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The Master of Social Work

Course Requirements for the Master's Degree: 36-61 units

Continuous enrollment is required. A maximum of 9 units of transfer credit may be applied toward the degree.  At the discretion of the School of Social Work, a maximum of 30 percent of the units counted toward the degree requirements may be special session credit earned in non-matriculated status combined with all transfer coursework. This applies to special session credit earned through Open University, or in courses offered for academic credit through the Center for Regional and Continuing Education.

Thirty-six units are required for students who have a baccalaureate from social work programs accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) and who meet the criteria listed below for admission to the One-Year Program. Sixty-one units are required for students who meet the criteria listed below for admission to the Two-Year program or Three-Year program.

Graduate Time Limit

All requirements for the degree are to be completed within five years of the end of the semester of enrollment in the oldest course applied toward the degree. See "Graduate Education" in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements.

Field Education Requirement

The Master of Social Work requires a total of 480 hours of practicum during the foundation year, and 720 hours of practicum during the concentration year. Employment-based practica are considered on an individual basis when agencies are able to provide students with a position that is educationally focused and involves tasks other than normal work duties.

Advanced Generalist Concentration with Focus in Mental Health Services, Families, Children, and Youth Services, or Gerontology

The concentration year presents students with a broad-based set of knowledge, skills, and values necessary for multiple levels of advanced social work practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. The major emphases for the concentration year are direct services to individuals, families, and groups; community and organizational practice; policy analysis and practice; and research as practice. Students choose either Mental Health Services, Families, Children, and Youth Services, or Gerontology as their focus area for the concentration year. The thesis, project, and electives augment students' expertise in the focus areas.

A. Mental Health Services

The focus in Mental Health Services is designed to prepare students for a career of service to persons with mental health challenges. Graduates may be employed in community mental health centers, psychiatric and acute care hospitals, regional centers, substance abuse programs, and a variety of other social service agencies.

B. Families, Children, and Youth Services

The focus in Families, Children and Youth Services is designed to prepare students for a career of service to at-risk families and children. Graduates may be employed in a variety of settings including family resource agencies, public child welfare agencies, probation departments, adoption agencies, child guidance centers, schools, and a variety of other social service agencies.

C. Gerontology

The focus of Gerontology is to prepare the student for a career of service to older adults and their families. Students in this focus area have a hands-on and diverse experience working with older adults across the broad spectrum of their lives. Graduates may be employed in settings that focus on: wellness/prevention; social, community, and spiritual engagement; housing; mental health services; health care; legal systems; and/or planning and advocacy.

Admission Application Procedures

The School of Social Work accepts applications from October 1st to January 5th each year. Students are admitted to the MSW Program each fall semester for the Two-Year program, and in the summer for entering the One-Year program. A Three-Year program is offered only on specified years. See the Social Work Website or call the department office for additional information. In addition to the Office of Graduate Studies procedures (please see the University Catalog, Graduate Education: Application Procedures), the School of Social Work has its own application. The Office of Graduate Studies' application is available online at http://www.CSUMentor.edu; the Social Work application is entirely online at http://www.csuchico.edu/swrk.

Prerequisites for Admission to Conditionally Classified Status:

Conditionally classified status indicates the student has been admitted to the MSW program, but has not been formally approved for MSW study. The student is progressing toward meeting the requirements outlined by the University and the School of Social Work to qualify for Classified Status by the end of the first semester of the MSW program. Conditionally Classified admission may be granted to applicants who have a cumulative GPA of less than 3.0 (on a 4.0 point scale) in their undergraduate academic coursework. If all requirements are met after the first semester, then the graduate status will be changed to "classified".

MSW students are required to maintain an average 3.0 GPA at all times during their program. Students admitted Conditionally Classified because of a cumulative GPA of less than 3.0 and have obtained a baccalaureate-level degree from any state or territory within the United States or the international equivalent of a baccalaureate-level degree as determined by the Office of Graduate Studies, must submit a written request with appropriate documentation based on having met at least one of the following criteria:

1. completed 12 units of academic postbaccalaureate graduate level coursework with a GPA of 3.0 or higher from an accredited college or university;

2. provided outstanding paid or volunteer experience in human service agencies;

3. performed successful grant writing for human service organizations;

4. achieved Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores that indicate an ability to complete graduate level work;

5. shown significant potential for advanced social work practices.

In this circumstance, students must also have obtained approval by the School of Social Work MSW Admissions Committee and the Office of Graduate Studies.

