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The Minor in Classical Civilization

Course Requirements for the Minor: 18-20 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required of all candidates for this minor.

Core: 3 units

1 course required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An overview of the artistic and intellectual heritage of the cultures of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Israel, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Medieval Europe, and Islam from their origins to 1500 C.E. Comparative analysis of music, art, architecture, and primary texts (theatre, philosophy and religion, literature, history, and political science). 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (015843)

Comparative Early Cultures: 3 units

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An examination of the data and major theories concerning the rise of civilizations, using as case studies early Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Mexico, and Peru. The significance of food production, ecology, writing, and the centralized state in the evolution of complex societies. 3 hours lecture. (000561)
A survey of ancient Mexican art and culture of formative, classic, conquest, including the Olmec, Teotihuacan, Zapotec, Mxtec, Classic Gulf Coast, Toltec, and Aztec. Sites discussed include El Tajin, La Venta, Monte Alban, Mitla, Tula, and Tenochtitlan 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (000841)
An investigation of the art of the ancient Maya of Mexico and Central America prior to European contact, from the Preclassic to Postclassic periods. The relationship of art to religious beliefs and practices will be explored, as well as the development of local styles associated with royal courts. Sites discussed include Tikal, Palenque, Copan, Uxmal, and Chichen Itza 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (020618)
An investigation of the art of Peru and adjacent regions prior to European contact. The relationship of art to religious beliefs and practices, political ideologies, and the significance of styles and technologies are examined. Cultures surveyed include Chavin, Paracas, Nasca, Moche, Tiwanaku, and Inka, as well as the Northern Andean civilizations such as San Agustin. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (020619)
This course introduces students to the formation and early history of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam with a a special focus on the scriptural traditions of those three religions. 3 hours seminar. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (021561)

Electives: 12-14 units

4 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
In-depth study of Greek art and architecture. The course is thematic, with emphasis on gender, sexuality, race, and cultural identity. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (000858)
In-depth study of Roman art and architecture. The course is thematic, with emphasis on the political, religious, and social elements of Roman art and architecture. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (000860)
An introduction to the literature of ancient Greece and Rome. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (003411)
Political, social and cultural history of the Greek world from the prehistoric period through the Hellenistic era. The classical period of the city-states of Athens and Sparta is the main focus of this course. Key themes include the development of the polis in Archaic Greece; the Persian Wars; Greek identity and culture; the Athenian democracy and empire; the Greeks' place in the broader Mediterranean world; and the role that classical antiquity played in the creation of the modern Greek state. 3 hours lecture. (021305)
This course examines Roman history from the founding of the city of Rome in the eighth century BCE to the early years of the Principate. This course focuses on the key political institutions, social practices, and cultural attitudes and ideas that shaped the Roman world during this time. Major themes and topics include the formation of Roman identity in the monarchic period; the nature of Roman imperialism; Roman state structures; the collapse of the Roman Republic, and Augustan Rome. 3 hours lecture. (021306)
Political, social, and cultural history of the Roman Empire of the Caesars from the Julio-Claudian emperors (14-68 C.E.) to the end of the Severan Dynasty (235 C.E.). Emphasis on the Julio-Claudian period, the achievements of Pax Romana, and the cultural transitions into Late Antiquity that emerged in the Second Century C.E. 3 hours discussion. Formerly HIST 406. (004587)
This course offers a seminar on the later Roman Empire (or "Late Antiquity") from Diocletian (284 C.E.) to Heraclius (641 C.E.). Throughout the course, we focus on the key political institutions, social practices, and cultural attitudes and ideas that shape the late antique world during this time. Major themes and topics include the Christianization of the Roman world; the emperor Constantine; barbarian entry into the Roman world; the emperor Constantine; barbarian entry into the Roman world; the disintegration of the western empire in the fifth century; cultural change in the East under Justinian; economic and urban change (the end of the Roman city); and the intellectual traditions surrounding the "fall" of the Roman Empire. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. (021627)
Western philosophical thought from the pre-Socratics through Stoicism, including movements and figures such as Pythagoreanism, Plato, Aristotle, and Epicureanism. 3 hours lecture. (007181)

OR (the following may be substituted for the above with department permission)

Up to 2 courses in Greek or Latin language (consult the Classical Civilization advisor for details).

Catalog Cycle:21