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The Bachelor of Science in Plant and Soil Science

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 39 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Major Academic Plans page or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

Courses in this program may complete more than one graduation requirement.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

This major has approved GE modification(s). See below for information on how to apply these modification(s).

  • ANSC 101 is an approved major course substitution for Life Sciences (B2).
  • AGRI 482W is an approved major course substitution for Upper-Division Social Sciences.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Upper-Division Writing Requirement:

Writing Across the Curriculum (Executive Memorandum 17-009) is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of four Writing (W) courses, two of which are designated by the major department. See Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog for more details on the four courses.  The first of the major designated Writing (W) courses is listed below.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Students design and execute applied agriculture research projects that seek to improve the management of agricultural enterprises. Students learn the most common experimental designs for agricultural research, utilize computer programs to analyze and interpret experimental data and further develop scientific writing skills. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour discussion. This is an approved Writing Course. (000223)

The second major-designated Writing course is the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GW) (Executive Order 665). Students must earn a C- or higher to receive GW credit. The GE Written Communication (A2) requirement must be completed before a student is permitted to register for a GW course.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Course Requirements for the Major: 78-85 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree. Additional required courses, depending upon the selected option are outlined following the major core program requirements.

Major Core Program: 57-60 units

Lower-Division Core: 33-35 units

6 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
The role of agricultural business in the economy. Introductory economic and business principles and their application to the solution of agricultural problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (000014)
Principles of operation, adjustments, calibration, and safety of wheel and track-type tractors including implements and equipment commonly used in California agriculture. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000164)
A college success course for agricultural majors new to California State University, Chico. The course will explore the academic and social opportunities and resources available to promote successful completion of the student's educational goals. 1 hour discussion. Credit/no credit grading. (000198)
Prerequisite: GE Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning Ready.
Summary of numerical data, distributions, linear regression, and introduction to statistical inference. Statistical software is used. 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (005501)
Plant structure, growth, reproduction, and responses to the environment. How humans modify plants and the environment to grow crops. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (007765)
Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or CHEM 111.
Soil biology, fertility, chemistry, physical properties, taxonomy and their applications to agricultural management and environmental enhancement. Relationships of soils to the world food supply and population. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007776)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An overview, using a scientific perspective, of farm animals. Highlights anatomy and physiology of farm animals, reproduction, nutrition, animal health, animal products, animal behavior, and pertinent social issues, such as animal rights. Includes human opportunity to influence trait inheritance, population densities, and productivity. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000419)
An introduction to the nutrition of domestic and wild animals with emphasis on appropriate nutrition for various activities. A survey of the integration of feed production and animal production systems. Computer formulation and analysis of diets to achieve desired performance levels of animals. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (000434)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: GE Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning Ready, Intermediate Algebra.
A survey of the principles of chemistry, primarily for students in agriculture, industry and technology, and pre-nursing. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001826)
Prerequisites: GE Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning Ready; second-year high school algebra; one year high school chemistry. (One year of high school physics and one year of high school mathematics past Algebra II are recommended.)
Principles of chemistry for students in science and engineering programs. Topics include atoms, molecules and ions, reactions, stoichiometry, the periodic table, bonding, chemical energy, gases, and solution chemistry. The laboratory sequence supports the above topics including both qualitative and quantitative experiments, analysis of data, and error propagation. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001816)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or CHEM 111 or equivalent.
A survey of organic chemistry emphasizing the structure, properties, and reactions of all major functional groups of organic molecules. Not applicable towards a degree in chemistry or biochemistry. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001828)
Prerequisites: CHEM 111 with a grade of C- or better.
A continuation of CHEM 111. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, chemical thermodynamics, coordination chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The laboratory sequence supports the above topics including both qualitative and quantitative experiments, analysis of data, and error propagation. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001817)

6-8 units selected from:

