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The Minor in Multicultural Studies

Course Requirements for the Minor: 21 units

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required of all candidates for this minor.

Minor Core: 9 units

3 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
An introduction to the concepts, terminology, and issues in multicultural and gender studies, including exploration of America's multicultural history, gender as an element of culture, and contemporary issues in the field. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (002602)
A seminar designed to complement the 120-hour fieldwork portion of your service/advocacy/activism internship in the area of multicultural, gender, and/or sexuality studies. Learn and practice the kinds of thinking, researching, and skill building that enhances any service and activism work you may choose to do in the future, as well as what you are engaged in during your internship. In order to pass this course you must receive a review of at least "satisfactory" from your fieldwork supervisor. No more than 3 units may be counted toward the major or minor. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. (005647)

MCGS 389 must be taken for 3 units. This is a letter-graded internship.

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: GE Written Communication (A2) requirement.
Exploration of theory and extended research in the field of multicultural and gender studies leading to a public presentation. This course is designed as the capstone experience for multicultural and gender studies majors and minors. 3 hours seminar. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. (002610)

Ethnic/Racial/Cultural Identities: 9 units

No more than 6 units may be in any one of AAST, AFAM, AIST, or CHLX.

3 courses selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course is also offered as SOCI 152.
This course examines the Asian experience in the U.S. over the last 150 year by focusing on the experiences of different Asian ethnic groups. The focus is on early arrival and settlement, and contemporary issues in Asian American communities, including immigration, racism, and Asian American identity. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (000003)
This course is also offered as BLMC 330.
Study Hmong American roots, including: geographic, demographic, sociocultural, economic, political, religious, and historical elements from the countries of origin. Main emphasis is on how Hmong roots influence contemporary lives of Hmong Americans, starting with their immigration/migration and settlement/resettlement patterns and continuing on the present day. Students explore the complex patterns of Hmong American acculturation and identity, especially with respect to elements of gender, socio-economic class, ethnicity, age and education. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (021849)
Introduces the aims and objectives of Black and African American Studies. A critical examination of race and ethnicity as related to Black and African American people's experiences. This includes an assessment of how the dominant society impacts African Americans, including such factors as gender, sexuality, racism, poverty, and the current social/economic status of Black and African American people. The course includes Africa's legacy and diaspora in the U.S. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (000136)
This course examines the significance and impact of Black athletes on the culture, economy, race relations, and internal dynamics of the United States. Historic in scope, the role of Black athletes and members of the USA's various Black communities are examined with particular emphasis on key sports such as boxing, baseball, basketball, football, gymnastics, and track and field. The emergence of Black women in modern athletics also receives careful review in addition to Black gay and lesbian athletes' voices on their dual sexual and racial identities. These issues and other sports-contextual situations are analyzed critically as we uncover the complexities of African Americans and class, gender, sexuality, and sport. 3 hours lecture. (022028)
Exploration of the many changes and challenges Hip-Hop Culture has undergone since the late 1970's and the introduction of "Rapper's Delight". Focus on the gradual emergence of five elements of the culture: 1) Graffiti writing, 2) DJing, 3) Break Dancing, 4) Rapping, and 5) the "culture of Hip-Hop, including Hip-Hop language, clothing, hair, and artifacts such as hats, jewelry, and clothing brands. Critique of the most controversial figure in the history of Hip-Hop, Tupac Shakur. Analysis of the themes of misogyny, homophobia, sexism, gang affiliation, gun violence, drugs, police brutality, and social activism. Course format is lecture, discussion, and video screening/analysis, with writing and oral presentation components. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (021990)
Prerequisites: AFAM 170 or SOCI 100.
This course is also offered as SOCI 355.
This course examines the historical and social experiences that have shaped contemporary African American life, such as slavery, exploitation, oppression, and resistance (for example, the Civil Rights movement, the Black Power movement, and Hip Hop). Strategies for researching African American experiences are learned through analysis of Black popular culture, male/female relationships, urbanization, religion, and institutional racism. 3 hours lecture. (000140)
Prerequisite: AFAM 170.
In-depth exploration of current and emerging issues of particular relevance to Black/African American individuals and communities across the United States. Special focus on local and regional impact and/or influence. Topics might include self-representation in film; mixed racial/ethnic identities; cannabis use and societal perceptions; social movements; traditional culture and linguistic revitalization; gender and sexuality; economic development; law and politics; intergenerational trauma; literary, artistic, and cultural production; health and wellness; and education. 3 hours lecture. (022165)
