practice. Students may be required to purchase professional liability insurance. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (004353)
Prerequisite: NFSC 431 or faculty permission.
Study and application of program and organizational management within the fields of food and nutrition, such as community nutrition and health programs, clinical nutrition administration, and school and hospital foodservice administration. 3 hours lecture. (021446)
Prerequisites: RHPM 200, RHPM 220, RHPM 300 (for RECR majors only); ACCT 201, NFSC 230 (for NFSC majors only); or faculty permission.
Management approaches to budget and finance in recreation and park agencies and businesses; budget preparations, forecasting, accounting techniques, and capital acquisition. Review of revenue options, capital funding, and revenue sources included. 3 hours discussion. Formerly RECR 420. (008829)

Note: Students are required to take at least 2 units of externship.

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: NFSC 360 or faculty permission.
Examines the relationship of food and nutrition with social, cultural and behavioral factors in child and adolescent development. Topics include nutrition and learning, nutrition education, eating disorders, sports nutrition, public policy, food safety and child nutrition programs. 3 hours lecture. (020611)
Prerequisite: NFSC 360 or faculty permission.
Designed to provide an overview of the physiological, socioeconomic, psychological, and environmental factors affecting the nutritional status and requirements of older adults. Policies and programs related to health care and nutrition services for older Americans are also addressed. 3 hours lecture. (020612)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Written Communication (A2) requirement.
Emphasis is on solving business problems through the strategic design of verbal, print, and electronic messages. Models for effective business documents, presentations, meetings, and interpersonal as well as electronic project interaction are applied to business communication problems. Related technology use, etiquette, cultural differences, and ethical considerations are highlighted. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (005687)
Prerequisites: At least junior standing or faculty permission.
Intensive examination of unions in an organizational setting. Includes organizational and concerted activities, collective bargaining and employee/employer rights and responsibilities. Includes applied collective bargaining project. 3 hours discussion. (001343)
This course is also offered as POLS 319 .
Current status and future opportunities in health care for prisoners. Major health issues to be explored are addiction, sexuality, violence reduction, mental health, and health promotion. Special attention is given to incarcerated women, juveniles, elders, and the mentally ill. Issues in worksite health promotion for prison employees is also addressed. 3 hours lecture. (020831)
Provides an overview of the U.S. healthcare delivery system from historical, organizational, financial, and administrative perspectives. Analyzes current health issues, such as cost, access, and quality of care. 3 hours seminar. Formerly HCSV 431. (001583)
Exploration of changing health status and needs in later life. Discussion of body system changes, bio-psycho-social influences on elders' health, health enhancement strategies, common health problems, treatment, and prevention. Also addresses drug use and abuse, sexuality, chronic illness, use of health delivery systems, including long-term care. 3 hours lecture. (001569)
This course surveys human resource management practices needed for effective performance by every manager and employee. The focus of the course is on processes used to effectively recruit, select, develop, evaluate, reward, and ensure the safety of employees in order to attract and retain the best possible workforce in any organization. This course provides students with an understanding of workforce diversity, investigates ethical issues, and explores the international context of HRM. 3 hours lecture. (005690)
Prerequisites: MKTG 305.
Study of the decision processes of individuals and groups toward consumer products and the implications to marketers. Emphasis on both individual, group, and external determinants of consumer attitudes and behavior. 3 hours discussion. (005873)
Prerequisites: NFSC 100 or NFSC 340; selected screening courses by content area, all with grades which place student in top five percent; interview; faculty permission.
An independent study involving substantial research for a thesis or project culminating in a public presentation. Students will enroll in NFSC 499H twice. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (004357)
Examines major social policies, legislation, programs, models of service delivery, and funding related to the needs and concerns of older adults living in the US. Barriers to service availability and delivery to older populations-at-risk, and types of advocacy efforts to promote policy change are addressed. 3 hours lecture. (001570)

The Option in General Dietetics: 35 units

Registered Dietitians Nutritionists (RDNs) are food and nutrition expert who have met the following criteria to earn the RDN credential:

1. Completed a minimum of a bachelor's degree at a U.S. regionally accredited university or college and course work approved by the Commission on Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND). Courses in the Option in General Dietetics meet the requirements of Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for an accredited Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD).