In consultation with your advisor, choose from any major core course not previously selected or from the following courses.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Survey of microcomputer applications for agribusiness management, emphasizing personnel productivity software, including database manager, advanced spreadsheet, and electronic communication software. 3 hours lecture. (000025)
Introduction to the principles of farm accounting, farm business record keeping, agribusiness management, financial analysis, and enterprise budgeting. 2 hours lecture, 1 hour discussion. (000020)
Introduction to evolutionary history and biological diversity, microbes and protists, invertebrates, vertebrates, and plants. Form and function of plants and animals. Ecological principles. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. Formerly BIOL 152. (001123)
Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or CHEM 111; or department permission.
Introduction to biological molecules, bioenergetics, cellular structure and function, elements of molecular biology and genetics, and mechanisms of macroevolution and systematics. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. Formerly BIOL 151. (001122)
Prerequisite: BIOL 162 or department permission.
Introduction to plant and animal physiology and development. Laboratory consists of small group independent investigations of biological questions that include student-devised experiments; application of biological techniques, data analysis, and peer reviewed presentation of results. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. Formerly BIOL 153. (020284)
Prerequisites: High school biology, chemistry, or physics is recommended.
This course is a survey of the basic processes that determine flows of energy through the atmosphere and examines the subsequent interactions among water, landforms, soil, and vegetation that create and modify the surface of the earth. Students develop a recognition of landscape patterns, as well as an understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological principles and functions that create those patterns, in order to understand the natural environment in which we live and the role of humans affecting that environment. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. (003857)
Prerequisites: GEOS 165 or SCED 343 (may be taken concurrently); CHEM 111 (may be taken concurrently).
In-depth survey of the hydrologic cycle, and soil systems. Interactions between these systems are examined through case studies. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (020723)
Prerequisites: High school physics or faculty permission. High school trigonometry and second-year high school algebra or equivalent (MATH 051 and MATH 118 at CSU, Chico).
Mechanics, properties of matter, wave motion, sound, heat. Science majors are encouraged to take PHYS 204A instead of this course. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (007394)
Prerequisites: High school physics or faculty permission. Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of MATH 121 (second semester of calculus) or equivalent.
Vectors, kinematics, particle dynamics, friction, work, energy, power, momentum, dynamics and statics of rigid bodies, oscillations, gravitation, fluids. Calculus used. A grade of C- or higher is required before progressing to either PHYS 204B or PHYS 204C. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (007401)
A study of people, careers, crops, and systems related to crop industries in the area. An opportunity to meet with professionals and learn about the skills required for research, management, and services that support agricultural production. Meets the second half of the semester. 1 hour lecture. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 3.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (007779)
An evaluation of various decisions made in the management of fruit and nut trees. Management topics include studies of climate zones, soil selection, financing, farm organization, irrigation systems, field layout, varietal selection, nutritional needs, harvesting, labor management, marketing, and budgeting. The student is required to prepare a budget and calendar of orchard operations. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (021078)
Greenhouse construction, environment, and management practices, including heating and cooling, irrigation, fertilization, and pest control. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007818)
Resources and needs for outdoor recreation experiences. Study of historic, social, political, economic, and environmental factors influencing natural resources recreation at federal, state, and local levels. Survey of conflicts in natural resource land use. Field trips may be required. 3 hours lecture. (008782)

