Skip to Side Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Accessibility Settings

The Bachelor of Science in Advanced Manufacturing and Applied Robotics

The Advanced Manufacturing and Applied Robotics faculty are committed to preparing graduates for a variety of careers in today’s modern manufacturing workplace. The faculty provide students with a broad undergraduate experience in math, science, business, and the humanities, as well as laboratory courses with a practical, applications orientation. The knowledge and skills gained will enable students to become Certified Manufacturing Technologists (CMfgT), after passing a comprehensive examination administered by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME).

Advanced Manufacturing and Applied Robotics Program Objectives

The program's objectives are best defined in terms of the following attributes of its graduates.

  1. First and foremost, graduates from CSU, Chico's Advanced Manufacturing and Applied Robotics program understand how products are designed, produced, and tested, while meeting the business, environmental, and social responsibilities associated with the production and development of goods.
  2. They have expertise in today’s modern manufacturing tools including automation, sensing, programming, and robotics.
  3. They understand the fundamental behavior of materials and the testing techniques used to determine material properties.
  4. They have a solid foundation of materials processing technologies including additive, subtractive, and nano-scale manufacturing techniques for metals, polymers, and composites.
  5. They are able to integrate project management, quality assurance methods, supply chain management, and the economic, technical, environmental, and societal issues involved in manufacturing.
  6. They are effective at communicating their ideas in oral, written, and graphical form.
  7. They function effectively as members of interdisciplinary teams.

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 120 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 39 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Major Academic Plans page or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

Courses in this program may complete more than one graduation requirement.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

This major has approved GE modification(s). See below for information on how to apply these modification(s).

  • Take one course in either Arts (C1) or Humanities (C2).  The other is waived.
  • AMAR 440B is an approved major course substitution for Lifelong Learning and Self-Development (E).
  • AMAR 360 fulfills Upper-Division Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning.

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Both courses must also satisfy one of the General Education requirements in order for 120 units to fulfill all requirements for the Advanced Manufacturing and Applied Robotics degree. It is suggested that USD and GC requirements be completed within the lower division Area C selection and the upper division Area C and D selections. See MAP.

Upper-Division Writing Requirement:

Writing Across the Curriculum (Executive Memorandum 17-009) is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of four Writing (W) courses, two of which are designated by the major department. See Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog for more details on the four courses.  The first of the major designated Writing (W) courses is listed below.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: GE Written Communication (A2) requirement, junior standing.
A study of effective industrial safety and supervisory management practices used in the manufacturing industry. Supervisory and managerial procedures used in industry by supervisors, managers, field and sales representatives, and inspectors. Instruction in communication, training, organization, ethics, conflict management, safety practices, and OSHA standards. Instruction in effective technical safety documentation - gathering, organizing, and reporting industrial safety data. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. Formerly SMFG 352W. (005670)

The second major-designated Writing course is the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GW) (Executive Order 665). Students must earn a C- or higher to receive GW credit. The GE Written Communication (A2) requirement must be completed before a student is permitted to register for a GW course.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Course Requirements for the Major: 90 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree.