2. Completed a post-baccalaureate ACEND accredited supervised practice program.

3. Pass a national registration exam.

The Commission on Dietetics Registration (CDR) has mandated that beginning January 1, 2024, a minimum of a graduate degree will be required to sit for the RDN credential exam.

Notice to Prospective Applicants for Option in General Dietetics

A supplemental Dietetics application must be submitted by March 1. A Dietetics application is available from the Nutrition and Food Sciences department office. In addition to the application, students must provide transcripts of all previous college or university level work, a resume, two letters of recommendation, and a one-page written personal statement about your career goals. Applications are reviewed by a committee which ranks all applications for placement. Students not selected for the option are encouraged to meet with a NFSC faculty advisor. Students not selected may reapply once.

Prerequisites for Admission to the Option in General Dietetics

1. The cumulative grade point average for all college-level work must be a minimum of 2.75.

2. The following prerequisites must be completed with a grade of C or higher: MATH 105, BIOL 104, BIOl 211, CHEM 107, CHEM 108, NFSC 340. It is highly recommended that CHEM 350 be in progress or completed the semester students apply for admission to the option.

13 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: CHEM 108.
A survey of biochemistry, principally for agriculture, child development, and nursing students. Normally not open to chemistry or biological sciences majors. 3 hours discussion. (001849)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of CHEM 350.
Fundamental laboratory studies and examination of the major classes of biological compounds. Principally for agriculture, child development, and nursing students. Normally not open to chemistry or biological sciences majors. 3 hours laboratory. (001850)
Prerequisites: NFSC 340.
Scientific overview of popular dietary supplements and food phytochemicals and their relation to human health and disease. Current government regulations are also considered. 3 hours lecture. (020289)
Prerequisites: NFSC 360 (may be taken concurrently).
Communication skills for nutrition counseling and nutrition education; strategies and techniques for nutrition education; including the development, implementation and evaluation of nutrition education interventions; client-centered nutrition counseling techniques to promote behavior change. 3 hours seminar. (004335)
Prerequisites: NFSC 120; NFSC 122; NFSC 230 or MGMT 303.
Principles of purchasing for commercial and institution foodservice. A study of the types of food, their distribution, and laws affecting sales and quality; purchase procedures for other supplies and equipment. Preparation of purchase specifications, factors affecting cost control, budgeting, and theories of internal control. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (004326)
Prerequisites: NFSC 430.
Application of meal production, recipe adaptation and costing, employee and production schedules, environmental health control, inservice training, and logic models. Survey of various foodservice operations. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (004332)
Prerequisites: CHEM 350 or CHEM 451 with a grade of C or higher, NFSC 340.
Theories integrated from physiology, biochemistry, and nutrition with recent developments in the discipline. Emphasis on practical significance of current research and theory. 4 hours seminar. (004331)
Prerequisites: Senior standing, permission of Didactic Program Director.
Overview of career opportunities in dietetics and application procedures for dietetic internishops and other post-baccalaureate programs in the discipline. 1 hour lecture. (020609)
Prerequisites: NFSC 360, NFSC 365 (may be taken concurrently).
Acquaints the student with nutrition programs that relate the science of nutrition to the improvement, maintenance, and promotion of the health status of individuals and groups. Community organization and assessment, program planning, funding and evaluation, and current status of foreign and domestic food insecurity and hunger will be addressed. 2 hours lecture. (004333)
Prerequisites: NFSC 365, NFSC 440.
Corequisite: NFSC 465.
Provides fieldwork experience in a community-based nutrition program. Development, implementation and evaluation of a nutrition education plan is also addressed. 3 hours laboratory. (020610)
Prerequisites: NFSC 440 (may be taken concurrently).
Investigation of the physiological and biochemical changes imposed on the body by certain disorders as well as by dietary modifications, and analysis of nutritive value of diets prescribed for treatment of disease as part of the nutrition care process. Adaptation of dietary patterns of individuals to special needs. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (015979)
Prerequisite: NFSC 470.
A continuation of the investigation of the physiological and biochemical changes imposed on the body by certain disorders as well as by dietary modifications, and analysis of nutritive value of diets prescribed for treatment of disease as part of the nutrition care process. Adaptation of dietary patterns of individuals to special needs. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (020613)
Introduction to concepts and problems in psychology. Topics include perception, learning, development, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior, and biological and social bases of behavior. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (007881)

