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The Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

The Mechanical Engineering degree program includes the study of mechanical design, thermal-fluid systems, applied mechanics, and automation. The mechanical engineering student is prepared in all of these areas to analyze and design complex mechanical systems. Graduates can specialize in areas such as energy conversion systems, mechanisms and machines, manufacturing, materials, automation and applied robotics through elective courses.

The Mechanical Engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

Mechanical Engineering Program Mission

The Mechanical Engineering program has the primary mission of providing students a high-quality undergraduate engineering education with

  • A curriculum that is firmly grounded in engineering fundamentals.
  • A faculty that provides superior teaching and mentoring both in and out of the classroom.
  • A faculty whose focus is undergraduate education.
  • Class sizes that encourage student participation.
  • Project experiences that build on fundamentals and develop team skills.
  • Facilities and equipment that are readily accessible.
  • An environment that is conducive to learning and encourages students from different genders and backgrounds.

The faculty is committed to offering a broad undergraduate experience that will promote professional growth and prepare students for a variety of engineering careers, graduate studies, and continuing education.

Mechanical Engineering Program Educational Objectives

The Mechanical Engineering Program’s Educational Objectives are goals for its graduates to achieve a few years after graduation. Mechanical engineering graduates will be prepared to:

  • Practice in engineering-related fields chosen from a broad range of industries.
  • Recognize the need and have the ability to engage in continuing learning to adapt to evolving professions and to advance professionally.
  • Become contributing members of the society with an understanding of the inherent and unavoidable impact of practicing engineering.

Mechanical Engineering Student Outcomes

Student outcomes are narrower statements that describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation. Mechanical Engineering program graduates must demonstrate the following:

  1. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics.
  2. An ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors.
  3. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
  4. An ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts.
  5. An ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives.
  6. An ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions.
  7. An ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.

Mechanical Engineering Design Experience

The mechanical engineering program at CSU, Chico is a traditional balance of engineering science and design. The design sequence for mechanical engineers is a progressive one. The courses which are primarily devoted to design are:

MECH 140 - Introduction to Design and Automation

MECH 340 - Mechanical Engineering Design

MECH 440AW - Capstone Design Project I

MECH 440B- Capstone Design Project II

The freshman experience (MECH 140) gives students an introduction to the engineering design process and exposure to core automation concepts and components through semester-long projects. At the junior level (MECH 340), there is an opportunity to learn about safety, failure, reliability, codes and standards, and economic considerations, while carrying out detailed design of mechanical components. In the final senior project (MECH 440AW and MECH 440B), students are expected to exercise what they learned throughout the preceding design courses in a final project that includes manufacturing and testing, as well as the more global aspects of design including product realization, economic factors, environmental issues, and social impact. Together, these experiences prepare graduates to be successful practitioners with an awareness of the multitude of issues involved.

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree: 127 units

See Bachelor's Degree Requirements in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 39 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

A suggested Major Academic Plan (MAP) has been prepared to help students meet all graduation requirements within four years. You can view MAPs on the Major Academic Plans page or you can request a plan from your major advisor.

Courses in this program may complete more than one graduation requirement.

General Education Pathway Requirements: 48 units

See General Education in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education Pathway Requirements and course offerings.

This major has approved GE modification(s). See below for information on how to apply these modification(s).

  • Critical Thinking (Area A3) is waived.
  • Take only one course in either Arts (Area C1) or Humanities (Area C2).  The other is waived.
  • MECH 340 is an approved major course substitution for Social Sciences (Area D).
  • MECH 440B is an approved major course substitution for Lifelong Learning and Self-Development (Area E).
  • MECH 332 fulfills Upper-Division Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning (Area UD-B).

Diversity Course Requirements: 6 units

See Diversity Requirements in the University Catalog. Most courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also apply to General Education .

Both courses must also satisfy one of the General Education requirements in order for 127 units to fulfill all requirements for the Mechanical Engineering degree.

Upper-Division Writing Requirement:

Writing Across the Curriculum (Executive Memorandum 17-009) is a graduation requirement and may be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of four Writing (W) courses, two of which are designated by the major department. See Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning and Writing Requirements in the University Catalog for more details on the four courses.  The first of the major designated Writing (W) courses is listed below.