Prerequisites for Admission to Classified Status:

In addition to meeting the requirements stated above, students must have:

1. a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better (on a 4.0 scale) in their academic coursework, and

2. approval by the School of Social Work MSW Admissions Committee and the Office of Graduate Studies.

Advancement to Candidacy:

Students achieve Candidacy status when they have clearly demonstrated the ability and aptitude for attaining their MSW degree. The student must have:

1. classified graduate standing;

2. completed at least 15 units of the concentration year of the MSW program;

3. passed the Graduate Requirement in Writing Proficiency;

4. finished all "incomplete" grades in courses included in the MSW program;

5. filed a plan with the School of Social Work regarding completion of a culminating activity (thesis, project, or comprehensive examination); and

6. approval by the MSW Program Director of the School of Social Work.

Requirements for the Master of Social Work:

For the MSW to be conferred, students must meet the following criteria:

1. completion of all requirements as established by the School of Social Work MSW Program Committee and the Office of Graduate Studies;

2. completion of a culminating activity as specified in "Master's Degree Requirements" in the University Catalog and as approved by the MSW Program Committee. The MSW program requires students to satisfactorily complete (1) a thesis, (2) a project, or (3) a comprehensive examination (along with two electives) as a condition of graduation. Students work with their faculty advisor or the Comprehensive Examination Committee Chair in deciding which option will best fulfill their academic and professional goals. The student is required to choose the type of culmination activity the spring semester of the Foundation year.

3. approval by the School's MSW Program Director and the Graduate Coordinators on behalf of the faculty of the University.

4. minimum grade requirement in all courses of C (C- is not acceptable). If a student earns less than a C grade in a MSW course, s/he will be required to repeat the course (see the MSW Handbook and Guide to Graduate Studies regarding policy for repeating graduate courses).

Requirements for the Two-Year and Three-Year MSW Programs

Students who do not possess a baccalaureate in social work must complete 31 units of 600-level social work professional foundation courses prior to the 30-32, depending on program plan, units of 600-level social work concentration year courses. The only exception to the required 600-level courses in the Two and Three-Year MSW program is that a student may enroll in one 500-level elective in lieu of one 600-level elective following approval by the MSW Program Director. Twelve hundred hours of field education practicum are required. Requirements for the Three-Year program are the same as for the Two-Year program, but the courses are offered in a different sequence. The social work professional foundation courses for the Two-Year program must be taken in the following sequence:

Foundation Courses (First Year)

Fall Semester

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and acceptance to the MSW program or instructor permission.
Corequisites: SWRK 605, SWRK 608, SWRK 617, SWRK 631.
This course provides understanding of human behavior and social environment from an eco-systemic and value-based perspective as applicable in social work practice. Content includes theories and knowledge of human, bio-psycho-social development, and the range of social systems (families, groups, organizations, institutions, and communities) in which individuals live. This course looks at the larger view of the interaction of human behavior and the social environment across the life span from the human ancestor and family genetic inheritance to birth, childhood, youth, adult life, old age, and death. 3 hours lecture. (009446)
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and acceptance to the MSW program or instructor permission.
Corequisites: SWRK 601, SWRK 608, SWRK 617, SWRK 631.
This course examines economic, historical, political, intellectual, sociocultural, leadership, values, and ideologies and other factors which shape social welfare and economic policy, programs, and services. It addresses various frameworks for studying social welfare policy, programs, and services, and examines the roles of policy-makers, processes of social change, and the roles of social workers as facilitators of positive social change. Special emphasis is placed on effects of social and economic policy decisions on impoverished and oppressed people. 3 hours lecture. (009448)
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and acceptance to the MSW program.
Corequisites: SWRK 601, SWRK 605, SWRK 617, SWRK 631.
This is an introductory course in generalist social work practice methods and skills of social work intervention with individuals. Attention is given to the historic development of social work practice, the nature and application of social work values and ethical principles, the theoretical framework of helping methods and the helping process of assessment, planning, intervention, termination, and evaluation. Emphasis is on a generalist approach to helping within an ecosystem approach for understanding the person-in-situation. A minimum of one hour per week will be devoted to skills development laboratory. 3 hours clinical. (009450)
Prerequisites: Acceptance to the MSW program.
Corequisites: SWRK 601, SWRK 605, SWRK 608, SWRK 631.
This course provides an overview of social science and statistical research methods useful for social work practice. It provides the foundation knowledge and skills that enable students to be intelligent consumers of information, to conduct social research, and to critically evaluate social work practice. The application of social research methods to social work practice in various size systems is a primary emphasis. 4 hours lecture. (009449)
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and acceptance to the MSW program.
Corequisites: SWRK 601, SWRK 605, SWRK 608, SWRK 617.
Foundation field education is an educationally supervised agency experience designed for students to apply the knowledge, skills, and values learned in their previous liberal arts and concurrent social work courses. Students complete a minimum of 240 hours of supervised practice and participate in a bi-weekly integrating seminar throughout the semester. In consultation with students, the Field Education Director makes agency assignments. 9 hours supervision. Credit/no credit grading. (009455)