Clinical Nutrition

Students preparing for advanced degrees or careers in nutrition research should complete the required units of the Option in General Dietetics and also complete the following courses, which include a Chemistry minor.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.
The inheritance, expression, and evolution of the genetic material in humans. Topics include genetic engineering, gene therapy, prenatal diagnosis, cancer, the human genome project, genetic influences on human behavior, such as homosexuality and mental illness, and the social and ethical consequences of the new technologies. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (001140)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: BIOL 153 or permission of instructor.
A detailed study of the principles of classical, molecular, and population/evolutionary genetics. Activities will include computer simulations of segregation, linkage, and population genetics, internet-based database searches for genetic diseases and cloned genes, and searches of the current genetic literature. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour discussion. (001173)
Prerequisites: BIOL 152, BIOL 153; CHEM 108 or CHEM 270.
General features of vertebrate physiology. Function of muscular, nervous, respiratory, circulatory, excretory, and endocrine systems. 2 hours discussion, 6 hours laboratory. (001180)
Prerequisites: CHEM 112.
A study of the fundamental principles of organic chemistry: the chemistry of carbon compounds. Lecture topics include structure, bonding, nomenclature, physical properties of organic compounds, stereochemistry, basic spectroscopy, and basic chemical reactions and their mechanisms. Laboratory topics include the discussion and application of organic laboratory techniques, reactions, and an introduction to organic synthesis. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001840)
Prerequisites: CHEM 112 with a grade of C- or higher.
Precision and accuracy in measurements, interpretation of data by statistical analysis, and development of good quantitative techniques. Analysis by gravimetry, titrimetry, potentiometry, chromatography, and spectrometry. 2 hours discussion, 6 hours laboratory. (001847)
Prerequisites: CHEM 270 with a grade of C- or higher.
A continuation of CHEM 270. Topics include properties and reactions of ethers, conjugated systems, aromatic compounds, aldehydes and ketones, amines, carboxylic acids and derivatives, and biologically relevant molecules. 3 hours discussion. (001852)
Prerequisites: CHEM 370 may be taken as a prerequisite or concurrently with CHEM 370L.
Laboratory continuation of CHEM 270. Laboratory experiments in organic chemistry focused on topics discussed in CHEM 370. Not applicable towards a degree in chemistry or biochemistry. 3 hours laboratory. (001856)
Prerequisites: CHEM 370 with a grade of C- or higher.
A general study of the chemistry of biomolecules. Conformation and function of enzymes and other proteins; metabolism, energy generation, and storage; brief discussion of important physiological processes. 3 hours discussion. (001900)
Prerequisite: CHEM 451 (may be taken concurrently). Recommended: CHEM 370L or CHEM 370M.
Separation, identification, and/or analysis of biological materials by modern procedures, such as spectrophotometry, chromatography (gas, TLC, column, ion exchange), electrophoresis, enzymology, fluorimetry, and high-speed centrifugation. Fulfills laboratory requirement for certain biological science majors. Does not fulfill requirement for biochemistry major. 3 hours laboratory. (021067)

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Suggested elective:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is an externship offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. The externship provides students with preprofessional experience and is designed as a transition to professional practice wherein the student applies learned theory to actual practice. Students may be required to purchase professional liability insurance. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (004353)

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  1. You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  2. You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  3. Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  4. Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  5. Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  6. Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

Catalog Cycle:17