This course is also offered as POLS 435.
This course is designed to expose students to an area of black political thought. Drawing on the works of black scholars from several disparate yet inter-related backgrounds and disciplines - political science, philosophy, sociology, history, feminist studies, and law - this course is structured around issues such as slavery, Reconstruction, Black Nationalism, race and racism, and feminism that are central to black political thought and African American politics. 3 hours lecture. (022162)
Introduction to the field of American Indian/U.S. Native American Studies. Primarily analyzes contemporary issues and initiatives, providing some background for present-day conditions. Focused study on American Indian sovereignty, debates on racial/ethnic designations, indigeneity, and the complexities of California tribal systems. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (000375)
This is an introduction course to American Indian and Indigenous film. We will center visual sovereignty and fourth world cinema by highlighting American Indian and Indigenous autonomy over representation. This course examines a range of cinematic genres such as documentaries, features, shorts, television, and independent films. Going beyond boundaries, this course looks at a global sampling of Indigenous films and genres. Through deep analysis of these genres, we investigate meaningful histories, contemporary responses to issues, debunking stereotypes, and moving toward finding the power within representing oneself and their community. This course critically examines how American Indian and Indigenous peoples use films as furthering projects of decolonization and where students can become informed about the articulations of aesthetic activism and accurate portrayals of lived realities. 3 hours lecture. (022187)
This course is also offered as ENGL 252.
Study of the oral and written literature of the American Indian and of related historical and critical materials. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000377)
This course critically examines American Indian/Native American/Alaska Native/First Nations/Indigenous Peoples storytelling through an Indigenous theoretical lens. The course intentionally situates studies that place Native people in present tense while honoring our ancestors that walked before us and preparing for future generations. The course builds on oral traditions in storytelling and requires students to reflect on their own relationship with stories to understand and analyze major issues in diverse communities. Native issues regarding survivance, women, gender, and sexuality are woven into the fiber of the course content. This course requires students to participate in oral and written storytelling that honors ancestors and demonstrates scholarly work through a public storytelling presentation. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (022181)
Prerequisite: AIST 170.
This course provides an in-depth exploration of current issues in contemporary American Indian communities, and focuses on relevance to local and regional tribes in Northern California. Topics might include ecology; traditional culture and linguistic revitalization; gender and sexuality; social and cultural movements; health and wellness; and education. 3 hours lecture. (021915)
Prerequisite: AIST 170 or instructor permission.
This course explores the concept of inherent sovereignty, traces the development of U.S. Federal Indian Law through landmark cases, and analyze the Federal-Tribal relationship today - especially within the state of California. Topics may include settler colonialism, Citizenship/(Dis)Enrollment & Recognition; Land-Allotment, Reorganization, Tribal Property, Land Management, Land Use Rights and SEQA; Gaming; Cultural Sovereignty; and Gender and Sexuality. This course is a combination of lecture, film screenings, discussion, research, writing, and engagement with the community. Students are expected to attend and participate actively in class. 3 hours lecture. (021994)
This course is also offered as SOCI 157.
This course explores contemporary issues affecting Latinx communities in the United States, including values, social organization, urbanization, gender, sexuality, and socio-economics. Special attention is paid to issues of colonialism, human rights, U.S. foreign policy toward Latin America, racism, capitalist globalization, migration, emerging political and economic shifts in the Americas, and new local and transnational efforts for social change on the part of Latin America's peoples and Latinx in the U.S. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (001973)
This course is also offered as MADT 203.
Viewing and analysis of Latinx and Chicanx films, from classics to contemporary popular and critical hits. Feature and documentary films are discussed in sociopolitical context and as cultural production. Special attention is paid to intersections between race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, socio-economic class, and other facets of Latinx identities. 3 hours lecture. (021921)
This course is also offered as POLS 328.
This course offers a survey regarding Latinos in US politics. It explores both the political history of Latino subgroups and contemporary analyses of Latino political behavior and socialization. 3 hours lecture. (022100)
This course is also offered as SOCI 358.
This course examines the identities and experiences of Latinx in contemporary society. From identity politics, to immigration policy, to the complex intersections of race, class, gender & sexuality, the broad spectrum of today¿s most pressing issues are investigated. Emerging or changing situations, events, and/or issues may be integrated into the class in any given semester. Latinx groups examined include heritage from throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. (001980)
