Skip to Side Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Accessibility Settings

The Bachelor of Arts in Humanities

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 39 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Major Academic Plans page or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

Courses in this program may complete more than one graduation requirement.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Upper-Division Writing Requirement:

Writing Across the Curriculum (Executive Memorandum 17-009) is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of four Writing (W) courses, two of which are designated by the major department. See Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog for more details on the four courses.  The first of the major designated Writing (W) courses is listed below.

  • Any upper-division Writing (W) course.

The second major-designated Writing course is the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GW) (Executive Order 665). Students must earn a C- or higher to receive GW credit. The GE Written Communication (A2) requirement must be completed before a student is permitted to register for a GW course.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Course Requirements for the Major: 40-42 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree.

Some courses appear under more than one area heading, but each course may be used to fulfill requirements in only one area.

Major Core Program: 16 units

6 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An overview of the artistic and intellectual heritage of the cultures of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Israel, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Medieval Europe, and Islam from their origins to 1500 C.E. Comparative analysis of music, art, architecture, and primary texts (theatre, philosophy and religion, literature, history, and political science). 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (015843)
An overview of Western Culture from the Renaissance to the present. Serves as a broad introduction to the major forms and types of artistic expression: sculpture, architecture, painting, philosophy, literature, drama, dance, film, and music, and includes comparative analysis of primary texts (theatre, philosophy and religion, literature, history, and political science). 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (015845)
A comprehensive introduction to Eastern art, literature, and philosophy, as revealed in the civilizations of India, China, and Japan. The course examines the rise of civilization in India, China, and Japan with special focus on Confucius, Lao Tzu, and the Buddha, and follows the development of artistic and intellectual culture down to modern times. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (020684)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Written Communication (A2) requirement.
A seminar devoted to interdisciplinary research in the humanities. Students will write and present a research project on an approved topic of their choice. Required for Humanities majors. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. (004824)
Corequisites: HUMN 400W for Humanities majors
In-depth studies of the techniques and skills used in doing research, interacting with primary and secondary sources, writing papers, and preparing presentations in the Humanities. Topics include sources of information using the library's electronic tools to gather information, assessing internet resources, citation formats, copyright laws, and ethical standard in research and writing. Advanced skills in the use of standard research tools, including library catalogs, online databases, and references materials as a way to discover resources applicable to developing a research topic, a thesis, an annotated bibliography, an abstract, and a well-organized seminar essay. 1 hour lecture. (021805)
This course is designed to examine the ways religion helps shape artistic expression and how various art forms-music, architecture, visual arts, storytelling, and film-serve as means of religious expression. We explore both traditional "sacred" art (e.g. temples, mosques, churches) as well as popular art (novels, movies, etc.) that have been shaped by religious themes. We explore the role of the arts in a number of different religious traditions. 3 hours seminar. (021622)

Language Requirement: 6-8 units

2 semesters of language, or pass an oral and written proficiency exam, or equivalent proficiency (on request).

2 courses selected from:

Romance and Germanic Languages:

Courses must be selected from the third and fourth semester levels:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: FREN 102 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in FREN 101 and FREN 102. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (003795)
Prerequisite: FREN 201 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in FREN 101, FREN 102, and FREN 201. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (003794)
Prerequisite: GERM 102 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in GERM 101 and GERM 102. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (004204)
Prerequisite: GERM 201 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in GERM 101, GERM 102, and GERM 201. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (004203)
Prerequisite: ITAL 102 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in ITAL 101 and ITAL 102. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (005093)
Prerequisite: ITAL 201 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in ITAL 101, ITAL 102, and ITAL 201. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (005092)
Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in SPAN 101 and SPAN 102. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (009121)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: Faculty permission.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills possessed by speakers of Spanish who have not studied the language formally. This course includes composition and reading. Particular focus on the Mexican-American/Latino experience. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (009123)
Prerequisite: SPAN 201 or equivalent.
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in SPAN 101, SPAN 102, and SPAN 201. This course includes composition and reading. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (009120)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: Faculty permission.
Further reviewing and expanding of language skills possessed by speakers of Spanish who have not studied the language formally. Builds on topics studied in SPAN 201N. This course includes composition and reading. Particular focus on the Mexican-American/Latino experience. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (009126)

