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The Minor in African American Studies

Course Requirements for the Minor: 21 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required of all candidates for this minor.

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Introduces the aims and objectives of African American Studies. A critical examination of the African American experience and its antecedents. This includes an assessment of how the dominant society impacts African Americans, including such factors as racism, poverty, and the current social/economic status of African Americans. Africa's contributions to the world are included. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000136)
An introduction to the concepts, terminology, and issues in multicultural and gender studies, including exploration of America's multicultural history, gender as an element of culture, and contemporary issues in the field. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (002602)

Humanities: 3 units

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as HIST 231.
An examination of the history of persons of African descent in the United States and its colonial antecedents. Emphasis is on understanding the experiences of and culture created by African Americans from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000138)
This course is also offered as MUSC 296.
A historical survey from the African heritage and Colonial times to the present. The types, forms, and styles of African American music are studied in relation to the African American experience. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000141)
This course explores the way place, socio-economic status, gender, and sexuality inform and inflect the experience of particular cultural groups set against the larger American culture. Classes typically focus on African American, Asian American, Chicana/o, or Native American literature. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021237)

Social Sciences: 6 units

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course examines the significance and impact of Black athletes on the culture, economy, race relations, and internal dynamics of the United States. Historic in scope, the role of Black athletes and members of the USA's various Black communities are examined with particular emphasis on key sports such as boxing, baseball, basketball, football, gymnastics, and track and field. The emergence of Black women in modern athletics also receives careful review in addition to Black gay and lesbian athletes' voices on their dual sexual and racial identities. These issues and other sports-contextual situations are analyzed critically as we uncover the complexities of African Americans and class, gender, sexuality, and sport. 3 hours lecture. (022028)
Exploration of the many changes and challenges Hip-Hop Culture has undergone since the late 1970's and the introduction of "Rapper's Delight". Focus on the gradual emergence of five elements of the culture: 1) Graffiti writing, 2) DJing, 3) Break Dancing, 4) Rapping, and 5) the "culture of Hip-Hop, including Hip-Hop language, clothing, hair, and artifacts such as hats, jewelry, and clothing brands. Critique of the most controversial figure in the history of Hip-Hop, Tupac Shakur. Analysis of the themes of misogyny, homophobia, sexism, gang affiliation, gun violence, drugs, police brutality, and social activism. Course format is lecture, discussion, and video screening/analysis, with writing and oral presentation components. 3 hours lecture. (021990)
Prerequisites: AFAM 170 or SOCI 100.
This course is also offered as SOCI 355.
This course examines the historical and social experiences that have shaped contemporary African American life, such as slavery, exploitation, oppression, and resistance (for example, the Civil Rights movement, the Black Power movement, and Hip Hop). Strategies for researching African American experiences are learned through analysis of Black popular culture, male/female relationships, urbanization, religion, and institutional racism. 3 hours lecture. (000140)
This course provides a focus on academic development, leadership, empowerment, guidance, and support for all interested students, from the perspective of women of color. Authors read in the course and guest speakers predominantly are successful women of color in leadership roles. The course draws upon women's and cultural leadership development models to help provide an expanded sense of social and academic purpose. In addition, this course provides the student with the opportunity to synthesize their college and life experience to create a personalized leadership plan. Students explore theoretical and practical approaches of leadership development in the areas of academic excellence, personal values, community service, and career integration. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (021987)
This course is also offered as SOCI 488.
This course is designed to introduce key issues of mass incarceration and the prison industrial complex (PIC), to critique efforts that uphold and those that attempt to dismantle it, and to study contemporary writings about the PIC. We focus on a number of ideas regarding the economic, social, political, and cultural consequences of U.S. mass incarceration. Additional objectives for this course include: clarifying core issues of the PIC; investigating its impact on society; examining theoretical and activist approaches to challenges of the PIC; studying ways in which race and racism, social class, gender, immigration policy, and capitalism are profoundly woven into the PIC; and practicing and improving written and verbal communication skills; and exercising analytical thinking. 3 hours lecture. (021926)

Minor Capstone: 6 units

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A seminar designed to complement the 120-hour fieldwork portion of your service/advocacy/activism internship in the area of multicultural, gender, and/or sexuality studies. Learn and practice the kinds of thinking, researching, and skill building that enhances any service and activism work you may choose to do in the future, as well as what you are engaged in during your internship. In order to pass this course you must receive a review of at least "satisfactory" from your fieldwork supervisor. No more than 3 units may be counted toward the major or minor. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. (005647)

MCGS 389 must be taken for 3 units.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Written Communication (A2) requirement.
Exploration of theory and extended research in the field of multicultural and gender studies leading to a public presentation. This course is designed as the capstone experience for multicultural and gender studies majors and minors. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. (002610)
SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Catalog Cycle:20