  • Any upper-division GE Writing Course (W).

The second major-designated Writing course is the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GW) (Executive Order 665). Students must earn a C- or higher to receive GW credit. The GE Written Communication (A2) requirement must be completed before a student is permitted to register for a GW course.

Grading Requirement:

All courses taken to fulfill major course requirements must be taken for a letter grade except those courses specified by the department as Credit/No Credit grading only.

Enrollment in any mathematics course requires a grade of C- or higher in all prerequisite courses or their transfer equivalents.

Course Requirements for the Major: 100 units

Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree.

Lower-Division Requirements: 50 units

17 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
A modern introduction to fundamental manufacturing practices as well as cutting-edge industrial manufacturing process advancements. Hands-on practice in traditional and advanced manufacturing methods. Integration of Life Cycle Assessment and Reduce, Reuse, Recycle principles. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. Formerly SMFG 160. (005149)
Prerequisites: GE Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning Ready; second-year high school algebra; one year high school chemistry. (One year of high school physics and one year of high school mathematics past Algebra II are recommended.)
Principles of chemistry for students in science and engineering programs. Topics include atoms, molecules and ions, reactions, stoichiometry, the periodic table, bonding, chemical energy, gases, and solution chemistry. The laboratory sequence supports the above topics including both qualitative and quantitative experiments, analysis of data, and error propagation. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (001816)
Prerequisites: MATH 121, PHYS 204A.
Force systems, moments, equilibrium, centroids, and moments of inertia. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (001489)
Prerequisites: MATH 109 and MATH 119 (or high school equivalent), or MATH 120, or passing score on the Math department administered calculus readiness exam.
Provides Mechanical Engineering students an applications-based introduction to electrical and electronic components. Course topics include circuit analysis; the selection and use of components; applications of transistors and diodes; logic gates and digital circuits; microcontroller applications and interfacing with sensors; three-phase circuits and ideal transformers. Instruments used in the study of basic electronics are discussed, demonstrated, and used. Mechanical Engineering majors may substitute EECE 211L for this course. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This course requires the use of a laptop computer and appropriate software. (022099)
Prerequisites: GE Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning Ready; both MATH 118 and MATH 119 (or college equivalent); first-year freshmen who successfully completed trigonometry and precalculus in high school can meet this prerequisite by achieving a score that meets department guidelines on a department administered calculus readiness exam.
Limits and continuity. The derivative and applications to related rates, maxma and minima, and curve sketching. Transcendental functions. An introduction to the definite integral and area. 4 hours discussion. This is an approved General Education course. (005506)
Prerequisite: MATH 120.
The definite integral and applications to area, volume, work, differential equations, etc. Sequences and series, vectors and analytic geometry in 2 and 3-space, polar coordinates, and parametric equations. 4 hours discussion. (005507)
Prerequisites: MATH 121.
Vector functions and space curves. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Vector calculus line integrals, surface integrals, divergence/curl, Green's Theorem, Divergence Theorem, and Stokes' Theorem. 4 hours discussion. (005508)
Prerequisites: MATH 121.
First order separable, linear, and exact equations; second order linear equations, Laplace transforms, series solutions at an ordinary point, systems of first order linear equations, and applications. 4 hours discussion. (005509)
Corequisites: MECH 100L.
Introduction to engineering graphics. Orthographic projection, auxiliary views, isometric views, dimensioning, tolerancing, drawing standards, working drawings, free-hand sketching, solid modeling. 1 hour discussion. (015811)
Corequisites: MECH 100.
Introduction to solid modeling using a parametric, feature-based application software, SolidWorks. Solid modeling of parts and assemblies, detail and assembly drawings. 3 hours laboratory. (020257)
Prerequisites: MATH 119 or GE Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning Ready, first-year freshmen who successfully completed trigonometry and precalculus in high school can meet this prerequisite by achieving a score that meets department guidelines on the calculus readiness exam.
This course is also offered as MECA 140.
Introduces the design process and fundamentals of automation. Hands-on use of sensors, pneumatics, stepper motors, bearings, couplings, gears, belts, pulleys, and framing materials. Topics include AC and DC motor control, simple electrical circuits, machine controllers, PLC programming, testing and analysis of results, budgeting, and bills of materials. Teams design and build a proof-of-concept system to verify their design. 1 hour discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (005401)
Prerequisites: MECH 100 and MECH 100L.
A study of advanced topics in Engineering Graphics. Concepts include drawing standards, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, working drawings, model based definition, intermediate to advanced solid modeling, advanced assemblies, renderings, animations, equations, and design considerations. Preparation for advanced certifications in Engineering Graphics. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (015854)
Prerequisite: MATH 121. Recommended: PHYS 204A.
A foundation course in technical computing for engineering. Introduces commercial software commonly used in the solution of engineering problems. Application areas include kinematics and kinetics, fluid flow, thermal systems, and machine design. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (021113)
Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or CHEM 111, PHYS 202A or PHYS 204A.
Corequisite: MECH 210L for MECA, MECH, and AMAR majors only.
Processing, structure, properties, and performance of engineering materials. Applied knowledge of material properties as engineering design parameters. Advanced manufacturing processes, including microfabrication are discussed. 3 hours discussion. (005402)
Corequisite: MECH 210 for AMAR, MECA, and MECH majors only.
Standards and procedures for materials testing. Hands-on experience with commonly used equipment for materials testing. Test data acquisition and integration for material properties. Presentation of test data and findings in technical reports. 3 hours laboratory. (021645)
Prerequisites: High school physics or faculty permission. Concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of MATH 121 (second semester of calculus) or equivalent.
Vectors, kinematics, particle dynamics, friction, work, energy, power, momentum, dynamics and statics of rigid bodies, oscillations, gravitation, fluids. Calculus used. A grade of C- or higher is required before progressing to either PHYS 204B or PHYS 204C. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. This is an approved General Education course. (007401)
Prerequisites: MATH 121, PHYS 204A with a grade of C- or higher.
Charge and matter, electric field, Gauss' law, electric potential, capacitors and dielectrics, current and resistance, magnetic field, Ampere's law, Faraday's law of induction, magnetic properties of matter, electromagnetic oscillations and waves. Calculus used. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (007402)