Classical, non-Romance, and non-Germanic Languages:

Courses may be selected from the first and second semester levels of a single language:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Introduction to Arabic language and culture. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Arabic. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (020747)
Prerequisite: ARAB 101A.
Continuation of ARAB 101A. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Arabic. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (020748)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
This course is an independent study of special problems and is offered for 1.0-3.0 units. 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (021060)

Note: ARAB 199 must be taken for 3 units.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Introduction to Chinese language and Culture. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading and writing Chinese. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (020752)
Prerequisite: CHNS 101A.
Continuation of CHNS 101A. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (020753)
Introduction to the ancient Greek language and culture. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of reading, pronunciation, and composition in ancient Greek. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (020745)
Continuation of GREK 101. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of reading, pronunciation, and composition of ancient Greek. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (020746)
Introduction to the Modern Hebrew language and culture. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Modern Hebrew. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (020724)
Continuation of HBRW 101A. Emphasis is on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Modern Hebrew. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (020725)
Prerequisites: Faculty permission.
This course is an independent study of special problems and is offered for 1.0-3.0 units. 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (020944)

Note: HBRW 199 must be taken for 3 units.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Introduction to the Japanese language and culture. Emphasis on the development of fundamental skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing with clear understanding of basic sentence structures. Acquisition of Hiragana and Katakana characters (phonetic symbols). 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (005334)
Prerequisite: JAPN 101 or faculty permission.
Continuation of JAPN 101. Special attention to different verb forms and essential auxiliary expressions. Appropriate language use in a variety of social settings. Acquisition of 110 Kanji characters (ideographic symbols). 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (005335)
Introduction to Russian language and its associated cultures. Emphasis on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Russian. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (008916)
Prerequisite: RUSS 101A.
Continuation of RUSS 101A. Emphasis on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Russian. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This is an approved General Education course. (008920)

Period/Area Studies: 9 units

3 courses selected from:

Choose one course from each of the 3 groups:

English:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Written Communication (A2) requirement; ENGL 276, ENGL 340.
An introduction to Shakespeare's principal plays, his art, his age, and his critics; designed especially for English majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. (003507)
Study of twentieth-century British, American, Continental, and Latin American poetry. 3 hours seminar. (003543)
Prerequisites: ENGL 340; ENGL 278 or ENGL 279.
An intensive study of major authors in American literature. Authors vary by semester. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (003566)
The study of modern world literature. Works may vary from semester to semester and focus on one region or culture (such as India, Africa, or the Caribbean), or several regions or cultures. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (003577)

History:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Political and cultural developments in the Greek world from the time of the Trojan War through its transformations under Alexander the Great, and later, the Roman Empire. The "Classical" periods of the city-states Athens and Sparta are our particular focus. Key themes include transitions in economics, literature, art and architecture, society, and the various ways in which Hellenism spread throughout the Mediterranean. 3 hours lecture. (021305)
Political and cultural development of Rome from its (legendary) foundation in 753 BCE through the transformation of the Western Roman Empire in 476 CE. The collapse of Rome's Republic, the rise of military dictators, and the imperial "Golden Age" are the main focus. 3 hours lecture. (021306)
Cultural, economic, and political evolution of eastern Asia from antiquity to 1800. Emphasis on common traditional heritage of China and Japan. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004560)
New ideas about power and social structure in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Europe: Humanism, socio-political transformations, secular attitudes in art and society. 3 hours seminar. (004592)
The breakdown of religious consensus among Europeans; the people and directions of Reform; technology and the military revolution of the period; rulers, people, and the idea of revolution; the reconsolidating of a European elite. 3 hours seminar. (015755)