Lower-Division Requirements: 39 units

14 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A modern introduction to fundamental manufacturing practices as well as cutting-edge industrial manufacturing process advancements. Hands-on practice in traditional and advanced manufacturing methods. Integration of Life Cycle Assessment and Reduce, Reuse, Recycle principles. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. Formerly SMFG 160. (005149)
Prerequisites: AMAR 160 (with a grade of C- or higher), MATH 119 or MATH 120, MECH 100, PHYS 202A or PHYS 204A. Recommended: MATH 105.
Industrial applications of subtractive and additive manufacturing. Traditional and advanced material removal techniques including the physics of metal-cutting, cutting-tool materials and geometry, conventional and semi-automatic machine tools, and electrical discharge machining (EDM). Additive manufacturing topics include 3D printing, rapid prototyping, and emerging additive manufacturing, processes and technologies. Also includes cost estimating and power management as applied to industrial scale manufacturing. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. Formerly SMFG 260. (005212)
Prerequisites: GE Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning Ready, Intermediate Algebra.
A survey of the principles of chemistry, primarily for students in agriculture, industry and technology, and pre-nursing. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001826)
An introductory survey of microeconomic analysis. Analysis of individual economic units: household, firms, and markets. Analysis of individual decision making. Supply and demand analysis. Type of market organization: competition, oligopoly, and monopoly. Discussion of current problems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002638)
Prerequisites: MATH 109 and MATH 119 (or high school equivalent), or MATH 120, or passing score on the Math department administered calculus readiness exam.
Provides Mechanical Engineering students an applications-based introduction to electrical and electronic components. Course topics include circuit analysis; the selection and use of components; applications of transistors and diodes; logic gates and digital circuits; microcontroller applications and interfacing with sensors; three-phase circuits and ideal transformers. Instruments used in the study of basic electronics are discussed, demonstrated, and used. Mechanical Engineering majors may substitute EECE 211L for this course. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This course requires the use of a laptop computer and appropriate software. (022099)
Prerequisite: GE Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning Ready.
Summary of numerical data, distributions, linear regression, and introduction to statistical inference. Statistical software is used. 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (005501)
Prerequisites: GE Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning Ready, and either 1/2 year of high school trigonometry or MATH 118 (may be taken concurrently).
Functions and graphs, including polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Systems of equations and inequalities, polar and parametric equations, complex numbers, and analytic trigonometry. 4 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (005504)
Corequisites: MECH 100L.
Introduction to engineering graphics. Orthographic projection, auxiliary views, isometric views, dimensioning, tolerancing, drawing standards, working drawings, free-hand sketching, solid modeling. 1 hour discussion. (015811)
Corequisites: MECH 100.
Introduction to solid modeling using a parametric, feature-based application software, SolidWorks. Solid modeling of parts and assemblies, detail and assembly drawings. 3 hours laboratory. (020257)
Prerequisites: MATH 119 or GE Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning Ready, first-year freshmen who successfully completed trigonometry and precalculus in high school can meet this prerequisite by achieving a score that meets department guidelines on the calculus readiness exam.
This course is also offered as MECA 140.
Introduces the design process and fundamentals of automation. Hands-on use of sensors, pneumatics, stepper motors, bearings, couplings, gears, belts, pulleys, and framing materials. Topics include AC and DC motor control, simple electrical circuits, machine controllers, PLC programming, testing and analysis of results, budgeting, and bills of materials. Teams design and build a proof-of-concept system to verify their design. 1 hour discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (005401)
Prerequisites: MECH 100 and MECH 100L.
A study of advanced topics in Engineering Graphics. Concepts include drawing standards, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, working drawings, model based definition, intermediate to advanced solid modeling, advanced assemblies, renderings, animations, equations, and design considerations. Preparation for advanced certifications in Engineering Graphics. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (015854)
Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or CHEM 111, PHYS 202A or PHYS 204A.
Corequisite: MECH 210L for MECA, MECH, and AMAR majors only.
Processing, structure, properties, and performance of engineering materials. Applied knowledge of material properties as engineering design parameters. Advanced manufacturing processes, including microfabrication are discussed. 3 hours discussion. (005402)
Corequisite: MECH 210 for AMAR, MECA, and MECH majors only.
Standards and procedures for materials testing. Hands-on experience with commonly used equipment for materials testing. Test data acquisition and integration for material properties. Presentation of test data and findings in technical reports. 3 hours laboratory. (021645)
Prerequisites: High school physics or faculty permission. High school trigonometry and second-year high school algebra or equivalent (MATH 051 and MATH 118 at CSU, Chico).
Mechanics, properties of matter, wave motion, sound, heat. Science majors are encouraged to take PHYS 204A instead of this course. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (007394)