Upper-Division Core: 24-25 units

3 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: Completion of lower-division core or faculty permission.
An interdisciplinary treatment of physical and biological environments used for agriculture. Historical and ecological nature of agriculture its impact on the landscape and society. Comparison of sustainable and non-sustainable agricultural practices. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000206)
Prerequisites: GE Written Communication (A2) requirement, senior standing or instructor permission.
An examination of major issues confronting agriculture emphasizing critical thinking, research, and balancing complex, and often opposing views of the role of agriculture in society. The course uses group work and presentations to enhance written and oral communication skills. This is the capstone course for AGRI, ANSC, and ABUS majors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. (000229)
Students design and execute applied agriculture research projects that seek to improve the management of agricultural enterprises. Students learn the most common experimental designs for agricultural research, utilize computer programs to analyze and interpret experimental data and further develop scientific writing skills. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour discussion. This is an approved Writing Course. (000223)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: PSSC 250 or instructor permission.
Course examines the capacity of the soil to function within natural and managed ecosystems to sustain plant/animal productivity, maintain or enhance water and air quality, and support human health and habitation. Soil quality factors include biological, physical, and chemical soil properties. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (007808)
Prerequisites: PSSC 250 or faculty permission.
Properties of soils, fertilizers, and plant materials. Soil amendments and soil reaction effects on plants. Fertilizer usage. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007840)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: BIOL 161, BIOL 162, and BIOL 163, or faculty permission.
Advanced study of plant anatomy, morphology, physicology, ecology, and evolution. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (020280)
Prerequisites: BIOL 163 or SCED 102; CHEM 108 or CHEM 270; or faculty permission.
Functions in higher plants; water and soil relations, photosynthesis, respiration, enzyme action, and growth. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (001181)
Prerequisite: BIOL 161 or faculty permission.
Principles of plant classification with field study of local flora, emphasizing the higher plants and their phylogenetic relationships. 2 hours discussion, 6 hours laboratory. (001198)
Prerequisites: PSSC 101, PSSC 250 (or equivalents).
This course is designed to examine the yield potential of field crops in various environments. Students learn about the importance of crop physiology in crop production and breeding. Topics include canopy architecture and radiation interception, photosynthesis and respiration, carbon and nitrogen allocation, plant-water relationships, and plant response to restricted environments. The course provides practical experience using instrumentation to measure physiological processes in laboratory and field. Special emphasis includes design of field and greenhouse experiments. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (021698)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ABUS 101 or equivalent.
The application of economic and management principles to the planning, control, and organization of agribusiness firms. Linear programming applications, decision trees, inventory control, and equipment replacement. 3 hours lecture. (000027)
Prerequisites: ABUS 101 or faculty permission.
The economics of renewable natural resource use, management, development, and allocation. Conflicts in use, markets for resources, cases of market failure, and economic conservation will be discussed. 3 hours lecture. (015981)
Prerequisites: ABUS 101.
Principles and techniques of farm and ranch appraisal. Valuation of farm and rural resources. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000031)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: AGRI 331 or faculty permission.
A study of sustainable management practices in the context of agricultural land stewardship. The development of practical skills and understanding paramount to leadership and management of personal and professional activities. The focus is on identifying available resources, clarifiying goals, developing action plans, and promoting communication, savvy monitoring, and decision making that expedite progress toward a thriving enterprise and contribute to a sustainable community. Case studies, community activities, and discussion explore the impact of management decisions on progress toward desired goals. 3 hours lecture. (000225)
Prerequisites: AGRI 331; BIOL 446, PSSC 340, or PSSC 343.
An introduction to the principles and mechanisms of integrated management of insect pests, plant pathogens, and weeds, dealing with such areas as the agro-ecosystem, population dynamics, and specific approaches to pest management. 3 hours lecture. (007834)

2 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: AGET 150 or faculty permission.
Directed work and discussion on all aspects of field and row crop production practices applicable to northern California. 1 hour discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (007773)
Directed work and discussion on all aspects of vegetable crop production practices applicable to northern California. 1 hour discussion, 2 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 4.0 units. (007788)
Prerequisites: Junior standing, faculty permission.
This course is an internship offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Internship with private industry, state, federal, international, or non-profit organization. Selected topic must be in a Plant and Soil Science Option area. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (007824)

Major Option Course Requirements: 21-25 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required dependent upon the option chosen. Students must select one of the following options for completion of the major course requirements.  Use the links below to jump to your chosen option.



The Option in Crops and Horticulture: 23-25 units

This option prepares students to manage agricultural enterprises for the production of food, feed, fuel, fiber, and ornamental crops. It comprises protection of these crops and resources against pests (insects, diseases, weeds, and vertebrates) and stewardship of their natural resources (soil, water, air, and biota). The option emphasizes sustainable land use and crop production practices. This option equips students with skills to competitively pursue graduate education or other professional opportunities in agricultural consulting, production, conservation, research, and regulation.

2 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: ANSC 101 or PSSC 101; CHEM 107 or CHEM 111.
Mendelian inheritance, gene structure and action, sex-related inheritance, linkage and mapping, aneuploidy, polyploidy, population and quantitative inheritance, inbreeding and heterosis. 3 hours lecture. (000211)
Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or CHEM 111; PSSC 250.
An examination of materials and application methods used for protecting the health of plants in a manner that is safe for the environment, applicator, and consumer. Comprises the laws and regulations, safety, application, properties, mode of action, toxicology, and environmental impacts of pesticides, fertilizers, and other rmaterials used in agriculture. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007806)

Crop Production

2 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: PSSC 101 or PSSC 250 or faculty permission.
Design, management, and evaluation of landscape and agricultural irrigation systems for efficient water use. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000170)
An introductory course in horticultural production as therapy. Focus is on the therapeutic benefits available to people engaging in horticultural activities. Covers the special needs associated with elderly, veterans, children and adolescents, and people with disabilities. Overview of techniques and training requirements for therapists ion garden and greenhouse activates. Applicable to students in recreation, kinesiology, nursing, psychology and horticulture. This course fulfills a partial requirement for becoming a registered horticultural therapist. 3 hours lecture. (021807)
Prerequisite: PSSC 101.
This course covers the requirements and cultural practices needed for maximizing yields of annual field crops. Principles affecting growth development and management will be covered. For field experience, students are advised to enroll in PSSC 309A/PSSC 309B. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007810)
Prerequisites: PSSC 101 or PSSC 330.
Grasses and legumes; their production and management for irrigated pastures, hay, silage, and seed. Plant characteristics and adaptation. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007812)
Prerequisite: PSSC 101.
An experiential, field-oriented course covering origin, nutrition, environmental requirements, and management strategies for the sustainable production of vegetables. It provides students with the opportunity to appreciate the vast array of vegetables in the world and develop management skills for commercial production of vegetables in a sustainable manner. 3 hours lecture. (021404)
Prerequisites: AGRI 333, PSSC 101.
Managing and optimizing the fruit and nut production system. Selection of planting sites and varieties, tree training and pruning, pollination, thinning, irrigation, mineral nutrition, and pest management are included. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007820)