Art History:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
In-depth investigation of special areas of interest in art history, based upon particular faculty competencies and student interest. Recent topics include Visual Cultures of the Mediterranean, 1-1000 CE; Art of the 1960's & 1970's; Monsters and the Monstrous; and Monster Movies. 3 hours lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. This is an approved Writing Course. (000856)
In-depth thematic study of medieval art and architecture. The course is thematic, with emphasis on religion, geography, sexuality, race, and monstrosity. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (000843)
An investigation of artists and issues in the global contemporary art world. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (000838)
An investigation of the art of the ancient Maya of Mexico and Central America prior to European contact, from the Preclassic to Postclassic periods. The relationship of art to religious beliefs and practices will be explored, as well as the development of local styles associated with royal courts. Sites discussed include Tikal, Palenque, Copan, Uxmal, and Chichen Itza 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (020618)
An investigation of the arts and cultures of the African continent, with major emphasis upon the Negroid peoples south of the Sahara, the medieval kingdoms of the Sudan and the rain forest cultures and great civilizations of Ife, Benin, and the Congo, the sculpture, painting, body art, architecture, music, dance, belief systems, aural tradition of folklore, and reciprocal influences with other continents will be considered. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (000853)

Electives: 9 units

3 courses selected from:

Select 3 courses from the disciplines below or any of the courses above in Period/Area Studies.

Art and Art History

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
In-depth study of Greek art and architecture. The course is thematic, with emphasis on gender, sexuality, race, and cultural identity. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (000858)
In-depth study of Roman art and architecture. The course is thematic, with emphasis on the political, religious, and social elements of Roman art and architecture. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (000860)
An investigation of the history of modern art from the early-to-mid twentieth century. The course covers such movements as Cubism, Expressionism, Constructivism, Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, and Minimalism. An emphasis is placed on understanding how art relates to critical debates and social and historical contexts. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (000777)
A survey of ancient Mexican art and culture of formative, classic, conquest, including the Olmec, Teotihuacan, Zapotec, Mxtec, Classic Gulf Coast, Toltec, and Aztec. Sites discussed include El Tajin, La Venta, Monte Alban, Mitla, Tula, and Tenochtitlan 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (000841)
Prerequisites: ARTH 120.
This course is also offered as CHLX 473W.
A survey of Mexican art and culture from the Cortesian Conquest, the Colonial Period of monastery- and church-building, the Revolution of 1810, the Revolution of 1910, and the painters of the great revolutionary mural movement that followed, Rivera, Orozco, and Siqueiros, to contemporary artists who have tended toward international pluralism. Attention is given to the process of acculturation that produced the modern Mexican peoples, their national character, and their contemporary art. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (000842)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Written Communication (A2) requirement.
This seminar investigates the history of the discipline and allows students to develop methodological skills needed for art historical research. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. (000869)

Cultural Anthropology

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Case study examination of fundamental concepts, methods, and changing theoretical orientations of cultural anthropology. 3 hours lecture. (000507)
Language as a symbolic communication; structural, comparative, and sociolinguistics; analysis of English and non-western language data. 3 hours discussion. (000508)
This course is also offered as AIST 362W.
Native peoples of California: their origin, prehistory, languages, and pre-contact cultural practices, such as subsistence, settlement, socio-political organization, and ceremony, with the local area highlighted. Interactions with Europeans are also discussed. Emphasis is placed on the archaeological and ethnographic records. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000519)
This course examines Muslim cultures in the daily, national and global contexts in which Islam is practiced. Students read ethnography, fiction, history, and poetry in order to appreciate, respect and understand contemporary Islamic cultures. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021354)
This course is designed to provide a foundation in the methodological and theoretical underpinnings in contemporary museum education, with an emphasis on application through exhibits, outreach programs, and visitor experiences. The course focuses on all aspects of the educational role of museums in their communities, the historical developments in the field, and current issues facing museum educators, which includes promoting diversity and civic engagement within the educational setting of a museum. 3 hours laboratory. (021649)
This course focuses on the creation of an actual museum exhibit for the annual spring Museum of Anthropology student-created exhibition. Students are required to undertake all phases of the research and design process and final installation. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (000621)