Spring Semester

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the first semester of the foundation year.
Corequisites: SWRK 610, SWRK 612, SWRK 632, SWRK 644.
This course is designed to provide a framework for systematic study of the components and issues involved in the practice of social work with groups and families. This course prepares the student to become familiar with the processes involved with group and family formation as well as ongoing processes of assessment, intervention, and evaluation. A minimum of one hour per week will be devoted to skills development laboratory. 3 hours clinical. (009451)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the first semester of the foundation year.
Corequisites: SWRK 609, SWRK 612, SWRK 632, SWRK 644.
This course is designed to help students understand organizations, institutions, and communities, and to provide the knowledge bases of social work generalist practice for interventions at this level. It provides an opportunity to explore selected macro models of practice, and learn about human service organizations that often serve as an immediate context for community practice. A minimum of one hour per week will be devoted to skills development laboratory. 3 hours clinical. (009452)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the first semester of the foundation year.
Corequisites: SWRK 609, SWRK 610, SWRK 632, SWRK 644.
This course is designed to assist graduate social work students in understanding and interacting in a culturally competent manner with the multitude of groups that are identified by race, culture, ethnicity, class, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, mental or physical disability, and regional and national origins that compose the diverse cultural mosaic of the U.S. The course will also cover issues relating to international social work practice and the increasingly interconnected global economy. 3 hours lecture. (009447)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the first semester of the foundation year.
Corequisites: SWRK 609, SWRK 610, SWRK 612, SWRK 644.
Foundation field education is an educationally supervised agency experience designed for students to apply the knowledge, skills, and values learned in their previous liberal arts and concurrent social work courses. Students complete a minimum of 240 hours of supervised practice and participate in a bi-weekly integrating seminar throughout the semester. In consultation with students, the Field Education Director makes agency assignments. 9 hours supervision. Credit/no credit grading. (009456)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of first semester of foundation year.
Corequisites: SWRK 609, SWRK 610, SWRK 612, SWRK 632.
This course examines theories and research regarding work groups, organizations, and communities as contexts for social work practice and preparation for practice with larger systems. Includes the role of community power structures in the governance of systems, the change process, and their effects on the provision of services, including interactions between these systems and diverse individuals and families. 3 hours lecture. (009462)

Concentration Year Courses (Second Year)

In the concentration year of the program, students have the option of focusing in Mental Health Services or in Families, Children, and Youth Services, Gerontology. These courses must be taken in the following sequence:

Fall Semester

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
Corequisites: SWRK 643, SWRK 648, SWRK 653.
This course prepares students for differential assessment and intervention with individuals and families with problems representative of the mental health focus area. Students develop knowledge and skills in the psychosocial approach to advanced ethnic-sensitive practice, crisis intervention, and other selected treatment approaches. Focus is on influences of culture, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, ability, spirituality, and generation in all phases of practice. 3 hours clinical. (009459)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
Corequisites: SWRK 643, SWRK 648, SWRK 653.
This course prepares students for differential assessment and intervention with individuals and families with problems representative of the families, children, and youth focus area. Students develop knowledge and skills in the psychosocial approach to advanced ethnic-sensitive practice, crisis intervention, and other selected treatment approaches. The focus is on influences of culture, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, ability, spirituality, and generation in all phases of practice. 3 hours clinical. (009460)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
Corequisites: SWRK 641 or SWRK 642; SWRK 648, SWRK 653.
This course provides content on assessment of families and individuals experiencing problems-in-living, including biopsychosocial considerations. Includes assessment methods and diagnostic techniques, including mental status, person-in-environment (PIE), psychosocial, risk, and safety assessments, and use of current DSM. The legal, social, cultural, and ethnic factors impacting assessment and intervention are explored. 3 hours clinical. (009461)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
Corequisites: SWRK 641 or SWRK 642; SWRK 643, SWRK 653.
Advanced practicum under the supervision and instruction of an MSW field instructor. This course provides students with opportunities to apply and expand knowledge, values, and skills gained from previous and concurrent course work with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. The Director of Field Education makes field assignments after consultation with the student and agency. Students complete 360 hours during the fall semester. 12 hours supervision. Credit/no credit grading. (009464)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
Corequisites: SWRK 641 or SWRK 642; SWRK 643, SWRK 648.
This course prepares students to design and conduct evaluative studies of social work interventions within the program context. Emphasis is on the development of evaluative research methods relevant to program evaluation. 3 hours lecture. (009469)

Thesis/project/elective (2-3 units).