Upper-Division Requirements: 50 units

13 courses required:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisites: CIVL 211 with a grade of C- or higher; MATH 260 (may be taken concurrently); CIVL 212 or MECH 210 (may be taken concurrently).
Strength and elastic properties of materials of construction; tension, compression, shear, and torsion stresses; deflection and deformation; stress analysis of beams and columns. 4 hours discussion. (001491)
Prerequisites: CIVL 211 with a grade of C- or higher. Recommended: MATH 260, MECH 320 (may be taken concurrently).
Hydrostatics, principles of continuity, work-energy and momentum, viscous effects, dimensional analysis and similitude, flow in closed conduits, drag on objects. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (001496)
Prerequisites: EECE 211 and EECE 211L or EECE 215; and CSCI 111, MECH 208 or AMAR 300.
Measurement of steady-state and dynamic systems using standard laboratory instruments. Topics include calibration and dynamic response of instruments, statistical treatment of data, and applied feedback control systems. Concepts are reinforced with hands-on laboratory exercises. 2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (005420)
Prerequisites: EECE 211, MATH 260. Recommended: MECA 380, MECH 320; either CSCI 111 or MECH 208.
Modeling and simulation of dynamic system performance. Control system design for continuous systems using both analog and digital control techniques. 3 hours lecture. (005407)
Prerequisites: MATH 260, MECH 208. Recommended: PHYS 204A.
Numerical analysis, analytical methods, and equation solving techniques for mechanical engineering design. Structured problem formulation, parametric studies, introduction to programming concepts, and optimization for design. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (005413)
Prerequisites: CIVL 311 with a grade of C- or higher, MECH 306.
Development of finite element formulation from fundamental governing engineering equations. Coverage includes areas ranging from elasticity, vibration, and heat transfer to acoustics and composites. 3 hours lecture. (005439)
Prerequisites: CIVL 211 with a grade of C- or higher, MATH 260.
Kinematics and dynamics of mechanical systems composed of rigid bodies. Moments and products of inertia, forces of interaction, inertia forces and torques. Equations of motion of non-planar systems. 3 hours discussion. (005409)
Prerequisites: PHYS 204A.
Properties of substances, ideal gas equation of state, heat and work, first and second laws of thermodynamics, steady-state analysis of closed and open systems, entropy, gas and vapor power cycles, introduction to renewable energy sources. 3 hours discussion. (005414)
Prerequisites: CIVL 321, MATH 260, MECH 332. Recommended: MECH 306.
Conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfer; steady-state and transient analysis methods; numerical methods applied to conduction heat transfer; design of finned arrays, systems for electronics cooling, heat exchangers, and solar collectors. 3 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. (005448)
Prerequisites: CIVL 311 with a grade of C- or higher, MECH 100, MECH 100L, MECH 140, MECH 210, AMAR 160. Recommended: MECH 320.
Design and performance of machine components and systems subjected to both steady and variable loading conditions. Failure theories, reliability, use of codes and standards, and standard design practices are introduced. Also discussed are realistic constraints for design in economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability context. A grade of C- or higher is required to pass this course. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (005411)
Prerequisites: MECH 338.
Thermodynamics of power cycles, refrigeration, air-conditioning, and combustion processes; analysis, design, and testing of systems involving both conventional and renewable energy sources for power generation, heating, and cooling applications. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (005442)
Prerequisites: GE Oral Communication (A1) requirement; GE Written Communication (A2) requirement; MECH 200; MECH 340 with a grade of C- or higher. Recommended: MECA 380, MECH 308, MECH 338.
Design methods applied to mechanical system in group design projects. Project definition, planning, and management. Design for manufacture, cost considerations, budgets, and teamwork. Oral and written presentation of design results. Initial stage of the capstone design project to be continued in MECH 440B. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours supervision. This is an approved Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement course; a grade of C- or higher certifies writing proficiency for majors. This is an approved Writing Course. (005433)
Prerequisite: MECH 440AW. Recommended: MECA 380, MECH 308, MECH 338.
Continuation of the capstone design project from MECH 440AW including fabrication, testing, and evaluation of a working prototype. Impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal context. Ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering including continuing self-education and career development. Must be taken the semester immediately following MECH 440AW. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours supervision. (005434)

6 units selected from:

SUBJ NUM Title Sustainable Units Semester Offered Course Flags
Prerequisite: MECH 210.
This course provides students an introduction to composite materials and processing by investigating thermoplastic and thermoset composites, glass and carbon fiber reinforcements, biobased polymers and natural fibers, core materials, tooling, and thermoset processing equipment. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. Formerly SMFG 347. (021724)
Prerequisite: EECE 344 or MECA 380.
An overview of robotics and its application to advanced manufacturing. Topics include vision, motion planning, mobile mechanisms, kinematics, dynamics, and sensors. Course activities will utilize industrial scale robots and associated hardware as well as modern simulation tools. This course will also introduce contemporary topics in robotics research and its application. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (022128)
Prerequisites: OSCM 306 or faculty permission; MATH 105 or MATH 108 for Business majors only.
This course is also offered as OSCM 451.
The study and application of the quality management process in both the manufacturing and service sectors of the economy. Topics include process analysis and improvement, statistical process control, cost of quality, quality measurement, and quality in the global marketplace. 3 hours lecture. Formerly SMFG 451. (005784)
Prerequisites: Senior standing.
This course familiarizes students with techniques for managing technical projects while they design, plan, and implement a manufacturing project through the mock-up stage. Students work in groups on projects of mutual interest to gain experience in planning and updating schedules. Students learn to define requirements, estimate and manage resources, and structure decisions and trade-offs. Discussion includes global project management and supply chain responsibility. Emphasis is placed on group dynamics in communication and problem solving. 3 hours lecture. Formerly SMFG 458. (005291)
Prerequisite: AMAR 420.
A continuation of robotics and its application to advanced manufacturing. Implementation of smart manufacturing systems on the factory floor. Practical automation workflows based on parametric modeling, scripting, simulation, and optimization. Course activities will utilize industrial scale robots and associated hardware. This course will also introduce contemporary topics in robotics research applied to machine learning and artificial intelligence. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (022129)
Prerequisite: EECE 315 or MECH 210.
This course introduces the manufacturing processes for various classes of nanoscale devices from logic/memory semiconductors to nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS). Study of processes including photoresist lithography, ingot growth, ion implantation, chemical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition, and molecular beam epitaxy. Course covers the fundamental performance barriers for each material/device type and perform defect analyses to assess how defects either improve or degrade these materials. Also covered are financial aspects of nanoscale manufacturing including capital equipment costs, the financial history of these industries, return on investment, amortization, and case studies of both industry failures and successes. 3 hours lecture. Formerly SMFG 477. (021768)
Prerequisites: GE Written Communication (A2) requirement; MATH 105 and MATH 119, or MATH 121; junior standing.
This course provides a foundation for green engineering design through life cycle assessment and life cycle cost analysis considering economically viable, socially just, and environmentally sustainable solutions (triple bottom line). This course teaches quantitative environmental and economic assessment tools. decision-making strategies, risk, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty analysis. These skills are applied to real-world problems through group projects, emphasizing applied engineering, critical thinking, communication skills and teamwork. 3 hours discussion. This is an approved Writing Course. This course requires the use of a laptop computer and appropriate software. (001495)
Prerequisites: CIVL 311 with a grade of C- or higher; MECH 208 (may be taken concurrently).
Fundamentals of structural analysis for beams, trusses, and frames. Topics include loading (including seismic), influence lines, approximate analysis methods, deflection analysis, and statically indeterminate structures. Methods applicable to computer analysis are introduced. 3 hours discussion. This course requires the use of a laptop computer and appropriate software. (001499)
Prerequisites: GE Written Communication (A2) requirement; CIVL 321 (may be taken concurrently).
Soil properties, tests, and classification. Analysis of soil stresses, consolidation, shear strength, lateral pressures, and ground water movement. Related design consideration involving spread footings, piles, retaining walls, and slopes. Use of programmable scientific calculator required. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. (001511)
Prerequisites: CIVL 231 or faculty permission; junior standing.