English

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A survey of British literature from Beowulf to mid-1700s. 3 hours lecture. (003472)
A survey of British literature from mid-1700s to the twentieth century. 3 hours lecture. (003473)
The course focuses on developing analytical approaches to literary genres, primarily short stories, novels, poems, and plays. Required of English majors by end of junior year in preparation for upper-division course work in English. 3 hours lecture. (003431)

International Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A stylistic and thematic analysis of major works in French, German, Hispanic, Italian, and other literatures in English translation. Course content varies each semester according to language area taught. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. (003767)

   Or up to 3 literature courses in a foreign language:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: FREN 301, FREN 302, or FREN 303.
A survey of French literature with special emphasis on genres, literary techniques, and methods of analysis, early French literature to the French Revolution. 3 hours discussion. (003815)
SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: FREN 301, FREN 302, or FREN 303.
A survey of French literature with special emphasis on genres, literary techniques, and methods of analysis, Romantic to Contemporary Period. 3 hours discussion. (003816)
SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: FREN 301, FREN 302, or FREN 303.
This course involves study of literature and society in Francophone Africa from the Maghreb (Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria) through Senegal and West Africa to Madagascar and the Reunion Island, New France (Quebec), the French Caribbean, the South Pacific (Tahiti), and Southeast Asia (Vietnam, Cambodia). 3 hours seminar. (003828)
SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: GERM 201 or Instructor permission)
Study of selected works, themes, movements, genres, or authors in German literature. Content varies. Topics are announced each semester offered. 3 hours discussion. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 12.0 units. (021815)
SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: SPAN 301.
Introduces students to the study of Hispanic literature and culture, and develops their skills in language comprehension and analysis of prose, poetry, and drama. The works studied will be short stories, full-length plays, and Hispanic-American narrative and lyric poetry. SPAN 341 and SPAN 342 are required of all majors and count as electives for the minor. Either fulfills the prerequisite for all other upper-division literature courses. 3 hours discussion. (009140)
SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: SPAN 301.
Introduces students to the study of Hispanic literature and culture, and develops their skills in language comprehension and analysis of prose, poetry, and drama. Works studied will be the novel, one-act plays, and Peninsular Spanish narrative and lyric poetry. SPAN 342 is required of all majors and fulfills the prerequisite for all other upper-division literature courses. 3 hours discussion. (009141)
SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: SPAN 301; SPAN 341 or SPAN 342; or faculty permission.
Readings and reports on literature of Mexico from pre-Columbian to contemporary literature. 3 hours discussion. (009168)