Prerequisite: CHLX 157 or MCGS 310W.
An in-depth study of gender and sexuality diversity within Latinx communities, this course delves into gender and sexuality based societal expectations and resistance to them. Explore gender non-conforming, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and other lived experiences of diverse groups such as Chican@, Xicano, Latnix, and Blacktinos 3 hours lecture. (021868)
Prerequisites: CHLX 135, CHLX 157, CHLX 203, or CHLX 358; or instructor permission.
This course on immigration is a social-historical examination of the migration and settlement of Mexican, Caribbean, South American and Central American origin people to the Unites States. Attention paid to the diversity of race, ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic class of immigrant groups. The "creation" of the U.S.-Mexico border since 1848 has served to create one of the world's unique separation of nations that profoundly impact the lives of Mexican immigrants and the Chicanx community, as well as other Latinx immigrants who also must pass through the border. The social construction of the U.S.-Mexico border serves to develop a critical view of the economic, social, political, and cultural consequences of immigration. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. (021870)
Prerequisite: CHLX 135, CHLX 157, CHLX 203, or CHLX 358; or instructor permission.
This course examines the labor force participation of Latinx workers in the U.S. and Global labor market. Theoretical models of labor market inequality are also explored to acquaint students to the latest models. Empirical studies of global and U.S. market participation of Latinx populations guide students to the changing nature of those groups participation. Latinx groups examined are Chicanos, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Central Americans. 3 hours lecture. (021917)
Prerequisite: CHLX 157 or WMST 170.
Latina and Chicana women had been wielding power for centuries before feminism arrived, and now they are unstoppable. Find out how Xicana feminism challenged racism and sexism, how the activism of diverse Latinas has changed the landscapes of gender and ethnicity. Explore the complexities of Latina/Chicana power: political, social, spiritual, sexual, and artistic. 3 hours lecture. (021869)
This course is also offered as MCGS 458, WMST 458.
The course provides in-depth and advanced study of theories, analyses, and practical applications of leadership styles and structures, prioritizing those which consciously incorporate intersectional, inclusive, non-hierarchical and feminist approaches that center the marginalized. The course is meant to enhance practical leadership experiences as well as prepare you for the field of leadership in social justice movements, including the non-profit sector, government and policy advocacy. Additionally, a focus on learning to sustain ourselves and those we work with are a core area of study. 3 hours lecture. (021916)
Prerequisites: MCGS 155, WMST 170.
This course is also offered as MCGS 480, WMST 480.
An interdisciplinary and transnational study of sex work, sex tourism, pornography, queer desire, and BDSM, as well as an introduction to transgender history and transfeminist analysis. 3 hours lecture. (021914)
This course is also offered as SOCI 488.
This course is designed to introduce key issues of mass incarceration and the prison industrial complex (PIC), to critique efforts that uphold and those that attempt to dismantle it, and to study contemporary writings about the PIC. We focus on a number of ideas regarding the economic, social, political, and cultural consequences of U.S. mass incarceration. Additional objectives for this course include: clarifying core issues of the PIC; investigating its impact on society; examining theoretical and activist approaches to challenges of the PIC; studying ways in which race and racism, social class, gender, immigration policy, and capitalism are profoundly woven into the PIC; and practicing and improving written and verbal communication skills; and exercising analytical thinking. 3 hours lecture. (021926)
Queer and Trans California explores the history of the struggles endured by individuals and groups comprising LGBTQIA2S+ communities in the state of California (with substantive focus on Black, Indigenous, and People of Color-BIPOC), as well as the myriad ways in which LGBTQIA2S+ -identified folks here have found and employed their power. As part of this, we study key ideology, legislation, institutions (political, economic, and social), events, leaders, cultural production, and conflicts in California that have shaped the way diverse LGBTQIA2S+ peoples perceive their communities and are perceived by general society. 3 hours lecture. (022189)
Recommended: MCGS 310.
This course focuses on the hidden history of intersectional and internationalist queer and trans people of color activism, artistry, and scholarship. Course includes readings, films, videos, writing practice, and analysis; the latter half of the semester will focus on oral history texts and scholarship that uses oral history as a research methodology, which will serve as a guiding reference for students' own oral history projects. 3 hours lecture. (022190)
This is an interdisciplinary course which concentrates on the universal experiences of women around the world. The impact of international and domestic politics and culture on women, the role of women in economic development, equity issues, and women's role in the social movement are the centrality of the course. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. (021197)
This cross-cultural study of women emphasizes changing constructions of gender and gender relations from the Paleolithic period to the contemporary. The course looks at depiction's of women in the United States as they are related to the historical imagery. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000517)