Spring Semester

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
Corequisites: SWRK 655; SWRK 656 or SWRK 681; SWRK 658.
This course provides an introduction and overview of methodologies for supervision, consultation, management, administration, and planning within social services settings. Leadership, decision making, conflict resolution, fiscal management, fundraising, legal issues, program and staff development, and work with boards are covered. 3 hours lecture. (009468)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
Corequisites: SWRK 652, SWRK 658; SWRK 656 or SWRK 681.
This course prepares students to analyze social welfare and mental health policies and their impact on families, children, youth, adults, and older adults throughout the generations. Students examine the historic and current forces underlying the development of current policies and services. This course includes an analysis of alternative policy choices and their effect as a basis for intervention and service provisions at multi-system levels. 3 hours lecture. (009471)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of foundation year or instructor approval.
Corequisites: SWRK 652; SWRK 655; SWRK 658.
This advanced course continues students' understanding of organizations, institutions and communities, and the knowledge bases of social work generalist practice for interventions at this level. It provides an overview of personnel management, organizational functioning, planning, and community practice processes for advanced year students. Themes include selected macro models of practice, management, financing, and governance of human service organizations. 3 hours lecture. (020082)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the foundation year.
Corequisites: SWRK 652; SWRK 655; SWRK 658.
This course builds on SWRK 641 and SWRK 642 to provide advanced knowledge and skills for students wishing to pursue advanced clinical treatment of families and children. Emphasis is on contemporary research, theories, and models of intervention with families and children. 3 hours lecture. (009486)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of foundation year.
Corequisites: SWRK 652; SWRK 655; SWRK 656 or SWRK 681.
Continuation and culmination of supervised advanced practice experience with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Students complete 360 hours during the spring semester. 12 hours supervision. Credit/no credit grading. (009472)

Thesis/project/elective (2-3 units).

Requirements for the One-Year Program

Applicants who have completed all social work program requirements and obtained a social work baccalaureate degree accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) within five years of entry into the MSW program, and who meet the School of Social Work's criteria for acceptance in the One-Year program (entry into the concentration year), must complete 36-38 units of 600-level social work courses, including a minimum of 720 hours of field practicum. The One-Year program (concentration year) includes the 30-32 units listed above plus two courses (6 units) completed during the summer prior to entering the program. The only exception to the required 600-level courses in the One-Year MSW program is that a student may enroll in one 500-level elective in lieu of one 600-level elective following approval by the MSW Program Director.

Criteria for acceptance to the One-Year program are

1. qualifies for admission to classified status;

2. has a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher (on a 4.0 scale) and a B average or better in professional undergraduate social work courses;

3. has completed all courses required in the social work major, earning a baccalaureate degree in social work, within five years of entry.

Applicants Who Have Completed the Foundation Year at a CSWE Accredited MSW Program

Applicants who have completed the first year (foundation year) at a CSWE Accredited MSW Program within the last four years with a 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale), and are considered in good standing with the previous institution, must apply to the CSU, Chico Two-Year Program. Once accepted into the CSU, Chico Two-Year MSW Program, the student may request that his/her coursework at the previous MSW Program be evaluated to ensure it is reflective of the foundation year coursework in the CSU, Chico MSW Program.
If the courses for the previous CSWE Accredited MSW Program are comparable and meet the CSU, Chico MSW Program's Foundation Year competencies, the student may request admittance to the One-Year MSW Program. Thus, the students begin studies in the summer of the year accepted with the first courses enrolled being the SWRK 635 and SWRK 636 summer bridge courses. Upon completion of these courses with a 3.0 GPA (out of 4.0), the student would progress to the Concentration Year of the MSW Program in the fall semester, following the course sequencing. Note that all program requirements must be met within the five-year time limit.