History

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Political, social, and cultural history of the Byzantine Empire from the time of Diocletian and Constantine (ca. 300 C.E.) to the fall of the empire in 1453 C.E. The course focuses on key political institutions, social practices, and cultural attitudes and ideas that shaped the Byzantine world during this time. Major themes and topics include the nature and evolution of the Byzantine state; the empire under Justinian; Byzantium after the Islamic conquests; the Macedonian Renaissance and Imperial Revival; the Komnenian Empire and the Crusades; and society and culture in the late Byzantine period. 3 hours lecture. (021628)
A survey of European history from the defeat of Napoleon in 1815 to the present. Among the topics covered is the first and second industrial revolutions, the emergence of political ideologies, the unification of Italy and Germany, the rise of the workers movement, the spread of imperialism, women's lives and the birth of the women's movements, modernism, the First World War and its consequences, the Russian Revolution, the emergence of fascism and Nazism, the Second World War and its aftermath, the birth of the European Community, experience of the Cold War in Europe, decolonization, and the collapse of communism. 3 hours lecture. (021309)
This course is also offered as MEST 302, RELS 302.
This course introduces students to the sacred scripture and prophet of Islam. Students study the biography of Muhammad (570-632) and the text of the Qur'an by situating it within the context of Muhammad's life and career. By the end of the course, students are able to appreicate how devout Muslims view Muhammad and the Qur'an, as well as ask critical questions raised by modern scholars of religion. 3 hours lecture. (020263)
This course is also offered as MEST 362.
Introduction to some major aspects of culture, society and the state in the Islamic Middle East, including Islamic religion, the Arab Empire, the family, law, roles of men and women, styles of living. Examination of the post-Mongol empires of Ottoman and Safavid, and their interaction with European powers in the early modern period. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004550)
This course is also offered as MEST 362W.
Introduction to some major aspects of culture, society and the state in the Islamic Middle East, including Islamic religion, the Arab Empire, the family, law, roles of men and women, styles of living. Examination of the post-Mongol empires of Ottoman and Safavid, and their interaction with European powers in the early modern period. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021461)
Cultural, economic, and political evolution of eastern Asia from 1800 to the present. Emphasis on the transformation of the traditional heritage of China and Japan through revolution and modernization. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004561)
This course offers a seminar on the later Roman Empire (or "Late Antiquity") from Diocletian (284 C.E.) to Heraclius (641 C.E.). Throughout the course, we focus on the key political institutions, social practices, and cultural attitudes and ideas that shape the late antique world during this time. Major themes and topics include the Christianization of the Roman world; the emperor Constantine; barbarian entry into the Roman world; the emperor Constantine; barbarian entry into the Roman world; the disintegration of the western empire in the fifth century; cultural change in the East under Justinian; economic and urban change (the end of the Roman city); and the intellectual traditions surrounding the "fall" of the Roman Empire. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (021627)
Political, social, and cultural history of the British Isles from the advent of the Tudors through the demise of the Stuarts. This course examines the transition from a medieval society to modern Britain, by focusing upon change and continuity in matters of government, religion, gender and the economy. 3 hours seminar. (004523)

Honors

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program.
In this course we investigate and discuss the concept of beauty. What does it mean to say that something is beautiful, or to say that one finds something beautiful? We investigate the concept of beauty, and related concepts, from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Philosophy, art, history, biology, psychology, sociology, anthropology, and other academic fields all have important things to say about what beauty is, what it has been taken to be, and the roles that beauty plays and has played in human life. 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours seminar. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. (021401)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program.
This seminar explores the concept of justice from the perspective of a variety of historical, literary, and philosophical traditions. Students examine the history of the concept of justice and the connections between understandings of justice/fairness and social arrangements. Examples from the arts--including novels, poetry, painting, and/or film--illuminate the changing notions of basic social structure, identity politics, feminism, just war theory, and cosmopolitanism. 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours seminar. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. (021398)
Prerequisite: Active standing in Honors Program
. In Agents of Change we consider the nature of global citizenship and how to create a civically engaged life defined by personal and collective acts in service to the public good. Understanding how to increase the impact and quality of these acts using disciplinary expertise, interdisciplinary scholarship, and collaboration is also emphasized. Readings covered in the course encourage students' personal discernment of values, ethics, and commitments towards contributing to the public good in meaningful ways. We learn how to affect small and large scale social change and how a connected life is grounded in communities of civic practice. Students develop their personal theory of change informed by their discipline and study best practices in civic engagement, social movement, and organizational change efforts. We also learn how to overcome common obstacles to affecting change (personal, political, economic, social) and work with community leaders, departments, and disciplinary advisory boards to create a civic engagement infrastructure for the campus. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. (021400)
This course is team taught across several disciplines: biology, ecology, political economy, sustainability, intellectual history, and literary and cultural studies. Examines the ways people have thought about their relationship to the world, particularly in North America and the American West. Examines how ideas are shaped by environment, and the ways in which different cultures have affected the environment. This course evaluates the sustainability of past and current relationships to the land, and also considers a number of future possibilities for positive change. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (020913)

Music

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Written Communication (A2) requirement, MUSC 102.
This course covers the chronological development of Western music from antiquity to the mid-19th century through a study of literature, scores, recordings, films and live performances. Course content focuses primarily on the Baroque, Classical, and Early Romantic periods. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. (006152)
Prerequisites: MUSC 102 and faculty permission.
This course covers the chronological development of Western music from 1850 to the present through a study of the literature, scores, recordings, films, and live performances. 3 hours lecture. (006153)
Prerequisite: MUSC 102.
A survey of world traditions concentrating on Africa, Asia, and the Americas. For students with a background in music. 3 hours discussion. (006170)