Upper-Division Requirements: 51 units

15 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: MATH 105 and MATH 119 or MATH 120, MECH 140 (may be taken concurrently).
An introduction to programming and mathematical concepts encountered in advanced manufacturing. Mathematical concepts are presented in the context of their application to industrial automation and robotics. Students will learn modern programming tools and constructs common to the industry. Mathematical and programming concepts are applied in weekly laboratory exercises. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory. (022127)
Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or CHEM 111, MECH 210 (may be taken concurrently).
Survey of polymer chemistry, mechanical properties, and industrial processing of thermoplastics with emphasis on waste reduction and recycling. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. Formerly SMFG 316. (022071)
Prerequisite: AMAR 316.
An introduction to composite materials and processing. Topics include thermoplastic and thermoset composites, glass and carbon fiber reinforcements, biobased polymers and natural fibers, core materials, tooling, and thermoset processing equipment. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. Formerly SMFG 318. (022070)
Prerequisites: GE Written Communication (A2) requirement, junior standing.
A study of effective industrial safety and supervisory management practices used in the manufacturing industry. Supervisory and managerial procedures used in industry by supervisors, managers, field and sales representatives, and inspectors. Instruction in communication, training, organization, ethics, conflict management, safety practices, and OSHA standards. Instruction in effective technical safety documentation - gathering, organizing, and reporting industrial safety data. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. Formerly SMFG 352W. (005670)
Prerequisites: AMAR 260, MECH 200.
A study of computer numerical control (CNC) machine tools used in the manufacture of engineered products. Integration of computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software. Course activities utilize industrial scale CNC machining centers and lathes. Advanced manufacturing topics such as toolpath optimization and factory floor integration are introduced. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. Formerly SMFG 360. (005278)
Prerequisite: EECE 344 or MECA 380.
An overview of robotics and its application to advanced manufacturing. Topics include vision, motion planning, mobile mechanisms, kinematics, dynamics, and sensors. Course activities will utilize industrial scale robots and associated hardware as well as modern simulation tools. This course will also introduce contemporary topics in robotics research and its application. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (022128)
Prerequisites: GE Oral Communication (A1) requirement; GE Written Communication (A2) requirement; AMAR 360; AMAR 458 (may be taken concurrently). Recommended: MECA 380.
Design methods applied to manufacturing systems in group design projects. Project definition, planning, and management. Design for manufacture, cost considerations, budgets, and teamwork. Oral and written presentation of design results. Initial stage of the capstone design project to be continued in AMAR 440B. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours supervision. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. (022124)
Prerequisite: AMAR 440AW.
Implementation of the capstone design project from AMAR 440AW including fabrication, testing, and evaluation of a working prototype. Impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal context. Ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering including continuing self-education and career development. Must be taken the semester immediately following AMAR 440AW. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours supervision. (022125)
Prerequisites: OSCM 306 or faculty permission; MATH 105 or MATH 108 for Business majors only.
This course is also offered as OSCM 451.
The study and application of the quality management process in both the manufacturing and service sectors of the economy. Topics include process analysis and improvement, statistical process control, cost of quality, quality measurement, and quality in the global marketplace. 3 hours lecture. Formerly SMFG 451. (005784)
Prerequisites: Senior standing.
This course familiarizes students with techniques for managing technical projects while they design, plan, and implement a manufacturing project through the mock-up stage. Students work in groups on projects of mutual interest to gain experience in planning and updating schedules. Students learn to define requirements, estimate and manage resources, and structure decisions and trade-offs. Discussion includes global project management and supply chain responsibility. Emphasis is placed on group dynamics in communication and problem solving. 3 hours lecture. Formerly SMFG 458. (005291)
Prerequisite: AMAR 420.
A continuation of robotics and its application to advanced manufacturing. Implementation of smart manufacturing systems on the factory floor. Practical automation workflows based on parametric modeling, scripting, simulation, and optimization. Course activities will utilize industrial scale robots and associated hardware. This course will also introduce contemporary topics in robotics research applied to machine learning and artificial intelligence. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (022129)
Prerequisite: EECE 315 or MECH 210.
This course introduces the manufacturing processes for various classes of nanoscale devices from logic/memory semiconductors to nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS). Study of processes including photoresist lithography, ingot growth, ion implantation, chemical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition, and molecular beam epitaxy. Course covers the fundamental performance barriers for each material/device type and perform defect analyses to assess how defects either improve or degrade these materials. Also covered are financial aspects of nanoscale manufacturing including capital equipment costs, the financial history of these industries, return on investment, amortization, and case studies of both industry failures and successes. 3 hours lecture. Formerly SMFG 477. (021768)
Prerequisites: GE Written Communication (A2) requirement; MATH 105 and MATH 119, or MATH 121; junior standing.
This course provides a foundation for green engineering design through life cycle assessment and life cycle cost analysis considering economically viable, socially just, and environmentally sustainable solutions (triple bottom line). This course teaches quantitative environmental and economic assessment tools. decision-making strategies, risk, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty analysis. These skills are applied to real-world problems through group projects, emphasizing applied engineering, critical thinking, communication skills and teamwork. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Writing Course. This course requires the use of a laptop computer and appropriate software. (001495)
Prerequisites: EECE 211 and EECE 211L or EECE 215; and CSCI 111, MECH 208 or AMAR 300.
Measurement of steady-state and dynamic systems using standard laboratory instruments. Topics include calibration and dynamic response of instruments, statistical treatment of data, and applied feedback control systems. Concepts are reinforced with hands-on laboratory exercises. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (005420)
Prerequisites: Business Administration or Business Information Systems status required for business majors. Completion of GE Pathway Foundation Quantitative Reasoning required for all majors.
An overview of the operations function in organizations; topics include operations strategy, manufacturing philosophies, process selection, supply chain management, inventory management, forecasting, production planning and control, capacity planning, material requirements planning, quality management and project management. 3 hours lecture. (005774)