Summer Session

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Graduate standing, admission to the MSW program, and acceptance in the One-Year Program.
This course is designed for students in the One-year Program (see admission requirements for BSW degree holders and holders of social work degrees not earned in the United States). The course helps students prepare for entry into the concentration year of the MSW program and aids in their adjustment to the rigors of graduate-level academic study. 3 hours lecture. (009457)
Prerequisites: Graduate standing, admission to the MSW program, and acceptance in the One-Year Program.
This course is designed to examine various scientific methods for social work research, with special attention to research design and statistical analysis (correlations, T-test, Chi Square, and analysis of variance). 3 hours lecture. (009458)

Electives

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is designed to provide graduate students with a four week international learning opportunity aimed at stimulating and expanding students' perspectives in cross-cultural and cross-national human services systems. It encourages students to experience, first hand, new international and cross-cultural learning in a variety of human services settings. The focus is on the application of knowledge, values, and skills, and the problem-solving process to human services policy, programs/services, and practices. The course content views the impact of gender, culture, ethnicity, economic status, sexual orientation, religion/spirituality, age, generation, and ability across the lifespan of human services issues. As advanced level social work practice, this course also integrates in-depth analysis of international cross-cultural policies and programs/practices affecting diverse peoples in light of the above variables in order to provide effective international cross-cultural services from an empowerment framework. 12 hours supervision. (021555)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the foundation year or instructor permission.
This course examines issues of trauma and working with people who have experienced trauma or loss or are facing death. Several theoretical approaches are examined, with emphasis on expanding knowledge of trauma concepts, intervention models, specific populations-at-risk, and developing treatment strategies and techniques that help people heal from trauma and deal with losses or imminent death. Focus is on planned interventions with individuals and families in stressful situations through the use of primarily cognitive or problem-solving approaches. 3 hours lecture. (009488)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the foundation year or instructor permission.
This course is designed to provide students with the specialized knowledge base necessary for policy analysis and advanced social work practice with older Americans and their families. Students learn a variety of practice concepts, skills, models, and theories from a strengths perspective, to facilitate their gerontology social work practice. Focus is on social work practice with older ethnic and minority group members, women, and people who belong to other special population groups. 3 hours lecture. (009479)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the foundation year or instructor permission.
This course examines the incidence and etiology of chemical dependence and its impact on individuals, families, and society. The course also addresses pharmacological properties and physiological, psychosocial, and cultural aspects of psychoactive substance use, assessment and classification of substance use disorders, and models of interventions and treatment. 3 hours lecture. (009482)
This course is intended to provide students with relevant information regarding wellness, and recovery in the field of mental health. Concepts, roles and applications vital to community mental health practice are covered. The purpose of this course is to meet the need for mental health practitioners who are knowledgeable and have essential skills in the area of recovery and wellness. 3 hours lecture. (020991)
Prerequisites: Instructor and MSW Director permission.
This course is a graduate-level independent study offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Students must register directly with a supervising faculty member and have approval of the MSW Director. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (009490)

Note: SWRK 697 may be taken only with permission of the MSW Director.

Other Approved Graduate Courses

Political Science

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course will review, analyze, and test strategies of public management. Emphasis will be on areas of decision-making, planning, development, budgeting, and collective bargaining. Purpose is to familiarize students with the various approaches to public sector problem-solving and decision-making, primarily by using the case study format. 3 hours seminar. (007698)
A survey of the processes of recruiting and managing personnel in the public service. The philosophy of public personnel administration, organization for personnel administration, history, and evolution of the career system, comparative modern structures, and general processes of personnel. Both traditional and behavioral literature. 3 hours seminar. (007699)
Survey of budgeting problems, issues, and applications of theories, research, and approaches toward use of cost-benefit analysis in the public sector. Activities are focused on surveying the literature and researching public programs using Program Planning and Budgeting Systems and cost-benefit analysis. 3 hours seminar. (007700)
3 hours seminar. (004473)

Psychology

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
The study of the mechanisms by which psychotropic drugs and natural plant substances alter human behavior and psychological state. The course emphasizes fundamentals of brain function (neurotransmitter-receptor interactions), principles of pharmacology, drugs of abuse and dependence, clinical pharmacology (the use of medications to treat behavioral, psychological, and psychiatric conditions such as eating disorders, hyperactivity, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease), and the use of drugs to alter cognitive states and improve attention, memory, and learning. 3 hours lecture. (007974)

Special Rules Governing Course Enrollment:

1. Not more than 15 units may be taken before admission to classified status.

2. No more than 9 units of transfer credit may be included in the program. (Correspondence courses and UC Extension coursework are not acceptable for transfer.) The MSW Program Director must approve acceptance of transfer credit.  At the discretion of the School of Social Work, a maximum of 30 percent of the units counted toward the degree requirements may be special session credit earned in non-matriculated status combined with all transfer coursework. This applies to special session credit earned through Open University, or in courses offered for academic credit through the Center for Regional and Continuing Education.