Agricultural Pests and Management

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: BIOL 163 or PSSC 101 or faculty permission.
Study of plant pathology encompassing parasitism and disease in plants, pathogen attack strategies, diseased plant physiology, plant defense mechanisms, environmental effects on disease and descriptions of diseases and treatments. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (001194)
A survey of the structure and function of insects, leading to a fundamental understanding of applied insect ecology and taxonomy. Particular emphasis is placed on arthropod species of economic importance to humans. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007797)
Prerequisites: AGRI 331.
Identification, modes of spread, and population ecology of weeds and other invasive plant species. Biological, cultural, mechanical, and chemical control of weeds and invasive species. Methods of crop/vegetation management to control and reduce weed populations. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007801)

Crops and Horticulture Electives

8-9 units selected from:

To fulfill the requirements of this option, select additional upper-division courses from the major core, option, listed courses below, or other courses in consultation with your advisor. Students may elect to take either PSSC 390 or PSSC 392 to satisfy up to 3 units of upper-division electives in this option. Check with your advisor on which on is most appropriate for your career path.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or faculty permission
Survey of the production, processing, and distribution of major agricultural commodities. The history, economics, scope, geographical location, general cultural practices, and marketing opportunities of major commodities are discussed. In addition, major issues confronting California agriculture systems are explored. A multiday field trip is required in the course. 3 hours seminar. (021777)
Prerequisites: At least 21 years of age.
Grape-growing, and winemaking in California wine regions. Wine and food matching. Sensory evaluation. 2 hours lecture, 1 hour discussion. (007781)
How ecological factors, technology, and human values interact to determine available choices of food and its production. Consequences of these choices in terms of community structures, resource allocations, and stability of agro-ecosystems. This course is not intended for majors, but open to them. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (004874)

OR (the following course may be substituted for the above)

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A study and analysis of various world agriculture systems that provide food and fiber. Environmental, technological, socio-economic, and political factors. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (000068)

The Option in Land and Soil Resource Management: 21 units

Students in this option explore the ecology, extensive management, and conservation of landscapes in the rural-urban interface. This option comprises an ecological and economic approach to protection, sustainable utilization of shared resources and habitats, and control of hazards pertaining to rangelands, wetlands, agro-forestry, and other ecosystems. It equips students with skills to competitively pursue professional opportunities in ecological assessment, natural resource conservation, research, soil science, environmental consulting, regulation, and graduate education.

Landscapes

1 course required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: PSSC 250 or faculty permission.
An examination of the factors of soil formation, criteria and systems of soil classification. The laboratory consists of five all-day field trips. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007837)

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: GE Written Communication (A2) requirement; BIOL 161 or faculty permission.
Some taxonomic background is recommended. Interrelationships among living organisms, field observations of such phenomena. Application of quantitative and qualitative methods to the interpretation of ecological phenomena. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. (001206)
Prerequisites: BIOL 161, BIOL 369.
The composition and distribution of plant communities, emphasizing the ecological, environmental, and evolutionary processes that affect them. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (020283)
Prerequisites: GE Written Communication (A2) requirement, BIOL 161, BIOL 350W.
Principles of ecology illustrated in the context of biotic communities. Field studies using quantitative and qualitative approaches. Laboratory segment offered at local field sites. 1 hour discussion, 6 hours laboratory. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. (001203)
Prerequisites: GEOG 101W, GEOS 102, PSSC 101, or PSSC 250; GEOG 211, GEOG 219, or AGET 340.
Systematic analysis of the origin and development of landforms. Emphasis is on the study of geomorphic processes using maps, air photos, and field data. 3 hours discussion. (003926)
Prerequisites: GEOG 101W, GEOG 211, GEOG 343, GEOG 390W or equivalents. Recommended: BIOL 161, BIOL 350W, GEOG 315.
Biogeography and landscape ecology are keys for evaluating plant and animal distributions at local to global spatial scales. This course seeks to understand the physical and biological processes that determine these patterns through time, as well as help design management strategies for conserving our planet's biological diversity, and thus ecosystem services. The course emphasizes nature and impact of continuity and patchiness of species distributions and movement, and material flow on the structure and dynamics of wildland, agrarian, and urbanized landscapes. This is thus a highly integrative field of inquiry, pulling on concepts, theories and data from general ecology, evolutionary biology, geology, and physical and human geography. Quantitative methods and field trips consider the biogeography of plants and animals in the local landscapes. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (003929)
Prerequisite: GEOS 101 or GEOS 102.
Geologic setting of California and historical development of its geologic provinces. The impact of earthquakes, volcanic activity, coastal erosion, and earth resources on California. Field trip required. 3 hours discussion. (004085)