Technical Elective: 3 units

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: MECH 210.
This course provides students an introduction to composite materials and processing by investigating thermoplastic and thermoset composites, glass and carbon fiber reinforcements, biobased polymers and natural fibers, core materials, tooling, and thermoset processing equipment. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. Formerly SMFG 347. (021724)
Prerequisites: Approval of faculty internship coordinator prior to off-campus assignment.
Manufacturing experience in an industrial setting which provides an opportunity to apply academic learning to professional practice. Minimum duration of 400 hours of work under the direct supervision of an on-site manufacturing supervisor. On completion of the internship, a report prepared under the direction of a faculty member is required. This course is an elective for the BS in Advanced Manufacturing and Applied Robotics; a total of 3 units must be completed to receive elective credit. 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 3.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. Formerly SMFG 389. (005294)
Prerequisite: AMAR 160.
The course provides students a comprehensive overview of the study of metal casting technology. Students learn about the properties of casting allows, casting processes, pattern design, pattern making, mold making, core design, core making, heat treating, finishing of castings, and sand testing. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. Formerly SMFG 464. (005209)
Prerequisites: At least junior standing.
An in-depth study of federal and California employment laws as they affect the management of human resources, with appropriate consideration of ethical and global dimensions. Emphasis is on the legal rights and responsibilities of employers and employees in the employment relationship, primarily in a private-sector, non-union environment. 3 hours discussion. (001352)
This course explores the four fundamental pillars of intellectual property study: 1) patents 2) trademarks 3) copyrights 4) trade secrets. Balance is struck between theory (textbook content of the above four main areas) and practice (students applying theory in joint venture simulations). The text and lectures set out the theory, historical, and present context of intellectual property law. Beyond this, however, a critical component of the course shall focus on applying theory to practice. By semester's end, IP portfolios containing real world intellectual property forms and applications, are complied or constructed by entrepreneurial teams evidencing understanding of each of the four aforementioned domains of intellectual property. 3 hours discussion. (021776)
This course introduces students to qualitative and quantitative decision analysis techniques and practical tools for critical thinking and problem solving in business. A primary emphasis is on the problem solving process including problem identification, data collection and evaluation, analysis, consideration of alternatives, and the presentation of logical and persuasive conclusions. 3 hours lecture. (021798)
Prerequisites: ECON 103.
An overview of the economics of government regulation with emphasis on the formulation of regulatory policy, alternative methods of regulation, and the economic impacts of such policy. Topics may include environmental regulation, energy conservation policy, consumer protection, antitrust policy, and a critical evaluation of market-based regulatory policy. 3 hours lecture. (002668)
Prerequisites: CSCI 111 or MECH 208; MECH 320 (may be taken concurrently).
This course introduces students to robotic manipulation design and control. Students apply the concepts in computer simulation and a physical system. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (021920)
Using a combination of theory and application, this course focuses on the human side of organizations, including issues of 1) making good decisions, 2) enhancing performance, 3) steering through a turbulent global environment, 4) combining and unifying multiple business functions and 5) enabling change. Students gain an understanding of management and how and why organizations are structured. The themes of quality, technology, ethics, and adaptation are emphasized. 3 hours lecture. (005704)
Prerequisite: Junior Standing
This course introduces students to the concept of information systems as the application of technical resources to support organizational processes. Given this foundation, students build an integrative, process-oriented understanding of information systems and their deployment, management, and use within distributed and global organizations. Projects focus on introductory enterprise systems, fundamentals of database systems, and basic Web programming. This course is designed for BADM majors. 3 hours lecture. (005770)
Prerequisites: OSCM 306.
This course provides an overview of the supply chain management function in modern business. The objective of the course is to provide students with an integrative view of how supply chain decisions affect other functional areas of the firm and impact financial performance. The course focuses on three primary areas of supply chain management: strategy and design, planning, and operations. Business cases studies and enterprise information systems (EIS) are a central feature of the course with EIS providing a foundation for understanding the integrative nature of the business organization. 3 hours discussion. (007744)
Prerequisite: OSCM 306.
This course examines the business role and ethical consideration of purchasing and procurement. Students learn to identify supplier sources, negotiate terms and conditions of sale, and build and manage supplier relationships linked to organizational goals. Students learn how purchasing operates across all functional areas - including inbound logistics, manufacturing, and outbound logistics - and contributes to competitive advantage and added value through teamwork. 3 hours discussion. (021469)
Prerequisites: OSCM 306.
An in-depth study of inventory management and material requirements planning (MRP). Topics include the study of inventory systems and modeling, master production scheduling, and purchasing systems and control. 3 hours discussion. (005785)

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Catalog Cycle:21