Introduction to water quality, water supply, distribution, and drinking water treatment; wastewater collection, treatment, and disposal. Disease transmission; water quality parameters; physical, chemical, and biological processes in the treatment of water, wastewater, and biosolids. 3 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory. This course requires the use of a laptop computer and appropriate software. (001529)
Prerequisites: CIVL 205 or MECH 208; CIVL 321 with a grade of C- or higher.
Water resources engineering covers principles of hydraulics and hydrology relevant to civil engineering applications. Topics include open channel hydraulics, rainfall-runoff predictions, ground water hydraulics, water budget modeling, storm water routing, and urban storm water management. 2 hours discussion, 2 hours activity. This course requires the use of a laptop computer and appropriate software. (021142)
Prerequisites: EECE 211 with a grade C- or higher; MATH 260 (may be taken concurrently).
This course introduces students to advanced concepts related to analysis and applications of linear circuits. Topics include circuit analysis techniques for networks with both independent and dependent sources; Fourier Series and circuits response; transfer functions, poles and zeros; frequency response of passive and active circuits, Bode plots; frequency-selective circuits and applications; circuits analysis with Laplace Transforms; introduction to MATLAB. 4 hours discussion. (002527)
Prerequisites: EECE 211 and EECE 211L, or EECE 215, or PHYS 327; PHYS 204A.
An introduction to recording and analyzing electronic data collected from biological systems. Topics include measurement methods, design principles of biomedical instruments, bioelectronics, sensors, transducers, interface electronics, and embedded data acquisition systems. Explores sources of biomedical signals, bioelectrical signal monitoring, acquisition, processing, analysis, and interpretation of results. 3 hours discussion. This course requires the use of a laptop computer and appropriate software. (022130)
Prerequisite: EECE 211 (with a grade C- or higher).
Principles of electromechanical conversion, traditional and renewable energy sources, magnetic circuits and steady state performance of synchronous, dc and induction motors, state space models and dynamic performance of electric motors, linearized models and common control schemes for various motors. 4 hours lecture. This course requires the use of a laptop computer and appropriate software. (020256)
Prerequisites: PHYS 202A or PHYS 204A; EECE 314, and Senior Standing.
Fundamentals of bioimaging, signals and systems, tomography modalities, pattern recognition, and computer vision methods as applied to clinical diagnostics. Optics and photonics techniques, digital signal and imaging data processing, analysis, and characterization. Introduction to research methodologies and research on optical imaging systems and applications. Students presentations and written reports in cutting edge technologies. 4 hours lecture. This course requires the use of a laptop computer and appropriate software. (022132)
Prerequisites: MATH 120; PHYS 202B or PHYS 204B.
This course covers image processing principles, techniques, and algorithms. Topics in image acquisition, representation, analysis, filtering, segmentation, and feature extraction. use of image processing software tools for assignments and projects. 4 hours lecture. (022109)
Prerequisites: To be established when course is formulated.
Special topic generally offered one time only. Different sections may have different topics. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered. 3 hours lecture. (005653)
Prerequisites: Approval of supervising faculty member.
This course is an independent study of special problems offered for 1.0-3.0 units. See the department office for information on registering. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (005654)
Prerequisites: CSCI 111 or MECH 208; MECH 320 (may be taken concurrently).
This course introduces students to robotic manipulation design and control. Students apply the concepts in computer simulation and a physical system. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (021920)
Prerequisites: EECE 211L, MECH 340; EECE 482 or MECA 482 (may be taken concurrently).
Machine automation concepts in electrical circuits, precision mechanics, control systems, and programming. Motor sizing, gearing, couplings, ground loops, effective use of step motors, servo control loops, regeneration, networking, I/O, power supplies, vibration and resonance, mechanical tolerancing, linear bearings and drive mechanisms, and troubleshooting. Labs simulate application concepts such as point-to-point coordinated moves, registration, following, camming, and CAD-to-Motion by combining various motor technologies with various mechanical drive types. 2 hours lecture, 4 hours activity. (005655)
Prerequisites: To be established when course is formulated.
Special topic generally offered one time only. Different sections may have different topics. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered. 3 hours lecture. (005660)