Resources

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Application of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in agriculture and natural resource management. Identification and delineation of locations and areas; collection, analysis, storage, and retrieval of site and time specific data for agriculture and natural resource management and monitoring. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (000168)
This course provides an introduction to topics and technology in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course will combine a conceptual discussion of topics with practical exercises. Both the theory and practice of GIS analysis will be presented. 3 hours lecture. (021439)
Recommend: GEOG 320.
Study of the legal antecedents to California environmental impact legislation; analysis of environmental review procedures, environmental research, preparation and evaluation of EIRs, and conditional negative declarations. 3 hours discussion. (003949)
Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or CHEM 111; GEOS 265.
Principles and applications of major natural and anthropogenic pollution processes which include origins, transport, and sinks of contaminants in the environment. Topics include acid rain, mine waste and drainage, and agricultural pesticides. Environmental impacts, remediation and control of pollution are discussed. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (020373)
Prerequisites: PHYS 202A or PHYS 204A (may be taken concurrently).
A survey of the mass transfer processes and storage elements within the hydrologic cycle: precipitation, interception, surface runoff, infiltration, evapo-transpiration, soil water and groundwater. Quantitative methods for estimating flow and storage, use of probability concepts to predict extreme hydrologic events in a time series. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (004150)
Prerequisites: PSSC 101 or PSSC 330.
Grasses and legumes; their production and management for irrigated pastures, hay, silage, and seed. Plant characteristics and adaptation. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007812)

Management

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Study of the theory and practice of land use planning. Analysis of planning processes, elements of the comprehensive plan, zoning, environmental impact of development, regional policies, and growth. Includes investigation of a practical planning problem. 3 hours lecture. (003884)
Prerequisites: GEOG 101W; AGRI 331, BIOL 350W, BIOL 414, GEOG 343, GEOG 405S, or PSSC 330.
Pyrogeography is a comprehensive study of the physical and cultural parameters of fire. Topics covered include the spacial and temporal relationships of fire as an integral landscape process with an emphasis on the maintenance of North American ecosystems; the interpretation of the cultural uses of fire by indigenous communities as well as the historic and contemporary implications of fire management and policies; and the ecological implications of fire on biotic and abiotic systems. 3 hours discussion. (020415)
Prerequisite: GEOS 380 (may be taken concurrently).
Water-resources, management plans of world; emphasis on California and Israeli plans. Water plans in primitive, agrarian, and industrial societies. Data gathering and interpretation, regulation of water resources, and control of water pollution. 3 hours lecture. (004168)
A survey of North American rangeland resources and the principles of their use and management, including basic plant-animal-soil relationships and multiple uses. 3 hours lecture. (007775)
Prerequisites: PSSC 250 or faculty permission.
Properties of soils, fertilizers, and plant materials. Soil amendments and soil reaction effects on plants. Fertilizer usage. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (007840)
Prerequisite: RHPM 240 or faculty permission.
Managing the interactions between natural resources and users to ensure sustainable outdoor recreation. Carrying capacity, limits of acceptable change, competition, and complementarity among recreation uses and between recreation uses and other resource uses. Methods for monitoring recreational impacts, and approaches to managing resource quality and recreational opportunities. Field trips may be required. 3 hours discussion. (008843)

Land and Soil Resources Management Electives

9 units selected from:

To fulfill the requirements of this option, select additional upper-division courses from the major core, option, listed course below, or other courses in consultation with your advisor

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.
An examination of ecological principles and the impact of increasing population and technology upon the environment. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (001156)

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  • You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  • You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  • Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  • Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  • Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  • Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

Catalog Cycle:21