3. Students may enroll in a maximum of 6 units of Independent Study.

4. Not more than 2 units of SWRK 699T (Master's Thesis) or SWRK 699P (Master's Project) may be taken per semester, with no more than 4 units total.

5. After being accepted into the Two-Year or Three-Year MSW program, students with a social work baccalaureate degree obtained within the last five years may challenge selected courses from the professional foundation year of the MSW program if they believe they have mastered the objectives and content through previous courses. If successful, students will substitute elective courses in the program to meet the unit requirement for the degree. For detailed information, see "Proficiency Examination Policy" in The MSW Student Handbook.

6. A maximum of 12 units of Credit/No Credit graded coursework may be included in the One-Year MSW Program, and a maximum of 18 units of Credit/No Credit graded coursework may be included in the Two-Year or the Three-Year MSW Programs. All program courses must be taken for a letter grade with the exception of the foundation year and concentration year practicums that are credit/no credit (SWRK 631, SWRK 632, SWRK 648, and SWRK 658) and Master's Thesis or Project (SWRK 699T/SWRK 699P).

Graduate Requirement in Writing Proficiency:

Writing proficiency is a graduation requirement.

Students in the MSW program will demonstrate their writing competence through successful completion of either SWRK 641, Advanced Practice in Mental Health Services, or SWRK 642, Advanced Practice in Families, Children, and Youth Services during the concentration year of the program.

Graduate Grading Requirements:

All courses included in the MSW program (with the exception of practicum courses and thesis/project) must be taken for a letter grade. While grading standards are determined by individual programs and instructors, it is also the policy of the University that unsatisfactory grades may be given when work fails to reflect achievement of the highest standards, including high writing standards, expected of students pursuing the MSW degree.

Students must maintain a 3.0 grade point average in each of the following three categories: all coursework taken at any accredited institution subsequent to admission to the master's program; all coursework taken at CSU, Chico subsequent to admission to the program; and all courses on the approved master's degree program.

Graduate Advising Requirement:

Prior to the beginning of classes, students should contact the School of Social Work office with questions regarding the MSW program and their graduate education experience. After the beginning of classes, students should contact their assigned faculty advisor.

Human Subjects in Research

The use of human subjects in research at CSU, Chico is governed by Executive Memorandum 93-04 and by the policies of the University Human Subjects in Research Committee, which follow the Code of Federal Regulations for the protection of human subjects. If human subjects are part of the research, these regulations and policies must be complied with and proper procedures followed. For a copy of the guidelines and answers to specific questions, see the chair of the Campus Institutional Review Committee in the Office of Graduate Studies.

Standards of Professional Behavior and Conduct

Refer to the standards in the undergraduate section and the MSW Student Handbook on the Social Work Website at www.csuchico.edu/SWRK/.

Federal Title IV-E Child Welfare Training Program

The MSW program is a participant in the Federal Title IV-E Child Welfare Training Program. The program provides stipends to students who commit to a minimum of two years of postgraduate employment in public child welfare. Interested students should contact the MSW Director and the Title IV-E Coordinator in the School of Social Work.

John A. Hartford Partnership Program in Aging Education (HPPAE)

The HPPAE is an innovative opportunity for second-year (concentration) MSW students interested in gerontology. The program provides a rotation model that focuses on working with older adults across multiple settings and service needs. Students attend six specialized seminars/workshops during the year and may receive a stipend depending on funding source. Interested students should contact the MSW Program Director.

Mental Health Stipend Program

To address the growing need for MSWs in public mental health agencies, the Department of Mental Health (DMH) recently began funding through the Mental Health Services Act (California Prop 63). A portion of the Act provides for an annual stipend program to Schools of Social Work in California. On a year-to-year basis, one-year stipends are awarded to students in their last year of graduate social work programs. CSU, Chico School of Social Work received stipend grants for full-time concentration year students dedicated to working in county public mental health agencies. Please see rules on stipend funding in Roles and Responsibilities of MSW Students in the School of Social Work Student handbook. Detailed information regarding this program can be found on the School's Website.

Catalog Cycle:17