Prerequisites: Approval of supervising faculty member.
Independent study of a special problem. See the department office for registration procedure. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (015851)
Prerequisites: Approval of faculty internship coordinator prior to off-campus assignment.
Engineering experience in an industrial setting. Minimum duration of 400 hours of work under the direct supervision of an on-site engineering supervisor. On completion of the internship, a written report prepared under the direction of a faculty member is required. This course is an elective for the BS in Mechanical Engineering, a total of 3 units must be completed to receive elective credit. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 3.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (005454)
Prerequisites: To be established when course is formulated.
Special topic generally offered one time only. Different sections may have different topics. See the Class Schedule for specific topic being offered. 3 hours lecture. (005424)
Prerequisites: Approval of supervising faculty member.
This course is an independent study of special problems offered for 1.0-3.0 units. See the department office for information on registering. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (005426)
Prerequisites: MECH 200, MECH 308, MECH 338, MECH 340.
Computer modeling, simulation, and solution of engineering problems. Applications in mechanical, thermal, and fluid flow analysis. Emphasis on proper use of current commercial software and solution verification through traditional engineering analysis. 3 hours lecture. (021223)
Prerequisites: MATH 260, MECH 210. Recommended: CIVL 311.
Design, manufacture, and practical applications of advanced engineering materials. Failure analysis and prevention of material failure in mechanical design. Microfabrication of micromechanical devices. 3 hours discussion. (005428)
Prerequisites: MECH 320.
Free and forced vibrations of lumped parameter systems, transient vibrations, systems with several degrees-of-freedom. 3 hours discussion. (005437)
Prerequisites: CHEM 111, MECH 210, and PHYS 204B, or consent of the instructor.
This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of nanoscale science and engineering including the areas of engineering, materials science, chemistry, and physics. The topics covered include advanced materials, synthesis and modification of nanomaterials, properties of nanomaterials, materials characterization, nanofabrication methods, and applications. It has three modules which are formal lectures, guest speakers, and projects. For the projects student learn to conduct a literature search on a given topic and are asked to present their project. They further have a chance to propose their own ideas for potential applications and are asked to give detailed methodology to execute the project. 3 hours discussion. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 9.0 units. (021952)
Prerequisites: CIVL 321; EECE 211; MECH 338 (may be taken concurrently).
This introductory course covers the design and operation of solar photovoltaic (PV) and solar thermal systems. Foundational topics include solar radiation characteristics, solar materials, and heat transfer. Solar PV systems include cell operations, I-V characteristics, module design, maximum power-point tracking, charge controllers, batteries, inverters, design of grid-tied and off-grid systems, and system performance evaluation. Solar thermal systems include flat-plate collectors, concentrating collectors, passive and active solar water heating, solar space heating and cooling, and solar thermal power systems. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity. (021438)
Prerequisites: CIVL 321, MATH 260.
Recommended: MECH 306. Flow around elementary shapes, concepts of flow circulation, lift and drag. Incompressible inviscid flows around thin airfoils and wings of finite span. 3 hours discussion. (005444)
Prerequisites: To be established when course is formulated.
Special topic generally offered one time only. Different sections may have different topics. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered. 3 hours lecture. (005456)
Prerequisites: Approval of supervising faculty member.
This course is an independent study of special problems offered for 1.0-3.0 units. See the department office for information on registering. 3 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading. (005457)
Prerequisites: Completion of 12 units of upper-division MECH courses, faculty permission.
Open by invitation to MECH majors who have a GPA among the top 5% of MECH students based upon courses taken at CSU, Chico. This is an "Honors in the Major" course; a grade of B or better in 6 units of MECH 499H certifies the designation of "Honors in the Major" to be printed on the transcript and the diploma. If taken twice, prerequisite to the second semester is a grade of B or better in the first semester. Each 3-unit course will require both formal written and oral presentations. 9 hours supervision. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. (005458)