Multicultural Issues: 3 units

1 course selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
This course analyzes leadership by focusing on male and cultural leadership development models and case studies of men of color in positions of power and influence. Guest speakers will be predominantly successful men of color in leadership roles. Course reading centers on identity development from the lens of men of color in educational settings. Students in this course examine theoretical and practical approaches of leadership development in the areas of academic excellence, personal values, civic engagement, self-efficacy, and career integration to identify custom pathways to success. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (022106)
This course provides a focus on academic development, leadership, empowerment, guidance, and support for all interested students, from the perspective of women of color. Authors read in the course and guest speakers predominantly are successful women of color in leadership roles. The course draws upon women's and cultural leadership development models to help provide an expanded sense of social and academic purpose. In addition, this course provides the student with the opportunity to synthesize their college and life experience to create a personalized leadership plan. Students explore theoretical and practical approaches of leadership development in the areas of academic excellence, personal values, community service, and career integration. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021987)
This course is also offered as RELS 224W.
This course covers the religions that inform America's various ethnic groups, and the historical, cultural, and social experiences and values of Native American, Hispanic-American, Arab-American, African-American, and Asian-American cultures. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021964)
This course is also offered as SOCI 240.
This fully online course facilitates the study of intersecting systems of oppression and inequity--in particular socio-economic class, ethnicity, and gender--all of which impact access to basic needs, especially healthy food. The course provides a scholarly, theoretical context for individuals working with communities outside of the middle class. Students are guided in the application of concepts and ideas in their personal lives and professional practice. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021867)
This course is also offered as POLS 327.
Analysis of the role of race and ethnicity in the American political process, including a critique of their role in local, state, and national elections. Factors accounting for participation and non-participation will be analyzed. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved US Diversity course. (000137)
This course is also offered as SOCI 350.
This course examines the social construction of race, and studies ethnic and racial relations in the United States, looking at variations by class, gender, and immigration experiences. Students analyze interpersonal relationships between racial and ethnic groups, discrimination, resistance, social movements, and governmental policies 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (005640)
Recommended: MCGS 155, MCGS 310, or WMST 170.
An exploration of how science and culture have affected people's understandings of gender and sexuality, in both Western and non-Western cultures, from ancient times to the present. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. Formerly MCGS 380. (005642)
Prerequisite: PHHA 321 for Public Health & Health Service Admin majors and Health Promotion minor.
Ethnic groups in the U.S. face many health problems. This course focuses on those problems which affect the four largest ethnic groups in the U.S.: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, and Asian Americans. The effects of history, health beliefs and practices, and socioeconomic status on the health of these ethnic populations are addressed. Current and potential strategies to improve health care delivery to these groups are explored. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved US Diversity course. (004448)
An exploration of traditional and contemporary American Indian thought regarding people in relationship to the human and nonhuman worlds, with focus on land ethic, animal ethics, sustainability. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (020644)
Prerequisite: 45 lower-division units.
This course introduces and analyzes the predominant philosophical, cultural, and scientific views on race and examines the issue of racism primarily in contemporary American culture. 3 hours lecture. This is an approved Writing Course. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved US Diversity course. (021267)
Catalog Cycle:21