Philosophy

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Western philosophical thought from the pre-Socratics through Stoicism, including movements and figures such as Pythagoreanism, Plato, Aristotle, and Epicureanism. 3 hours lecture. (007181)
Western philosophical thought from the Renaissance through Kant, including Bacon, Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. 3 hours lecture. (007182)
The phenomenological movement and its impact on philosophy, literature, and psychology, with attention to Husserl's views on mind, body, and intersubjectivity and Heidegger's ideas of being-in-the-world, authenticity, and death. 3 hours seminar. (007204)

Religious Studies

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This discussion-centered, project-directed course is a complement to RELS 200 (Religion in South Asia). It introduces elementary concepts of comparative religion and the basics of East Asian history. Afterward, it provides basic knowledge of major traditions and important 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Writing Course. (021568)
This course introduces students to the formation and early history of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam with a a special focus on the scriptural traditions of those three religions. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (021561)
Prerequisite: RELS 306 for RELS majors only.
This course explores the development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam from the crusades to the modern era. Major topics include the teachings of each tradition on war, peace, and conflict; religious diversity among the three traditions, especially in response to modernity and globalization; and the role of ritual in the three traditions. 3 hours lecture. (021416)
What is the place of human beings in the natural world? Do humans have a responsibility to other species? Are human beings primarily of nature or above or apart from nature? Is the proper role of humans to manipulate and control the natural world or to harmonize and conform their lives to the ways of nature? How have different beliefs about the existence or non-existence of divine or supernatural beings influenced human attitudes and behaviors toward the natural environment? What are some of the ways in which religions have shaped attitudes towards nature in specific historical and cultural contexts? What kinds of ritual practices do different cultures engage in concerning the natural world? This course considers a variety of religious and secular perspectives on these questions as well as responses to contemporary environmental issues, such as pollution and climate change. Special attention is given to the perspectives and practices of indigenous cultures. 3 hours seminar. (021621)
A study of the history, theories, and methods of religious studies as a scholarly and academic discipline, with emphasis on the biographical and historical contexts of significant contributors to the discipline and their classic works. Topics include secular vs. religious approaches to the study of religion and the contrast between religious insiders' and outsiders' perspectives; alternative theories of the origins and functions of religion; and debates over whether religion is a positive or negative influence in the lives of individuals and social groups. 3 hours seminar. (008191)

Theatre Arts

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: THEA 150, THEA 250.
This course is a survey of the theoretical and historical trends in performance from the ancient world to the advent of realism in the 19th century. Students discover key moments in the theatre history as well as signature scripts which represent the theatrical world of antiquity to Western Europe in this time frame. Students focus on the intersections of popular culture, political and social trends, and theatre through antiquity, the medieval period, the Renaissance, Neoclassicism, and Realism. 3 hours lecture. (021169)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Written Communication (A2) requirement, THEA 250
This course is a survey of the theoretical and historical trends in performance from the 19th century to the contemporary period. Students discover key moments in theatre history as well as signature scripts which represent the theatrical world of America and Western Europe in this time frame. Students engage in critical written and oral discourse about the nature of theatres, dramaturgy, and history. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. (009232)

Electives Requirement:

To complete the total units required for the bachelor's degree, select additional elective courses from the total University offerings. You should consult with an advisor regarding the selection of courses which will provide breadth to your University experience and possibly apply to a supportive second major or minor.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  • You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  • You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  • Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  • Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  • Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  • Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

To be eligible for Honors in the Humanities Program, students must have completed at least 30 units of course work in the major with grades that place them in the top 5% of Humanities majors. Students will enroll for 6 units of credit in HUMN 499H.

Humanities and Art History Double Major

Students may elect a Humanities and Art History double major. Up to 9 units of appropriate upper-division Art History (ARTH) courses may be applied to the Humanities major. Prior approval by a department advisor and the chair is required.

Catalog Cycle:20