Fundamentals of Engineering Examination

The Fundamentals of Engineering Exam is the first of two exams that the California State Board of Registration requires to be passed to be a licensed professional engineer. Prior to graduation, those majoring in Mechanical Engineering are encouraged to apply to the California State Board of Registration and take the exam. Passing the exam is not required for graduation.

Advising Requirement:

Advising is mandatory for all majors in this degree program. Consult your undergraduate advisor for specific information.

Honors in the Major:

Honors in the Major is a program of independent work in your major. It requires 6 units of honors course work completed over two semesters.

The Honors in the Major program allows you to work closely with a faculty mentor in your area of interest on an original performance or research project. This year-long collaboration allows you to work in your field at a professional level and culminates in a public presentation of your work. Students sometimes take their projects beyond the University for submission in professional journals, presentation at conferences, or academic competition. Such experience is valuable for graduate school and professional life. Your honors work will be recognized at your graduation, on your permanent transcripts, and on your diploma. It is often accompanied by letters of commendation from your mentor in the department or the department chair.

Some common features of Honors in the Major program are:

  • You must take 6 units of Honors in the Major course work. All 6 units are honors classes (marked by a suffix of H), and at least 3 of these units are independent study (399H, 499H, 599H) as specified by your department. You must complete each class with a minimum grade of B.
  • You must have completed 9 units of upper-division course work or 21 overall units in your major before you can be admitted to Honors in the Major. Check the requirements for your major carefully, as there may be specific courses that must be included in these units.
  • Your cumulative GPA should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  • Your GPA in your major should be at least 3.5 or within the top 5% of majors in your department.
  • Most students apply for or are invited to participate in Honors in the Major during the second semester of their junior year. Then they complete the 6 units of course work over the two semesters of their senior year.
  • Your honors work culminates with a public presentation of your honors project.

While Honors in the Major is part of the Honors Program, each department administers its own program. Please contact your major department or major advisor to apply.

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